Skip header and navigation

Refine By

69 records – page 1 of 7.

An adaptation of the Miller patient classification system for the postanesthesia care unit at Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228606
Source
J Post Anesth Nurs. 1990 Aug;5(4):239-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1990
Author
J. Kay
D. Alcock
J. Lawrence
M. Goodman
Source
J Post Anesth Nurs. 1990 Aug;5(4):239-46
Date
Aug-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Nursing Care
Ontario
Patients - classification
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling
Recovery Room - manpower
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
Using the Miller Patient Classification framework, a descriptive three-phase study was carried out in order to develop a classification system specifically for the PACU of the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario. This study contributes further understanding of the complexities of developing a reliable classification system for the pediatric PACU.
PubMed ID
2388168 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1995 Feb;21(2):415
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1995
Author
C A Armstrong-Esther
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1995 Feb;21(2):415
Date
Feb-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Health Care Reform - trends
Humans
Long-Term Care - trends
Patients - classification
Rehabilitation - trends
Notes
Comment On: J Adv Nurs. 1994 Dec;20(6):1182-57860866
PubMed ID
7714302 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Another example of nurses' contribution to developments].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235170
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1987 May 20;87(21):3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-1987

[A proposal for the classification of nursing situations in extramural care. A Nursing Dependency Scale].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237728
Source
Vard Nord Utveckl Forsk. 1986;6(2):355-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986

[Assessment of patients' health status--review of the literature and assessment methods].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203354
Source
Nord Med. 1998 Dec;113(10):360-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
S. Andreassen
L. Edgren
Author Affiliation
Sykehuset Ostfold, Fredrikstad.
Source
Nord Med. 1998 Dec;113(10):360-2
Date
Dec-1998
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health status
Health Status Indicators
Health Surveys
Humans
Methods
Norway
Patients - classification
Abstract
The question often arises of how health status is to be measured, or to what end. A number of instruments have been developed for the measurement of patient health, and the article consists in a review of the methodology and specific applications of some of those most commonly used, as outlined in published reports. The review showed the defined goal (s) of investigation to constitute a crucial determinant of the choice of methods, as most of the available instruments are designed for specific situations or categories of patients. Thus, an unfortunate choice may result in sufficient or erroneous data for the purposes of decision making.
PubMed ID
9894416 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Association between productivity, list size, patient and practice characteristics in general practice]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97195
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2010 Apr 19;172(16):1192-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-19-2010
Author
Kim Rose Olsen
Torben Højmark Sørensen
Dorte Gyrd-Hansen
Author Affiliation
Dansk Sundhedsinstitut, Forskningsenheden for Sundhedsøkonomi, Institut for Sundhedstjenesteforskning, Syddansk Universitet, Dampfaergevej 27-29, DK-2100 København Ø, Denmark. kro@dsi.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2010 Apr 19;172(16):1192-6
Date
Apr-19-2010
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Denmark
Efficiency, Organizational
Family Practice - manpower - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Group Practice
Humans
Patients - classification - statistics & numerical data
Physician's Practice Patterns
Private Practice
Registries
Socioeconomic Factors
Waiting Lists
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Due to shortage of general practitioners, it may be necessary to improve productivity. We assess the association between productivity, list size and patient- and practice characteristics. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A regression approach is used to perform productivity analysis based on national register data and survey data for 1,758 practices. Practices are divided into four groups according to list size and productivity. Statistical tests are used to assess differences in patient- and practice characteristics. RESULTS: There is a significant, positive correlation between list size and productivity (p
PubMed ID
20423660 View in PubMed
Less detail

Characteristics of non-urgent patients. Cross-sectional study of emergency department and primary care patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92814
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2008;26(3):181-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Backman Ann-Sofie
Blomqvist Paul
Lagerlund Magdalena
Carlsson-Holm Eva
Adami Johanna
Author Affiliation
Department of Emergency Medicine, Stockholm Söder Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. Ann-Sofie.Backman@ki.se
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2008;26(3):181-7
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Community Health Centers - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Emergency Medical Services - utilization
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Family Practice
Female
Health Services Misuse
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Patients - classification - psychology
Primary Health Care - utilization
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Triage
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe characteristics of patients seeking medical attention for non-urgent conditions at an emergency department (ED) and patients who use non-scheduled services in primary healthcare. DESIGN: Descriptive cross-sectional study. SETTING: Primary healthcare centres and an ED with the same catchment area in Stockholm, Sweden. PATIENTS: Non-scheduled primary care patients and non-referred non-urgent ED patients within a defined catchment area investigated by structured face-to-face interviews in office hours during a nine-week period. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Sociodemographic characteristics, chief complaints, previous healthcare use, perception of symptoms, and duration of symptoms before seeking care. RESULTS: Of 924 eligible patients, 736 (80%) agreed to participate, 194 at the ED and 542 at nine corresponding primary care centres. The two groups shared demographic characteristics except gender. A majority (47%) of the patients at the primary care centres had respiratory symptoms, whereas most ED patients (52%) had digestive, musculoskeletal, or traumatic symptoms. Compared with primary care patients, a higher proportion (35%) of the ED patients had been hospitalized previously. ED patients were also more anxious about and disturbed by their symptoms and had had a shorter duration of symptoms. Both groups had previously used healthcare frequently. CONCLUSIONS: Symptoms, previous hospitalization and current perception of symptoms seemed to be the main factors discriminating between patients studied at the different sites. There were no substantial sociodemographic differences between the primary care centre patients and the ED patients.
PubMed ID
18609257 View in PubMed
Less detail

69 records – page 1 of 7.