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Calibration and cross-validation of a wrist-worn Actigraph in young preschoolers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266784
Source
Pediatr Obes. 2015 Feb;10(1):1-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2015
Author
E. Johansson
U. Ekelund
H. Nero
C. Marcus
M. Hagströmer
Source
Pediatr Obes. 2015 Feb;10(1):1-6
Date
Feb-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actigraphy - instrumentation
Calibration
Child, Preschool
Feasibility Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Monitoring, Ambulatory - instrumentation
Motor Activity
Pediatric Obesity - prevention & control
Play and Playthings
Reproducibility of Results
Sedentary lifestyle
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Wrist
Abstract
To calibrate the Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometer for wrist-worn placement in young preschoolers by developing intensity thresholds for sedentary, low- and high-intensity physical activity. Furthermore, to cross-validate the developed thresholds in young preschoolers.
Actigraph GT3X+ was used to measure physical activity during structured activities and free play in 38 children (15-36 months). Activity was video recorded and scored into sedentary, low- and high-intensity physical activity based on Children's Activity Rating Scale (CARS) and combined with accelerometer data using a 5?s epoch. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to develop intensity thresholds in 26 randomly selected children. The remaining 12 children were used for cross-validation.
Intensity thresholds for sedentary were =89 vertical counts (Y) and =221 vector magnitude (VM) counts per 5?s and =440 Y counts and =730 VM counts per 5?s for high-intensity physical activity. Sensitivity and specificity were 60-100% for the developed intensity thresholds. Strong correlations (Spearman rank correlation 0.69-0.91) were found in the cross-validation sample between the developed thresholds for the accelerometer and CARS scoring time in all intensity categories.
The developed intensity thresholds appear valid to categorize sedentary behaviour and physical activity intensity categories in children 2 years of age.
Notes
Comment In: Pediatr Obes. 2015 Feb;10(1):74-625074290
Comment In: Pediatr Obes. 2015 Aug;10(4):32825074065
PubMed ID
24408275 View in PubMed
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Changes and tracking of fruit, vegetables and sugar-sweetened beverages intake from 18 months to 7 years in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265498
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:793
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Mona Bjelland
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Margaretha Haugen
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Wenche Nystad
Lene Frost Andersen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:793
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Beverages
Child
Child Health Services
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Educational Status
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Health Behavior
Humans
Infant
Logistic Models
Male
Mother-Child Relations
Norway - epidemiology
Pediatric Obesity - prevention & control
Public Health
Questionnaires
Vegetables
Abstract
A few studies have investigated tracking of dietary patterns or nutrient intake in pre-school children, but no studies have been identified examining tracking of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB), fruit and vegetable intakes in early childhood (1-7 year olds). The purpose of this study was to investigate changes and tracking of intakes of fruit, vegetables and SSB, and association between maternal education and dietary tracking, from 18 months to 7 years of age.
Longitudinal data from the nation-wide Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health were used, including 9025 children participating at three time points (18 months, 36 months and 7 years). Frequencies of fruit, vegetables and SSB were assessed by questionnaire. Slightly different questions were used at each time point to collect information about intake. Maternal education was categorized into =?12 years, 13-16 years, =?17 years. Cross-tabulation, Spearman's rho and multinomial logistic regression were used for assessing change, tracking and differences by maternal education.
Analyses by gender indicated largest changes for intake of fruit and SSB from age 18 months to 7 years. Fair to moderate tracking coefficients (Spearman's rho = 0.23-0.46) for intake of fruit, vegetables and SSB were found and children assigned to low, medium and high frequency of consumption at 18 months continued to be in the same group at age 36 months and 7 years. Children of mothers with low education consumed fruit and vegetables less often and SSB more often compared to children of mothers with high education at 18 months of age. Children with higher educated mothers had lower odds for increasing fruit intake or decreasing SSB intake, compared to children with lower educated mothers showing a stable intake.
