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610 records – page 1 of 61.

A 3-year follow-up of participation in peer support groups after a cardiac event.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53243
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2004 Dec;3(4):315-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Cathrine Hildingh
Bengt Fridlund
Author Affiliation
School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Otto Torells Gata 16, Varberg 432 44, Sweden. Catherine.Hildingh@hos.hh.se
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2004 Dec;3(4):315-20
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary - rehabilitation
Case-Control Studies
Coronary Artery Bypass - rehabilitation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - rehabilitation
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Peer Group
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self-Help Groups
Sweden
Abstract
Secondary prevention is an important component of a structured rehabilitation programme following a cardiac event. Comprehensive programmes have been developed in many European countries, the vast majority of which are hospital based. In Sweden, all patients with cardiac disease are also given the opportunity to participate in secondary prevention activities arranged by the National Association for Heart and Lung Patients [The Heart & Lung School (HL)]. The aim of this 3-year longitudinal study was to compare persons who attended the HL after a cardiac event and those who declined participation, with regard to health aspects, life situation, social network and support, clinical data, rehospitalisation and mortality. Totally 220 patients were included in the study. The patients were asked to fill in a questionnaire on four occasions, in addition to visiting a health care center for physical examination. After 3 years, 160 persons were still participating, 35 of whom attended the HL. The results show that persons who participated in the HL exercised more regularly, smoked less and had a denser network as well as more social support from nonfamily members than the comparison groups. This study contributes to increased knowledge among healthcare professionals, politicians and decision makers about peer support groups as a support strategy after a cardiac event.
PubMed ID
15572020 View in PubMed
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Ability OnLine: children in hospital now in touch with the world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214112
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1995 Nov-Dec;4(6):26-9, 43
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Lefebvre
M. McClure
Author Affiliation
Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1995 Nov-Dec;4(6):26-9, 43
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child, Hospitalized - psychology
Chronic Disease - psychology
Communication Aids for Disabled
Computer Communication Networks - utilization
Disabled Persons - psychology
Humans
Organizational Innovation
Peer Group
Self Concept
Social Facilitation
Social Support
Abstract
Health prevention seeks to avoid the onset of disease or symptoms by eliminating or at least minimizing environmental factors that increase the risk of illness. This article describes Ability OnLine, an innovative program designed to reduce the isolation young people can experience in a healthcare facility or when confined to their home. The electronic bulletin board is a friendly platform for disabled and chronically ill children to easily communicate with their peers and adult and teen mentors.
PubMed ID
10172531 View in PubMed
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Abstinence in late adolescence--antecedents to and covariates of a sober lifestyle and its consequences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11379
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1995 Jul;41(1):113-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1995
Author
H. Leifman
E. Kühlhorn
P. Allebeck
S. Andréasson
A. Romelsjö
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, University of Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 1995 Jul;41(1):113-21
Date
Jul-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - psychology
Case-Control Studies
Fathers
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Mental health
Peer Group
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Behavior
Sweden
Temperance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The purpose of this study was first to compare 18-19-year-old male abstainers with alcohol consumers, and especially light consumers, regarding degree of sociability as indicated by their (in)security in the company of others, their number of close friends, intimate conversations with friends and their popularity in school. Secondly, we analysed the importance of antecedents to and covariates of abstinence. In addition, the significant antecedents and covariates gave us information as to abstinence patterns. The study was based on a survey of all Swedish males, 18-19 years old, conscripted for military service in 1969-70. Data had been collected by means of questionnaires and psychological interviews, giving measures of each respondent's social background, psychiatric/psychological and psychosomatic health status, substance use, deviant behaviour and degree of sociability. Poor sociability was more common among the abstainers than among all the other categories of drinkers, including the light consumers. The conscripts' social background, and especially their fathers' drinking habits, had the strongest effects in explaining abstinence. Sixty-two per cent of all abstainers had non-drinking fathers, compared to 28% of the light consumers. As to the majority of abstainers, this indicates a link between the social background of temperance and their own reported abstinence. Their poor sociability could be a consequence of abstaining at a young age when abstinence is uncommon. Those who abstained despite a drinking father showed a worsening psychological status, suggesting a link between psychologically impaired health, poor sociability and abstinence. Though the abstainers were the least sociable, the difference between the abstainers, the light consumers and the moderate consumers in other categories were generally small.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
7667664 View in PubMed
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Academic careers in medical education: perceptions of the effects of a faculty development program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200453
Source
Acad Med. 1999 Oct;74(10 Suppl):S72-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999

Adherence to self-care and social support.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47594
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2001 Sep;10(5):618-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
M. Toljamo
M. Hentinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing and Health Administration, Oulu University Hospital, University of Oulu, Finland. maisa.toljamo@oulu.fi
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2001 Sep;10(5):618-27
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - metabolism - prevention & control - psychology
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Family - psychology
Female
Finland
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Logistic Models
Male
Nursing Methodology Research
Patient Compliance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Patient Education - standards
Peer Group
Predictive value of tests
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Self Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Smoking - adverse effects
Social Support
Abstract
The purpose of the study reported in this paper was to describe adherence to self-care, perceived difficulties and social support in a group of adult patients (n = 213) with insulin-treated diabetes from two outpatient clinics in Northern Finland. Data were collected by questionnaire. The instruments were developed to measure adherence to self-care, difficulties in self-care and social support. The response rate was 76%. One-way ANOVA, logistic regression analysis, contingency and Pearson's correlation coefficients were used in the statistical analysis. A fifth of the respondents were neglecting their self-care. The others undertook flexible, regimen-adherent or self-planned self-care. The subjects had no difficulties with insulin treatment, but had more problems with other aspects of self-care. Poor metabolic control, smoking and living alone predicted neglect of self-care, but if patients had support from family and friends, living alone was not a predictor of neglect of self-care. Those with poor metabolic control perceived themselves as getting peer support from other persons with diabetes.
PubMed ID
11822512 View in PubMed
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Adolescence. Vancouver Conference Review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7752
Source
AIDS Care. 1997 Feb;9(1):62-6
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Feb-1997

