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1991 records – page 1 of 200.

The 1 alpha-hydroxylase locus is not linked to calcium stone formation or calciuric phenotypes in French-Canadian families.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206213
Source
J Am Soc Nephrol. 1998 Mar;9(3):425-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998
Author
P. Scott
D. Ouimet
Y. Proulx
M L Trouvé
G. Guay
B. Gagnon
L. Valiquette
A. Bonnardeaux
Author Affiliation
Service de Néphrologie, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Am Soc Nephrol. 1998 Mar;9(3):425-32
Date
Mar-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 1-alpha-Hydroxylase - genetics - metabolism
Adult
Calcium - urine
Canada
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Family Health
Female
France - ethnology
Genetic Linkage
Genetic Markers - genetics
Humans
Kidney Calculi - enzymology - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Nuclear Family
Pedigree
Phenotype
Vitamin D - blood
Abstract
Calcium urolithiasis is often associated with increased intestinal absorption and urine excretion of calcium, and has been suggested to result from increased vitamin D production. The role of the enzyme 1 alpha-hydroxylase, the rate-limiting step in active vitamin D production, was evaluated in 36 families, including 28 sibships with at least a pair of affected sibs, using qualitative and quantitative trait linkage analyses. Sibs with a verified calcium urolithiasis passage (n = 117) had higher 24-h calciuria (P = 0.03), oxaluria (P = 0.02), fasting and postcalcium loading urine calcium/creatinine (Ca/cr) ratios (P = 0.008 and P = 0.002, respectively), and serum 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D levels (P = 0.02) compared with nonstone-forming sibs (n = 120). Markers from a 9-centiMorgan interval encompassing the VDD1 locus on chromosome 12q13-14 (putative 1 alpha-hydroxylase) were analyzed in 28 sibships (146 sib pairs) of single and recurrent stone formers and in 14 sibships (65 sib pairs) with recurrent-only (> or = 3 episodes) stone-forming sibs. Two-point and multipoint analyses did not reveal excess in alleles shared among affected sibs at the VDD1 locus. Linkage of stone formation to the VDD1 locus could be excluded, respectively, with a lambda d of 2.0 (single and recurrent stone formers) and 3.25 (recurrent stone formers). Quantitative trait analyses revealed no evidence for linkage to 24-h calciuria and oxaluria, serum 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D levels, and Ca/cr ratios. This study shows absence of linkage of the putative 1 alpha-hydroxylase locus to calcium stone formation or to quantitative traits associated with idiopathic hypercalciuria. In addition, there is coaggregation of calciuric and oxaluric phenotypes with stone formation.
PubMed ID
9513904 View in PubMed
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2B or not to be--the 45-year saga of the Montreal Platelet Syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140851
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2010 Nov;104(5):903-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Man-Chiu Poon
Margaret L Rand
Shannon C Jackson
Author Affiliation
Division of Hematology and Hematologic Malignancies, Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. mcpoon@ucalgary.ca
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2010 Nov;104(5):903-10
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Coagulation - genetics
Blood Coagulation Tests - history
Blood Platelet Disorders - blood - genetics - history
Blood Platelets - metabolism - pathology
Canada
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
History, 20th Century
Humans
Mutation
Pedigree
Phenotype
Platelet Function Tests - history
Syndrome
von Willebrand Disease, Type 2 - blood - genetics - history
von Willebrand Factor - genetics - history
Abstract
Over 45 years ago, Montreal Platelet Syndrome was first described as a rare inherited platelet disorder characterised by macrothrombocytopenia with spontaneous platelet clumping, abnormal platelet shape change upon stimulation and a defect in platelet calpain. This syndrome has now been reclassified as type 2B von Willebrand disease with the V1316M VWF mutation in the only kindred ever reported. We herein revisit the historical platelet characteristics originally described in Montreal Platelet Syndrome in light of the new diagnosis. This paper will review the 45-year saga of Montreal Platelet Syndrome, a story that highlights the value of revisiting a rare diagnosis to look for a more common explanation.
PubMed ID
20838735 View in PubMed
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A 9.6 kilobase deletion in the low density lipoprotein receptor gene in Norwegian familial hypercholesterolemia subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36531
Source
Clin Genet. 1992 Dec;42(6):288-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1992
Author
O K Rødningen
O. Røsby
S. Tonstad
L. Ose
K. Berg
T P Leren
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Genetics, Ullevål Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Clin Genet. 1992 Dec;42(6):288-95
Date
Dec-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Base Sequence
Blotting, Southern
Child
Cholesterol - blood
DNA - analysis
Exons - genetics
Female
Haplotypes
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia, Familial - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Molecular Sequence Data
Norway
Pedigree
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Receptors, LDL - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Sequence Deletion
Xanthomatosis - etiology
Abstract
Haplotype analysis of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene was performed in Norwegian subjects heterozygous for familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). Southern blot analysis of genomic DNA, using an exon 18 specific probe and the restriction enzyme NcoI, showed that two out of 57 unrelated FH subjects had an abnormal 3.6 kb band. Further analyses revealed that this abnormal band was due to a 9.6 kb deletion that included exons 16 and 17. The 5' deletion breakpoint was after 245 bp of intron 15, and the 3' deletion breakpoint was in exon 18 after nucleotide 3390 of cDNA. Thus, both the membrane-spanning and cytoplasmatic domains of the receptor had been deleted. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was developed to identify this deletion among other Norwegian FH subjects. As a result of this screening one additional subject was found out of 124 subjects screened. Thus, three out of 181 (1.7%) unrelated Norwegian FH subject possessed this deletion. The deletion was found on the same haplotype in the three unrelated subjects, suggesting a common mutagenic event. The deletion is identical to a deletion (FH-Helsinki) that is very common among Finnish FH subjects. However, it is not yet known whether the mutations evolved separately in the two countries.