The tracking coefficients for intakes were fair to moderate and differences in intakes according to maternal education were found already at age 18 months. This suggests that promotion of healthy dietary behaviours at an early age is important to prevent unfavourable dietary behaviours later in childhood. Moreover, it seems important to target mothers in nutrition interventions for improving dietary habits among children.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24103398 View in PubMed
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Changes to the school food and physical activity environment after guideline implementation in British Columbia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256767
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2014;11:50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Allison W Watts
Louise C Mâsse
Patti-Jean Naylor
Author Affiliation
School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, F508-4480 Oak Street, Vancouver, British Columbia V6H 3V4, Canada. lmasse@cfri.ubc.ca.
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2014;11:50
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
British Columbia
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environment
Food Services - standards
Fruit
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Motor Activity
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Status
Pediatric Obesity - prevention & control
Physical Education and Training
Regression Analysis
Residence Characteristics
Schools
Socioeconomic Factors
Students
Vegetables
Abstract
High rates of childhood obesity have generated interest among policy makers to improve the school food environment and increase students' levels of physical activity. The purpose of this study was to examine school-level changes associated with implementation of the Food and Beverage Sales in Schools (FBSS) and Daily Physical Activity (DPA) guidelines in British Columbia, Canada.
Elementary and middle/high school principals completed a survey on the school food and physical activity environment in 2007-08 (N=513) and 2011-12 (N=490). Hierarchical mixed effects regression was used to examine changes in: 1) availability of food and beverages; 2) minutes per day of Physical Education (PE); 3) delivery method of PE; and 4) school community support. Models controlled for school enrollment and community type, education and income.
After policy implementation was expected, more elementary schools provided access to fruits and vegetables and less to 100% fruit juice. Fewer middle/high schools provided access to sugar-sweetened beverages, French fries, baked goods, salty snacks and chocolate/candy. Schools were more likely to meet 150 min/week of PE for grade 6 students, and offer more minutes of PE per week for grade 8 and 10 students including changes to PE delivery method. School community support for nutrition and physical activity policies increased over time.
Positive changes to the school food environment occurred after schools were expected to implement the FBSS and DPA guidelines. Reported changes to the school environment are encouraging and provide support for guidelines and policies that focus on increasing healthy eating and physical activity in schools.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24731514 View in PubMed
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Childhood obesity prevention: a review of school nurse perceptions and practices.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262834
Source
J Spec Pediatr Nurs. 2014 Jul;19(3):198-209
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Susan B Quelly
Source
J Spec Pediatr Nurs. 2014 Jul;19(3):198-209
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Pediatric Obesity - prevention & control
Perception
School Health Services - organization & administration
School Nursing - methods - organization & administration
Self Efficacy
Sweden
United States
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of this review is to examine key school nurse perceptions that may promote or deter school nurse involvement in childhood obesity prevention (COP) practices.
Ten research articles were identified through a systematic review of the literature. School nurse participation in COP is inconsistent, and this variation is not well understood. Some variations in COP practices may be explained by differences in self-efficacy, perceived benefits, and perceived barriers.
Efforts are needed to develop and implement interventions and policies to modify those perceptions that may promote school nurse active engagement in COP practices.
PubMed ID
24612520 View in PubMed
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Children's Healthy Living Program (CHL) Indigenous Workforce Training to Prevent Childhood Obesity in the Underserved U.S. Affiliated Pacific Region.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278679
Source
J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2015 May;26(2 Suppl):83-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Marie Kainoa Fialkowski
Treena Delormier
Margaret Hattori-Uchima
Jodi Haunani Leslie
Joshua Greenberg
Jang Ho Kim
Jonathan L Deenik
Michael A Dunn
I Apulu Areta
Rachel Novotny
Source
J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2015 May;26(2 Suppl):83-95
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Child
Hawaii
Health Personnel - education
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Medically underserved area
Micronesia
Pediatric Obesity - prevention & control
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
The U.S. Affiliated Pacific Region (USAPR) is an underserved region with high rates of obesity-related, non-communicable diseases and a low proportion of trained obesity prevention professionals, especially indigenous professionals. The Children's Healthy Living Training Program was developed to enhance the USAPR's capacity to address childhood obesity prevention.
