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83 records – page 1 of 9.

Accounting for variation in hospital outcomes: a cross-national study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201687
Source
Health Aff (Millwood). 1999 May-Jun;18(3):256-9
Publication Type
Article

Acute otitis media in children younger than 2 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107561
Source
JAMA Pediatr. 2013 Dec;167(12):1171-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Alejandro Hoberman
Aino Ruohola
Nader Shaikh
Paula A Tähtinen
Jack L Paradise
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
Source
JAMA Pediatr. 2013 Dec;167(12):1171-2
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Amoxicillin-Potassium Clavulanate Combination - therapeutic use
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Finland
Humans
Infant
Otitis Media - drug therapy
Pennsylvania
Treatment Failure
Treatment Outcome
PubMed ID
23999574 View in PubMed
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An analysis of the variation of incidence of congenital dysgenetic hypothyroidism in various countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60348
Source
Endocrinol Jpn. 1984 Feb;31(1):77-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1984
Author
K. Miyai
J F Connelly
T P Foley
M. Irie
R. Illig
S O Lie
J. Morissette
H. Nakajima
P. Rochiccioli
P G Walfish
Source
Endocrinol Jpn. 1984 Feb;31(1):77-81
Date
Feb-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Australia
Canada
Comparative Study
Congenital Hypothyroidism
France
Humans
Hypothyroidism - epidemiology
Infant, Newborn
Japan
Mass Screening
Norway
Pennsylvania
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Seasons
Switzerland
Thyroid Gland - abnormalities
Abstract
The seasonal and chronological distributions of birth dates of 820 patients with congenital hypothyroidism due to thyroid dysgenesis were analysed in eight areas in the world. The incidence had some seasonal variations in certain areas. These observations suggest that some environmental factors cause this disease.
PubMed ID
6734525 View in PubMed
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An international study of the relationship between alcohol consumption and postmenopausal estradiol levels.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12094
Source
Alcohol Alcohol Suppl. 1991;1:327-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
J S Gavaler
K. Love
D. Van Thiel
S. Farholt
C. Gluud
E. Monteiro
A. Galvao-Teles
T C Ortega
V. Cuervas-Mons
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA 15261.
Source
Alcohol Alcohol Suppl. 1991;1:327-30
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - blood
Body mass index
Comparative Study
Denmark
Estradiol - blood
Female
Humans
Menopause - blood
Middle Aged
Pennsylvania
Portugal
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Spain
Temperance
Abstract
Because of the beneficial effect of estrogens on the risk of cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis in postmenopausal women, the factors which influence endogenous postmenopausal estrogen levels are of substantial importance. The major source of postmenopausal estrogen is the aromatization of androgens to estrogens. Because alcohol is reported to increase aromatization rates, the relationship between serum estradiol and moderate alcohol consumption was examined in a group of 128 healthy Pittsburgh postmenopausal women, and a significant direct association was found. In order to address the generalizability of this finding, 3 comparable study populations of healthy postmenopausal women were recruited: 62 in Copenhagen, 34 in Lisbon and 20 in Madrid. Although no association was detected in the Madrid study sample, in both the Copenhagen and Lisbon study populations, not only were estradiol levels significantly increased in alcohol users as compared to abstainers, but also estradiol levels were significantly correlated with total weekly drinks consumed. Based on these findings in study samples of healthy postmenopausal women from Pittsburgh, Copenhagen and Lisbon, we conclude that the increase in estradiol levels seen with moderate alcoholic beverage consumption is not an isolated finding and speculate that moderate alcohol consumption by healthy postmenopausal women may have beneficial effects.
PubMed ID
1845556 View in PubMed
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Attitude instrument analysis: an examination of factor consistency across two samples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248973
Source
Int J Aging Hum Dev. 1978-1979;9(4):359-75
Publication Type
Article
Author
T. Hickey
S M Bragg
W. Rakowski
D F Hultsch
Source
Int J Aging Hum Dev. 1978-1979;9(4):359-75
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aging
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Geriatrics
Humans
Pennsylvania
Psychological Tests
Abstract
The factor analytic model of the practitioner-oriented opinions about people (OAP) was tested with a population of gerontological practitioners (N =558). A confirmatory factor analysis was performed to ascertain the degree-of-fit between these data and the published OAP factor model. After results supported the hypothesis that the two samples differed, a second factor analysis was designed to yield estimates of communalities by a least squares multiple regression technique. This analysis eliminated nine items not warranting inclusion in the instrument, redistributed the factors, and brought out a completely new factor. Finally, to test the hypothesis that attitudes toward aging and the aged are uncorrelated, a third analysis was performed in which the six scales of the oblique solution were refactored. The resulting higher order dimensions tended to support this hypothesis.
PubMed ID
753782 View in PubMed
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Barriers to measles and pertussis immunization: the knowledge and attitudes of Pennsylvania primary care physicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209192
Source
Am J Prev Med. 1997 Mar-Apr;13(2):89-97
Publication Type
Article
Author
R K Zimmerman
B J Bradford
J E Janosky
T A Mieczkowski
E. DeSensi
S. Grufferman
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, PA 15261, USA.
Source
Am J Prev Med. 1997 Mar-Apr;13(2):89-97
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Chi-Square Distribution
Child, Preschool
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Immunization - economics - psychology
Immunization Schedule
Infant
Insurance, Health - statistics & numerical data
Linear Models
Male
Measles - prevention & control - transmission
Multivariate Analysis
Pennsylvania
Physicians, Family - education - psychology
Pregnancy
Referral and Consultation - economics
Sampling Studies
Vaccines - administration & dosage - contraindications - economics
Whooping Cough - prevention & control - therapy
Abstract
To understand the causes of low childhood immunization rates, physicians were interviewed about their knowledge, attitudes, and self-reported immunization practices.
Trained interviewers conducted a standardized telephone survey of physicians. A random sample of Pennsylvania family physicians, pediatricians, and general practitioners younger than 65 years of age who were in office-based practices was selected from the combined listings of the American Medical Association and American Osteopathic Association. Physicians seeing > or = 5 patients per week under age 6 years, seeing a total of > or = 15 patients per week, and having > or = 50% primary care patients were eligible. Of 383 eligible physicians, 70% (268) responded. The questionnaire was designed using the Health Belief Model, immunization barriers, and input from practitioners in primary care, pediatric infectious disease, maternal/ child health, and preventive medicine.
Respondents were more likely to refer to public vaccine clinics those children without insurance (P 90%) respondents thought that vaccine efficacy was high and that the likelihood of serious side effects was low. However, only 37% gave estimates that corresponded with the literature regarding the likelihood of an infant with pertussis to need hospitalization. Many respondents used invalid vaccine contraindications; for instance, 37% would not administer MMR to a boy whose mother was pregnant. Many respondents (21%) would not administer four vaccines simultaneously.
If the Healthy People 2000 goal to eliminate indigenous cases of measles is to be achieved, free vaccine supplies and increased provider education are needed.
PubMed ID
9088444 View in PubMed
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[Bone marrow transplantation as a treatment of accidental total-body irradiation; a review of past experiences]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37671
Source
Rinsho Ketsueki. 1990 Jun;31(6):693-701
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1990

