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196 records – page 1 of 20.

[50th anniversary of the Chair of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine of the Order of Lenin central Institute of Graduate Training of Physicians].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240287
Source
Gig Sanit. 1984 Aug;(8):38-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1984

[Account for facts on pediatric surgery!]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36364
Source
Lakartidningen. 1993 Feb 10;90(6):460
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-10-1993
Author
U. Haglund
B. Hjelmqvist
Source
Lakartidningen. 1993 Feb 10;90(6):460
Date
Feb-10-1993
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Humans
Pediatrics - education - standards
Specialties, Surgical - standards
Sweden
Notes
Comment On: Lakartidningen. 1993 Jan 6;90(1-2):13-48421393
PubMed ID
8437443 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accuracy of clinical assessment of heart murmurs by office based (general practice) paediatricians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200598
Source
Arch Dis Child. 1999 Nov;81(5):409-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
I. Haney
M. Ipp
W. Feldman
B W McCrindle
Author Affiliation
Division of Pediatric Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Toronto, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X8, Canada.
Source
Arch Dis Child. 1999 Nov;81(5):409-12
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Clinical Competence
Education, Medical, Continuing
Educational Status
Female
Heart Murmurs - diagnosis
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Pediatrics - education - standards
Physical Examination - standards
Referral and Consultation
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
To determine the diagnostic accuracy of physical examination by office based (general practice) paediatricians in the evaluation of heart murmurs.
Each of 30 office based paediatricians blindly examined a random sample of children with murmurs (43% of which were pathological). Sensitivity and specificity were calculated and were related to paediatricians' characteristics.
Mean (SD) sensitivity was 82 (24)% with a mean specificity of 72 (24)% in differentiating pathological from innocent murmurs, with further investigations requested for 54% of assessments. The addition of a referral strategy would have increased mean sensitivity to 87 (20)% and specificity to 98 (8)%. Diagnostic accuracy was not significantly related to the paediatricians' age, education or practice characteristics, but was related to referral practices and confidence in assessment.
Diagnostic accuracy of clinical assessment of heart murmurs by office based paediatricians is suboptimal, and educational strategies are needed to improve accuracy and reduce unnecessary referrals and misdiagnosis.
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1967 May 4;276(18):1008-136022469
Cites: Int J Cardiol. 1988 Apr;19(1):107-133372064
Cites: Pediatrics. 1990 Oct;86(4):497-5002216611
Cites: Eur J Pediatr. 1991 Jul;150(9):623-61915512
Cites: BMJ. 1992 Nov 21;305(6864):1264-51477570
Cites: Am Heart J. 1960 Jun;59:844-5513823663
Cites: Eur J Pediatr. 1995 Jan;154(1):15-77895749
Cites: Clin Pediatr (Phila). 1995 Jan;34(1):25-317720325
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1996 Feb;150(2):169-748556121
Cites: Acta Paediatr. 1995 Dec;84(12):1379-818645955
Cites: Pediatrics. 1997 Jan;99(1):1-38989329
Cites: Am J Dis Child. 1993 Sep;147(9):975-78362816
PubMed ID
10519714 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A course in medical ethics--a pain in the neck for the clinicians?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208988
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Mar 20;117(8):1138-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-1997
Author
R. Førde
S. Lie
O G Aasland
Author Affiliation
Legeforeningens forskningsinstitutt, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Mar 20;117(8):1138-40
Date
Mar-20-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Education, Medical, Continuing
Ethics, Medical
Humans
Norway
Pediatrics - education - manpower
Questionnaires
Abstract
Last year, a course in clinical medical ethics for paediatricians had to be cancelled owing to lack of interest. To find the reason for this, and to learn what ethical problems the physicians encountered in the course of their work, how they solved them, and their attitude towards education in medical ethics, a questionnaire was sent to all members of The Norwegian Paediatric Association, to be answered anonymously. The most frequent excuses for not attending the course were pressure of work and lack of time. 37% claimed that they very often or often encountered ethical problems during their work. 20% often solved these problems alone, and two out of three after discussing them with colleagues. 51% felt a need to improve their competence to solve ethical problems. Only 16% reported having no such need. The authors discuss the form and content of the education in medical ethics.
PubMed ID
9148483 View in PubMed
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[A course on pediatric allergology in Reykjavik: the biggest problem is underdiagnosis and undertreatment of asthmatic symptoms]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16149
Source
Lakartidningen. 1989 Mar 15;86(11):953-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-1989

[A developmental project at the pediatric department in Orebro. Physicians were asked to assess their own competence]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33689
Source
Lakartidningen. 1998 Sep 2;95(36):3792-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2-1998

[A method of conducting practical work in pediatrics with students of the Chair of Therapeutics at a pediatric polyclinic].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231525
Source
Pediatriia. 1989;(7):79-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989