PubMed ID
1362925 View in PubMed
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The 14q restless legs syndrome locus in the French Canadian population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179886
Source
Ann Neurol. 2004 Jun;55(6):887-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Anastasia Levchenko
Jacques-Yves Montplaisir
Marie-Pierre Dubé
Jean-Baptiste Riviere
Judith St-Onge
Gustavo Turecki
Lan Xiong
Pascale Thibodeau
Alex Desautels
Dominique J Verlaan
Guy A Rouleau
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research in Neuroscience, McGill University Health Centre Research Institute, Montreal General Hospital, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Ann Neurol. 2004 Jun;55(6):887-91
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Chromosome Mapping
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 14 - genetics
Family Health
Female
France - ethnology
Genes, Dominant
Genes, Recessive
Genetic Linkage
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Humans
Lod Score
Male
Pedigree
Restless Legs Syndrome - genetics
Abstract
A new restless legs syndrome locus on chromosome 14 recently has been reported in one family of Italian origin. Our study aimed to replicate this finding and determine the importance of this locus in the French Canadian population. Markers spanning the region were genotyped in 14 large families and linkage assessed using two-point and multipoint logarithm of odds scores. Possible linkage to this locus was found in one of our kindreds providing support for the existence of this locus and indicating that this locus may be responsible for a small fraction of French Canadian restless legs syndrome.
PubMed ID
15174026 View in PubMed
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657del5 mutation in the gene for Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS1) in a cohort of Russian children with lymphoid tissue malignancies and controls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184730
Source
Am J Med Genet A. 2003 Jul 15;120A(2):174-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-15-2003
Author
Igor B Resnick
Irina Kondratenko
Eugeni Pashanov
Alexey A Maschan
Alexander Karachunsky
Oleg Togoev
Andrey Timakov
Alexander Polyakov
Svetlana Tverskaya
Oleg Evgrafov
Alexander G Roumiantsev
Author Affiliation
Department of Immunology, Research Institute for Paediatric Hematology, Moscow, Russia. gashka@hadassah.org.il
Source
Am J Med Genet A. 2003 Jul 15;120A(2):174-9
Date
Jul-15-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Base Sequence
Child
Child, Preschool
Chromosome Breakage - genetics
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 8
Cohort Studies
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Testing
Heterozygote
Humans
Loss of Heterozygosity
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - genetics - pathology
Lymphoproliferative Disorders - genetics - pathology
Male
Mutation
Pedigree
Pilot Projects
Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma - genetics - pathology
Russia
Sequence Deletion
Syndrome
Abstract
Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS, OMIM 251260) is a rare hereditary disease, characterized by immune deficiency, microcephaly, and an extremely high incidence of lymphoid tissue malignancies. The gene mutated in NBS, NBS1, was recently cloned from its location on chromosome 8q21. The encoded protein, nibrin (p95), together with hMre11 and hRad50, is involved in the double-strand DNA break repair system. We screened two Russian cohorts for the 657del5 NBS1 mutation and found no carriers in 548 controls and two carriers in 68 patients with lymphoid malignancies: one with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and one with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Several relatives of the second patient, who were carriers of the same mutation, had cancer (ALL, breast cancer, GI cancers). These preliminary data suggest that NBS1 mutation carriers can be predisposed to malignant disorders.
PubMed ID
12833396 View in PubMed
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The 4154delA mutation carriers in the BRCA1 gene share a common ancestry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153810
Source
Fam Cancer. 2009;8(1):1-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Silvija Ozolina
Olga Sinicka
Eriks Jankevics
Inna Inashkina
Jan Lubinski
Bohdan Gorski
Jacek Gronwald
Tatyana Nasedkina
Olga Fedorova
Ludmila Lyubchenko
Laima Tihomirova
Author Affiliation
Latvian Biomedical Research and Study Centre, Ratsupites str. 1, Riga, 1067, Latvia.
