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A 10-year follow-up study of penicillin-non-susceptible S. pneumoniae during an intervention programme in Malmö, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80473
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2006;38(10):838-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Nilsson Percy
Laurell Martin H
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. percy.nilsson@pediatrik.mas.lu.se
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2006;38(10):838-44
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Drug Utilization
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Penicillin resistance
Physician's Practice Patterns
Pneumococcal Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Practice Guidelines
Streptococcus pneumoniae - drug effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Changes in the proportion of penicillin-non-susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae (PNSP) isolates during an intervention programme were evaluated by phenotypic analysis of all initial isolates with penicillin MIC > or =0.5 microg/ml (n=1248) collected 1995-2004. During the study period, the proportion of such isolates was fairly constant (12-19%), and there was no statistically significant variation in the proportion of total PNSP cases (MIC > or =0.12 microg/ml) or PNSP with MIC > or =0.5 microg/ml, with the exception of an increase in 2004. Analysis restricted to clinical cases revealed no statistically significant changes. 23 different serogroups were found, and serogroup 9 isolates accounted for almost half of the PNSP cases. Only minor changes in phenotypic characteristics occurred in the other serogroups, which indicates that the increase in PNSP in 2004 was not due to import of a new resistant clone. Antibiotic consumption is considered to be an important risk factor for penicillin resistance in S. pneumoniae. After initiation of the intervention programme in Malmö, overall prescribing of antibiotics decreased 28%, and the reduction was even greater among children (52%). In conclusion, the proportion of PNSP isolates in Malmö has remained stable, despite the intervention programme and decreased consumption of antibiotics.
PubMed ID
17008226 View in PubMed
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Age-related frequency of penicillin resistance of oral Veillonella.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183863
Source
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 2003 Aug;46(4):279-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
S. Nyfors
E. Könönen
A. Bryk
R. Syrjänen
H. Jousimies-Somer
Author Affiliation
Department of Microbiology, National Public Health Institute (KTL), Helsinki, Finland. SusanNyforsUK@aol.com
Source
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 2003 Aug;46(4):279-83
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Lactams - pharmacology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Mouth - microbiology
Penicillin resistance
Reference Values
Sampling Studies
Sensitivity and specificity
Veillonella - drug effects - isolation & purification
Abstract
Veillonella spp. are early colonizing inhabitants in the mouth. As part of studies on penicillin resistance among oral indigenous anaerobic microbiota in childhood, the aim of the present longitudinal study was to examine the emergence of resistant strains in Veillonella populations. Altogether 305 Veillonella isolates from saliva of 49 healthy infants followed from 2 to 24 months of age were examined for their in vitro susceptibility to penicillin G and, further, 20 penicillin-resistant isolates representing 5 MIC categories to ampicillin, amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, cefoxitin, and beta-lactamase production. In infants positive for oral Veillonella, the recovery rate of penicillin-resistant (MIC >/=2 microg/ml) strains increased with age up to 68%, however, most infants simultaneously harbored penicillin-susceptible strains. During the follow-up, the MIC(50) increased from 0.5 microg/ml to 2 microg/ml. In addition to penicillin G, 8/20 strains also showed reduced susceptibility to ampicillin and/or amoxicillin but none produced beta-lactamase. Our study suggests other mechanisms than enzymatic degradation of beta-lactam ring for resistance of oral Veillonella to penicillin.