PubMed ID
25981090 View in PubMed
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A community engagement process identifies environmental priorities to prevent early childhood obesity: the Children's Healthy Living (CHL) program for remote underserved populations in the US Affiliated Pacific Islands, Hawaii and Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265840
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2014 Dec;18(10):2261-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Marie Kainoa Fialkowski
Barbara DeBaryshe
Andrea Bersamin
Claudio Nigg
Rachael Leon Guerrero
Gena Rojas
Aufa'i Apulu Ropeti Areta
Agnes Vargo
Tayna Belyeu-Camacho
Rose Castro
Bret Luick
Rachel Novotny
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2014 Dec;18(10):2261-74
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska
Child
Child, Preschool
Community-Based Participatory Research
Family
Female
Hawaii
Health Education - methods
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Male
Minority Groups
Pacific Islands
Parents
Pediatric Obesity - prevention & control
Program Development
Residence Characteristics
Social Environment
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
Underserved minority populations in the US Affiliated Pacific Islands (USAPI), Hawaii, and Alaska display disproportionate rates of childhood obesity. The region's unique circumstance should be taken into account when designing obesity prevention interventions. The purpose of this paper is to (a), describe the community engagement process (CEP) used by the Children's Healthy Living (CHL) Program for remote underserved minority populations in the USAPI, Hawaii, and Alaska (b) report community-identified priorities for an environmental intervention addressing early childhood (ages 2-8 years) obesity, and (c) share lessons learned in the CEP. Four communities in each of five CHL jurisdictions (Alaska, American Samoa, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Guam, Hawai'i) were selected to participate in the community-randomized matched-pair trial. Over 900 community members including parents, teachers, and community leaders participated in the CEP over a 14 month period. The CEP was used to identify environmental intervention priorities to address six behavioral outcomes: increasing fruit/vegetable consumption, water intake, physical activity and sleep; and decreasing screen time and intake of sugar sweetened beverages. Community members were engaged through Local Advisory Committees, key informant interviews and participatory community meetings. Community-identified priorities centered on policy development; role modeling; enhancing access to healthy food, clean water, and physical activity venues; and healthy living education. Through the CEP, CHL identified culturally appropriate priorities for intervention that were also consistent with the literature on effective obesity prevention practices. Results of the CEP will guide the CHL intervention design and implementation. The CHL CEP may serve as a model for other underserved minority island populations.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24043557 View in PubMed
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Early food for future health: a randomized controlled trial evaluating the effect of an eHealth intervention aiming to promote healthy food habits from early childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290059
Source
BMC Public Health. 2017 09 20; 17(1):729
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-20-2017
Author
Christine Helle
Elisabet Rudjord Hillesund
Mona Linge Omholt
Nina Cecilie Øverby
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Sport and Nutrition, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, PO Box 422, 4604, Kristiansand, Norway. christine.helle@uia.no.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2017 09 20; 17(1):729
Date
09-20-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Feeding Behavior
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Promotion - methods
Healthy Diet - psychology
Humans
Infant
Male
Norway
Pediatric Obesity - prevention & control
Program Evaluation
Surveys and Questionnaires
Telemedicine
Abstract
Childhood overweight and obesity is a global public health challenge. Primary prevention initiatives targeting parents have been called for to encourage a positive feeding environment and healthy eating habits that may lay a good foundation for future health. At the same time, there is a need for interventions which combine accessibility and scalability with cost effectiveness. Today's parents are extensive Internet-users, but only a few randomized controlled trials have investigated the use of Internet to promote healthy eating habits in early childhood. In Early Food for Future Health we have developed and will evaluate an Internet-based tool for parents of children between 6 and 12 months, aiming to increase knowledge about infant nutrition and foster protective feeding behavior.