Source
Fam Cancer. 2009;8(1):1-4
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - genetics
DNA Mutational Analysis
Female
Founder Effect
Genes, BRCA1
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Haplotypes
Humans
Latvia
Male
Microsatellite Repeats
Mutation
Pedigree
Poland
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Polymorphism, Single-Stranded Conformational
Russia
Abstract
Uncertainty exists whether the 4154delA mutation of the BRCA1 gene detected in unrelated individuals from Latvia, Poland and Russia is a founder mutation with a common ancestral origin. To trace back this problem we analysed the mutation-associated haplotype of the BRCA1 intragenic SNPs as well as intragenic and nearby STR markers in mutation carriers from the aforementioned populations. The mutation-associated SNP alleles were found to be "T-A-A-A-A-G" for six intragenic SNPs of the BRCA1 gene (IVS8-58delT, 3232A/G, 3667A/G, IVS16-68A/G, IVS16-92A/G, IVS18+66G/A, respectively). The alleles 195, 154, 210 and 181 were found to be associated with the 4154delA mutation for STR markers D17S1325, D17S855, D17S1328 and D17S1320, correspondingly. Further analysis of markers in the 4154delA mutation carriers from all three populations allows us to assert that all analysed mutation carriers share a common ancestry.
PubMed ID
19067236 View in PubMed
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Abdominal aortic diameter is increased in males with a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysms: results from the Danish VIVA-trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260407
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2014 Dec;48(6):669-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
T M M Joergensen
K. Houlind
A. Green
J S Lindholt
Source
Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg. 2014 Dec;48(6):669-75
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aorta, Abdominal - ultrasonography
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - epidemiology - genetics - ultrasonography
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dilatation, Pathologic
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Heredity
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Pedigree
Phenotype
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
To investigate, at a population level, whether a family history of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is independently related to increased aortic diameter and prevalence of AAA in men, and to elucidate whether the mean aortic diameter and the prevalence of AAA are different between participants with male and female relatives with AAA.
Observational population-based cross-sectional study.
18,614 male participants screened for AAA in the VIVA-trial 2008-2011 with information on both family history of AAA and maximal aortic diameter.
Standardized ultrasound scan measurement of maximum antero-posterior aortic diameter. Family history obtained by questionnaire. Multivariate regression analysis was used to test for confounders: age, sex, smoking, comorbidity and medication.
From the screened cohort, 569 participants had at least one first degree relative diagnosed with AAA, and 38 had AAA. Participants with a family history of AAA (+FH) had a significantly larger mean maximum aortic diameter (20.50 mm) compared with participants without family history of AAA (-FH) (19.07 mm, p
PubMed ID
25443525 View in PubMed
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[Absence of the palmar c triradius. Dermatoglyphic and geneologic study of a genetic character transmitted since the 17th century in a Quebec family].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242476
Source
Ann Genet. 1983;26(3):174-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1983
Author
F B Genest
P. Genest
Source
Ann Genet. 1983;26(3):174-6
Date
1983
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chromosome Aberrations
Chromosome Disorders
Dermatoglyphics
Female
Fingers - abnormalities - radiography
Foot - radiography
France - ethnology
Hand - radiography
Humans
Male
Pedigree
Phenotype
Quebec
Sex Chromosomes
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
A dermatoglyphic research on the absence of the palmar c-triradius was carried out in a Canadian family line originating from a French married couple who settled in the Quebec City area in 1649. Of the 51 individuals examined, 34 showed that c-triradius was missing on one or both palms. The study of the family tree and of the data confirms the hypothesis that an absent palmar c-triradius is an autosomal dominant trait transmitted by an heterozygous genotype with, in the present observation, an incidence of 66,6% and an estimated penetrance of 44,1%.
PubMed ID
6606380 View in PubMed
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Accurate Non-parametric Estimation of Recent Effective Population Size from Segments of Identity by Descent.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268195
Source
Am J Hum Genet. 2015 Sep 3;97(3):404-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-3-2015
Author
Sharon R Browning
Brian L Browning
Source
Am J Hum Genet. 2015 Sep 3;97(3):404-18
Date
Sep-3-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chromosomes - genetics
Computer simulation
Finland
Genetics, Population - methods
Great Britain
Humans
Linkage Disequilibrium
Models, Genetic
Pedigree
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Population Density
Software
Abstract
Existing methods for estimating historical effective population size from genetic data have been unable to accurately estimate effective population size during the most recent past. We present a non-parametric method for accurately estimating recent effective population size by using inferred long segments of identity by descent (IBD). We found that inferred segments of IBD contain information about effective population size from around 4 generations to around 50 generations ago for SNP array data and to over 200 generations ago for sequence data. In human populations that we examined, the estimates of effective size were approximately one-third of the census size. We estimate the effective population size of European-ancestry individuals in the UK four generations ago to be eight million and the effective population size of Finland four generations ago to be 0.7 million. Our method is implemented in the open-source IBDNe software package.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26299365 View in PubMed
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[A clinico-epidemiological analysis of Huntington's chorea in the population of Astrakhan].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222331
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1993;93(5):9-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993

1991 records – page 1 of 200.