PubMed ID
12944020 View in PubMed
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[A handling program for resistant pneumococci. Physicians sometimes neglect mandatory notification]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34059
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Dec 17;94(51-52):4914-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-17-1997
Author
J. Hedlund
B. Olsson-Liljequist
Author Affiliation
Infektionskliniken, Danderyds sjukhus.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Dec 17;94(51-52):4914-8
Date
Dec-17-1997
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Disease Notification
English Abstract
Humans
Penicillin resistance
Pneumococcal Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Questionnaires
Streptococcus pneumoniae - drug effects - immunology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Streptococcus pneumoniae infections belong to the leading worldwide causes of illness and death among young children, people with underlying debilitating medical conditions, and the elderly. Following early documentation of infections due to pneumococcal strains with reduced penicillin susceptibility in Australia in 1967, and of infections due to penicillin-resistant strains in South Africa in 1978, pneumococcal resistance to penicillin and other antibiotics has progressed rapidly and is now a global problem. In Sweden, notification of the occurrence of pneumococci with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) > or = 0.5 mg/L for penicillin G (PcG) has been mandatory for general practitioners (GPs) and clinical microbiological laboratories since 1 January 1996. In 1996, 1,057 cases of infection by such pneumococci were reported by microbiological laboratories, but only 262 cases by GPs. With a view to minimising the impact of pneumococci with reduced penicillin susceptibility in Sweden, the National Board of Health and Welfare set up a working group of experts in November 1994. To reduce the transmission of such bacteria in the community, the working group introduced a control programme which includes the isolation of day-care children under six years of age carrying pneumococci with PcG-MICs > or = 0.5 mg/L. An enquiry among the 25 regional centres for infectious disease control in the country to ascertain compliance in the different counties of Sweden showed the programme to have been adhered to in a majority of counties, although many had chosen alternative measures to deal with the problem.
PubMed ID
9454013 View in PubMed
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[Ampicillin resistant Haemophilus influenzae. 3 documented cases in Denmark]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41990
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1977 Apr 11;139(15):887-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-11-1977

Ampicillin-resistant Hemophilus influenzae in Canada: nationwide survey of hospital laboratories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247006
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1979 Jul 21;121(2):198-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-21-1979
Author
D W Scheifele
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1979 Jul 21;121(2):198-202
Date
Jul-21-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ampicillin - therapeutic use
Canada
Chloramphenicol - therapeutic use
Haemophilus influenzae
Humans
Meningitis, Haemophilus - drug therapy
Penicillin resistance
Retrospective Studies
Notes
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1974 Nov;6(5):620-415825316
Cites: JAMA. 1978 Jan 23;239(4):320-322767
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1978 Jun;7(6):519-23307559
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1978 Sep;138(3):421-4308974
Cites: J Pediatr. 1978 Jun;92(6):889-92307055
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1978 Jul;14(1):154-6308347
Cites: J Pediatr. 1977 Feb;90(2):320-1299774
Cites: J Pediatr. 1977 Feb;90(2):319-20299773
Cites: JAMA. 1978 Jan 23;239(4):324-7244331
Cites: Pediatrics. 1976 Sep;58(3):382-71085435
Cites: Lancet. 1974 Feb 23;1(7852):3134130492
Cites: Am J Dis Child. 1976 Sep;130(9):965-708980
Cites: J Pediatr. 1972 Aug;81(2):370-75042500
Cites: Pediatrics. 1976 Sep;58(3):388-911085436
Cites: Pediatrics. 1976 Mar;57(3):4171083008
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1975 AUG 9;113(3):222, 2271079748
PubMed ID
316354 View in PubMed
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An epidemic due to sulphonamide-resistant group A meningococci in the Helsinki area (Finland). Epidemiological and clinical observations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251584
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1976;8(4):249-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976
Author
I. Salmi
O. Pettay
I. Simula
A K Kallio
O. Waltimo
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1976;8(4):249-54
Date
1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Arthritis - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland
Humans
Infant
Male
Meningococcal Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology - genetics
Middle Aged
Neisseria meningitidis
Penicillin G - therapeutic use
Penicillin resistance
Prognosis
Seasons
Sex Factors
Sulfonamides
Abstract
An epidemic due to sulphonamide-resistant group A meningococci started in Finland in January 1973. By the end of 1974 the number of cases exceeded 1300. This report describes epidemiological and clinical observations in 370 patients treated in Helsinki 1973-1974. The incidence was about 65 per 100 000 per year in children under 7 years of age and about 10 per 100 000 in adults. More than one case occurred in 3.8% of the families and in 36% of the lodging-houses of the lowest social group. The fatality rate of patients treated in hospital was 4.1%. Persistent neurological damage was noticed in 4.6%.