Adolescent constructions of nicotine addiction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180194
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2004 Mar;36(1):22-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Joan L Bottorff
Joy L Johnson
Barbara Moffat
Jeevan Grewal
Pamela A Ratner
Cecilia Kalaw
Author Affiliation
Nursing and Health Behaviour Research Unit, School of Nursing, T201-2211 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2B5, Canada. bottorff@nursing.ubc.ca
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2004 Mar;36(1):22-39
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Attitude to Health
Behavior, Addictive - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Canada
Causality
Cognitive Dissonance
Concept Formation
Family - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Motivation
Nursing Methodology Research
Peer Group
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Social Environment
Social Perception
Tobacco Use Disorder - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
The purpose of this qualitative study was to extend our understanding of how adolescents view nicotine addiction. This secondary analysis included 80 open-ended interviews with adolescents with a variety of smoking histories. The transcribed interviews were systematically analyzed to identify salient explanations of nicotine addiction. These explanations presuppose causal pathways of nicotine exposure leading to addiction and include repeated use, the brain and body "getting used to" nicotine, personal weakness, and family influences. A further explanation is that some youths pretend to be addicted to project a "cool" image. These explanations illustrate that some youths see themselves as passive players in the formation of nicotine addiction. The findings can be used in the development of programs to raise youth awareness about nicotine addiction.
PubMed ID
15133917 View in PubMed
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Adolescent disclosure and concealment: longitudinal and concurrent associations with aggression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113486
Source
Aggress Behav. 2013 Sep-Oct;39(5):335-45
Publication Type
Article
Author
Chelom E Leavitt
David A Nelson
Sarah M Coyne
Craig H Hart
Author Affiliation
School of Family Life, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah, USA.
Source
Aggress Behav. 2013 Sep-Oct;39(5):335-45
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Aggression - psychology
Child
Child, Preschool
Crime Victims - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Peer Group
Russia
Self Report
Sex Factors
Truth Disclosure
Abstract
This longitudinal study assessed the association between prior (preschool) and concurrent physical and relational aggression as they relate to Russian adolescents' disclosure and concealment patterns with their parents. In the initial preschool study, there were 106 boys and 106 girls (mean age?=?60.24 months, SD?=?7.81). Both peer nominations and teacher ratings of aggression were obtained for these children. Ten years later, the majority of these children (72.2%; n?=?153) completed a longitudinal follow-up battery of assessments. Included in these measures was a self-reported measure of aggression as well as an assessment of the extent to which these adolescents disclosed to and concealed information from their parents. Separate models were estimated by gender of child for the 153 children who participated in both Time 1 and Time 2 data collections. Preschool physical aggression proved an important longitudinal predictor of adolescent disclosure and concealment for girls. Concurrently, self-rated relational aggression was also significantly associated with concealment for both boys and girls.
PubMed ID
23720152 View in PubMed
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Adolescent ecstasy and other drug use in the National Survey of Parents and Youth: the role of sensation-seeking, parental monitoring and peer's drug use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93413
Source
Addict Behav. 2008 Jul;33(7):919-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Martins Silvia S
Storr Carla L
Alexandre Pierre K
Chilcoat Howard D
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205-1900, USA. smartins@jhsph.edu
Source
Addict Behav. 2008 Jul;33(7):919-33
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Amphetamine-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Female
Hallucinogens
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Marijuana Abuse - epidemiology - psychology
N-Methyl-3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine
Norway - epidemiology
Parent-Child Relations
Peer Group
Tobacco Use Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
The association between high sensation-seeking, close friends' drug use and low parental monitoring with ecstasy (MDMA) use in adolescence was examined in a sample of US household-dwelling adolescents aged 12-18 years (N=5049). We also tested whether associations were of stronger magnitude than associations between these correlates and marijuana or alcohol/tobacco use in adolescence. Data from Round 2 of the National Survey of Parents and Youth (NSPY) Restricted Use Files (RUF) was analyzed via Jackknife weighted multinomial logistic regression models. High sensation-seekers were more likely to be ecstasy, marijuana, and alcohol/tobacco users, respectively, as compared to low sensation-seekers. High sensation-seeking and close friends' drug use were more strongly associated with ecstasy as compared to marijuana and alcohol/tobacco use. Low parental monitoring was associated with marijuana use and alcohol/tobacco use and there was a trend for it to be associated with ecstasy use. Ecstasy use is strongly associated with peer drug use and more modestly associated with high sensation-seeking. School prevention programs should target high-sensation-seeking adolescents and also encourage them to affiliate with non-drug using peers.
PubMed ID
18355973 View in PubMed
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610 records – page 1 of 61.