During springtime 2016, parents of children aged between 3 and 5 months were recruited through Norwegian child health centres and announcements on Facebook. After completing the baseline questionnaire, 718 parents were individually randomized to intervention- or control group. The intervention group received monthly emails with links to an age-appropriate web-site when their child was between 6 and 12 months. The control group received ordinary care from the child health centres. The data-collection is ongoing. All participants will be followed up at ages 12 and possibly 24 and 48 months, with questionnaires relating to eating behaviour and feeding practices, food variety and diet quality.
Providing guidance and counseling to parents of infants is an important task for health authorities and the public child health services. Early Food for Future health is an intervention focusing on promoting early healthy food-habits which may prevent childhood overweight and obesity. If proven to be effective, Early Food for Future Health can be used by parents and public health nurses for supplementary guidance on feeding practices and diet. This study has the potential to provide greater insight and understanding regarding early parental feeding practices, child eating behavior and the development and efficacy of Internet-based public health interventions.
ISRCTN13601567 .
Notes
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PubMed ID
28931384 View in PubMed
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Effectiveness of a universal parental support programme to promote health behaviours and prevent overweight and obesity in 6-year-old children in disadvantaged areas, the Healthy School Start Study II, a cluster-randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275385
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2016;13:4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Gisela Nyberg
Åsa Norman
Elinor Sundblom
Zangin Zeebari
Liselotte Schäfer Elinder
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2016;13:4
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accelerometry
Body Weight
Child
Diet
Exercise
Female
Health Behavior
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Male
Motivational Interviewing
Overweight - prevention & control
Parents
Pediatric Obesity - prevention & control
Poverty
School Health Services
Schools
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
There is increasing evidence for the effectiveness of parental support programmes to promote healthy behaviours and prevent obesity in children, but only few studies have been conducted among groups with low socio-economic status. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate the effectiveness of a parental support programme to promote healthy dietary and physical activity habits and to prevent overweight and obesity in six-year-old children in disadvantaged areas.
A cluster-randomised controlled trial was carried out in disadvantaged areas in Stockholm. Participants were six-year-old children (n?=?378) and their parents. Thirty-one school classes from 13 schools were randomly assigned to intervention (n?=?16) and control groups (n?=?15). The intervention lasted for 6 months and included: 1) Health information for parents, 2) Motivational Interviewing with parents and 3) Teacher-led classroom activities with children. Physical activity was measured by accelerometry, dietary intake and screen time with a questionnaire, body weight and height were measured and BMI standard deviation score was calculated. Measurements were conducted at baseline, post-intervention and at 5months follow-up. Group effects were examined using Mixed-effect Regression analyses adjusted for sex, parental education and baseline values.
Fidelity to all three intervention components was satisfactory. Significant intervention effects were found regarding consumption of unhealthy foods (p?=?0.01) and unhealthy drinks (p?=?0.01). At follow-up, the effect on intake of unhealthy foods was sustained for boys (p?=?0.03). There was no intervention effect on physical activity. Further, the intervention had no apparent effect on BMI sds for the whole sample, but a significant difference between groups was detected among children who were obese at baseline (p?=?0.03) which was not sustained at follow-up.
The Healthy School Start study shows that it is possible to influence intake of unhealthy foods and drinks and weight development in obese children by providing individual parental support in a school context. However, the effects were short-lived. Therefore, the programme needs to be prolonged and/or intensified in order to obtain stronger and sustainable effects. This study is an important contribution to the further development of evidence-based parental support programmes to prevent overweight and obesity in children in disadvantaged areas.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26795378 View in PubMed
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Effects of an antenatal lifestyle intervention on offspring obesity - a 5-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285208
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2017 Sep;96(9):1093-1099
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
Ann-Kristin Ronnberg
Ulf Hanson
Kerstin Nilsson
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2017 Sep;96(9):1093-1099
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Composition
Child, Preschool
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Life Style
Obesity, Morbid - prevention & control
Pediatric Obesity - prevention & control
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - prevention & control
Sweden
Weight Gain
Abstract
Strategies to limit excessive maternal gestational weight gain could also have positive health effects for the offspring. This study informs us on the effect of an antenatal lifestyle intervention on offspring body mass index (BMI) trajectory until age five.
A secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial aimed at reducing gestational weight gain, set in Ørebro, Sweden (Clinical Trials.gov Id NCT00451425). Offspring were followed with standardized measures of weight and height until age five. Mean BMI z-score and proportion (%) of over- and undernutrition (BMI z-score > ± 2 standard deviations) was compared between groups. Risk estimates for obesity at age five were analyzed in relation to maternal gestational weight gain and prepregnancy BMI as a secondary outcome.
We analyzed 374 children at birth and 300 at age five. No significant difference in mean BMI z-score was seen at birth (0.68 (I) vs 0.56 (C), p = 0.242) or at age five (0.34 (I) vs 0.26 (C), p = 0.510) and no significant difference in proportion of over- or undernutrition was seen. Excessive maternal gestational weight gain was an independent risk factor for offspring obesity at birth (OR = 4.51, p
PubMed ID
28498482 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of an eHealth intervention aiming to promote healthy food habits from infancy -the Norwegian randomized controlled trial Early Food for Future Health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302026
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2019 01 03; 16(1):1
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-03-2019
Author
Christine Helle
Elisabet R Hillesund
Andrew K Wills
Nina C Øverby
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Sport and Nutrition, Faculty of Health and Sport Sciences, University of Agder, PO Box 422, 4604, Kristiansand, Norway. christine.helle@uia.no.
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2019 01 03; 16(1):1
Date
01-03-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Anthropometry
Cookbooks as Topic
Counseling
Diet
Eating
Feeding Behavior
Female
Fruit
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Infant
Infant Behavior
Male
Meals
Mothers
Norway
Parents
Pediatric Obesity - prevention & control
Surveys and Questionnaires
Telemedicine
Vegetables
Abstract
Strategies to optimize early-life nutrition provide an important opportunity for primary prevention of childhood obesity. Interventions that can be efficiently scaled-up to the magnitude needed for sustainable childhood obesity prevention are needed. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of an eHealth intervention on parental feeding practices and infant eating behaviors.
The Norwegian study Early Food for Future Health is a randomized controlled trial. Parents were recruited via social media and child health clinics during spring 2016 when their child was aged 3 to 5?months. In total 718 parents completed a web-based baseline questionnaire at child age 5.5?months. The intervention group had access to a webpage with monthly short video clips addressing specific infant feeding topics and age-appropriate baby food recipes from child age 6 to 12?months. The control group received routine care. The primary outcomes were child eating behaviors, dietary intake, mealtime routines and maternal feeding practices and feeding styles. The secondary outcomes were child anthropometry. This paper reports outcomes at child age 12?months.
More than 80% of the intervention group reported viewing all/most of the video clips addressing infant feeding topics and indicated that the films were well adapted to the child's age and easy to understand. Children in the intervention group were served vegetables/fruits more frequently (p?=?0.035) and had tasted a wider variety of vegetables (p?=?0.015) compared to controls. They were also more likely to eat family breakfast (p?=?0.035) and dinner (p?=?0.011) and less likely to be playing or watching TV/tablet during meals (p?=?0.009) compared to control-group children. We found no group differences for child anthropometry or maternal feeding practices.
Our findings suggest that the eHealth intervention is an appropriate and feasible tool to propagate information on healthy infant feeding to Norwegian mothers. Our study also suggests that anticipatory guidance on early protective feeding practices by such a tool may increase young children's daily vegetable/fruit intake and promote beneficial mealtime routines.
ISRCTN, ISRCTN13601567. Registered 29 February 2016, http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN13601567.
PubMed ID
30606197 View in PubMed
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