Analysis of clinical bioethics teaching in pediatric surgery residency.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206321
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 1998 Feb;33(2):373-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1998
Author
M L Robin
D A Caniano
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, The Ohio State University College of Medicine, and Children's Hospital, Columbus 43205, USA.
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 1998 Feb;33(2):373-7
Date
Feb-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Bioethics
Canada
Child
Curriculum
Ethics, Medical - education
Female
General Surgery - education
Humans
Infant
Internship and Residency
Male
Pediatrics - education
Physicians - psychology
Questionnaires
Teaching - methods
United States
Abstract
Although clinical bioethics teaching (CBT) is not a required component of the essential curriculum for pediatric surgery residency, ethical considerations often accompany surgical decision making for infants and children. This study was designed to quantitate CBT during pediatric surgery residency (PSR) and to determine preferences about formal bioethics instruction.
An 80-item questionnaire was mailed to 140 graduates of accredited PSR in the United States and Canada. Questions included demographic data, experience in CBT during and after PSR, preferred topics and teaching methods, and self-assessed and objective competency in bioethics.
The response rate was 78% (n = 109); 72% completed PSR between 1990 and 1995 (mean, 1991). Formal CBT within the curriculum of PSR was reported by 9% of respondents; lecture and consultation with an ethicist were the most frequent teaching methods. Informal CBT was noted by 88% of pediatric surgeons; observation of patient cases with ethical dilemmas was the primary mode of instruction. Quality of life, withholding/withdrawal of care, informed consent, child abuse, and economics ranked highest for most important CBT topics, while euthanasia, clinical research trials, and cultural diversity were given low priority. The preferred teaching methods were case-based discussions and consultation with an ethicist. Although 97% favored additional CBT in all postgraduate training, respondents who completed advanced study in medical ethics (P
PubMed ID
9498421 View in PubMed
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Analysis of workforce, distribution of care, and practice preference in pediatric plastic surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201676
Source
J Craniofac Surg. 1999 Jan;10(1):3-9; discussion 10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
S E Brotherton
M B Habal
Author Affiliation
American Academy of Pediatrics, Elk Grove, Illinois 60007-1098, USA.
Source
J Craniofac Surg. 1999 Jan;10(1):3-9; discussion 10
Date
Jan-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Economic Competition
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Middle Aged
Pediatrics - education - manpower
Physician's Practice Patterns
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation
Societies, Medical
Surgery, Oral - manpower
Surgery, Plastic - education - manpower
United States
Abstract
To determine the future needs in manpower for pediatric care as it relates to pediatric specialists, a study was conducted by the American Academy of Pediatrics to see the needs of manpower that will provide access of pediatric care to all. A pediatric plastic surgery survey was set in the form of a list of questions that was mailed to the respective societies with pediatric plastic surgeons as members. The survey was reviewed, and the results were studied. The outcome is presented in the form of findings related to the overall practice of plastic surgery. Based on the percentage of pediatric care that is provided, there were two types of pediatric plastic surgeons. Those with the high percentage of pediatric care tend to stay near health science centers; however, both groups tend to spend time (each to a different extent) tending to other plastic surgery problems. Today we have adequate access to care in the health system for pediatric plastic surgery problems despite the shift in the health care environment. Managed care continues to use the pediatrician as a "gatekeeper" in determining the overall access for patients with problems related to pediatric plastic surgery.
PubMed ID
10388420 View in PubMed
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Are physicians with better clinical skills on licensing examinations less likely to prescribe antibiotics for viral respiratory infections in ambulatory care settings?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138131
Source
Med Care. 2011 Feb;49(2):156-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Genevieve Cadieux
Michal Abrahamowicz
Dale Dauphinee
Robyn Tamblyn
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. genevieve.cadieux@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
Med Care. 2011 Feb;49(2):156-65
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Ambulatory Care - organization & administration
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Clinical Competence - statistics & numerical data
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Educational Measurement
Female
General Practice - education - organization & administration
Health Services Research
Humans
Insurance Claim Reporting - statistics & numerical data
Licensure, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Patient Selection
Pediatrics - education - organization & administration
Physician's Practice Patterns - organization & administration
Quebec
Respiratory Tract Infections - drug therapy - virology
Sex Factors
Workload - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Viral respiratory infections (VRIs) are a common reason for ambulatory visits, and 35% are treated with an antibiotic. Antibiotic use for VRIs is not recommended, and it promotes antibiotic resistance. Effective patient-physician communication is critical to address this problem. Recognizing the importance of physician communication skills, licensure examinations were reformed in the United States and Canada to evaluate these skills.
To assess whether physician clinical and communication skills, as measured by the Canadian clinical skills examination (CSE), predict antibiotic prescribing for VRI in ambulatory care.
A total of 442 Quebec general practitioners and pediatricians who wrote the CSE in 1993-1996 were followed from 1993 to 2007, and their 159,456 VRI visits were identified from physician claims.
The outcome was an antibiotic prescription from a study physician dispensed within 7 days of the VRI visit. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to estimate the association between antibiotic prescribing for VRI and CSE score, adjusting for physician, patient, and encounter characteristics.
Better clinical and communication skills were associated with a reduction in the risk of antibiotic prescribing, but only for female physicians. Every 1-standard deviation increase in CSE score was associated with a 19% reduction in the risk of antibiotic prescribing (risk ratio, 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.68-0.97). Better clinical skills were associated with an even greater reduction in risk among female physicians with higher workloads (risk ratio, 0.48; 95% confidence interval, 0.29-0.79).
Physician clinical and communication skills are important determinants of antibiotic prescribing for VRI and should be targeted by future interventions.
Notes
Erratum In: Med Care. 2011 May;49(5):527-8
PubMed ID
21206293 View in PubMed
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196 records – page 1 of 20.