Brachymesophalangia-V in five samples of children: a descriptive and methodological study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245554
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 1980 Aug;53(2):189-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1980
Author
P H Buschang
R M Malina
Source
Am J Phys Anthropol. 1980 Aug;53(2):189-95
Date
Aug-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
African Continental Ancestry Group
Anthropometry
Canada
Child
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Fingers - abnormalities
Germany, West
Humans
Male
Mexico
Pennsylvania
Abstract
The occurrence of brachmesophalangia-V (BMP-V) in 2,012 individuals from five samples of children of different ethnic backgrounds was determined using two indices. Frequencies of BMP-V were analyzed for three variants: BMP-V alone, BMP-V with clinodactyly, and BMP-V with a cone-shaped epiphysis. The two indices used to identify BMP-V indicated highest relative frequencies among Mexican children, moderate frequencies among children of European ancestry (Pennsylvania White, Canadian, West German), and lower frequencies in Pennsylvania Black children. Index 1, based on the ratio of the width to the length of the fifth mid-phalanx, consistently produced higher frequencies than Index 2, based on the ratio of the length of the fifth to the length of the fourth mid-phalanges. Index 1 was also more selective of BMP-alone, while Index 2 selected primarily BMP-V with clinodactyly and/or cone-shaped epiphyses. The differences between indices were largely due to the fact that Index 1, which basically defines shape, selected both the shortest and/or widest mid-phalanges, while Index 2 related actual length differences. It is suggested that Index 2 provided a more suitable criterion of BMP-V in comparative studies, due to possible population differences in phalangeal shape.
PubMed ID
7416253 View in PubMed
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83 records – page 1 of 9.