PubMed ID
827013 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic abuse: the testimony of medical students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252153
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1975 Jun 21;112(12):1428-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-21-1975
Author
T L Perry
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1975 Jun 21;112(12):1428-9
Date
Jun-21-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ampicillin - therapeutic use
Anti-Infective Agents - therapeutic use
Bacterial Infections - diagnosis - drug therapy
British Columbia
Clindamycin - therapeutic use
Cloxacillin - therapeutic use
Education, Medical, Undergraduate
Erythromycin - therapeutic use
Humans
Neomycin - therapeutic use
Penicillin G - therapeutic use
Penicillin resistance
Penicillin V - therapeutic use
Student Health Services - standards
Students, Medical
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Sulfonamides - therapeutic use
Tetracycline - therapeutic use
Abstract
Surveys of the use of antimicrobial drugs on students during antimicrobial drugs on students during their first 15 months in medical or dental school indicate that they have been treated with these agents at least three times as frequently as seems reasonable, and that the tetracyclines, ampicillin, penicillin G and erythromycin are the chief drugs overused. Antimicrobiol therapy is frequently instituted for probable viral respiratory tract infections and without any attempt to establish a bacteriologic diagnosis. It is likely that anitmicrobiol agents are used more widely in treating the general public in Canada than in treating medical students. Improvements in the rational use of this important group of drugs could increase the quality and probably reduced the cost of medical care.
Notes
Cites: Can Med Assoc J. 1967 Dec 9;97(24):1445-506061608
Cites: JAMA. 1974 Mar 4;227(9):1023-84405926
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1971 Jun 17;284(24):1361-84930604
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1973 Oct;79(4):555-604795880
Cites: Lancet. 1974 Feb 23;1(7852):3134130492
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1974 Aug;130(2):165-84842338
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1974 Oct 3;291(14):733-44851512
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1972 Aug 10;287(6):261-75038951
Cites: J Infect Dis. 1969 Jun;119(6):662-55795107
PubMed ID
806341 View in PubMed
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Antibiotic management of pneumococcal infections in an era of increased resistance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207780
Source
J Paediatr Child Health. 1997 Aug;33(4):287-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997
Author
K. Grimwood
P J Collignon
B J Currie
M J Ferson
G L Gilbert
G G Hogg
D. Isaacs
P B McIntyre
Author Affiliation
Australasian Society for Infectious Diseases, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
Source
J Paediatr Child Health. 1997 Aug;33(4):287-95
Date
Aug-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Drug Resistance, Multiple
Humans
Infant
Lactams
Meningitis - drug therapy
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Otitis Media - drug therapy
Penicillin resistance
Penicillins - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Pneumococcal Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology
Pneumonia - drug therapy
Prevalence
Prognosis
Species Specificity
Streptococcus pneumoniae - drug effects
Abstract
Pneumococci are a leading cause of bacterial meningitis and bacteraemia, as well as pneumonia, otitis media and sinusitis in childhood. These organisms recently have shown a dramatic increase in antibiotic resistance. Penicillin-resistant pneumococci are of special concern as they are often resistant to other unrelated antibiotics. This is of particular significance to Aboriginal children who have among the highest rates of pneumococcal infection in the world. Laboratories should now test all invasive pneumococcal isolates for penicillin and third generation cephalosporin resistance. Local treatment guidelines are required for pneumococcal infections, especially for meningitis, taking into account the prevalence of resistant strains within the community. At present, penicillin and amoxycillin remain the drugs of choice for pneumococcal infections, with the exception of meningitis where initial empirical therapy must be with a third generation cephalosporin. Judicious antibiotic use, which avoids over-prescribing and unnecessary use of broad-spectrum agents, improved living standards in underprivileged communities and introduction of an effective conjugate vaccine, able to reduce the rates of pneumococcal infection and hopefully colonization, may limit the spread of resistant strains.
PubMed ID
9323614 View in PubMed
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192 records – page 1 of 20.