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164 records – page 1 of 17.

Advancing the Big Five of user-oriented care and accounting for its variations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280692
Source
Int J Health Care Qual Assur. 2016;29(2):162-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Petri Kajonius
Ali Kazemi
Source
Int J Health Care Qual Assur. 2016;29(2):162-76
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Classification
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Models, organizational
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient-Centered Care - organization & administration
Precision Medicine
Quality of Health Care
Risk assessment
Sweden
Abstract
Care process quality (i.e. how care is enacted by a care worker toward a client at the interpersonal level) is a strong predictor of satisfaction in a wide range of health care services. The purpose of this paper is to describe the basic elements of care process quality as user-oriented care. Specifically, the questions of how and why quality in user-oriented care varies were investigated in the context of elderly care.
Two municipalities were selected for in-depth field studies. First, in each municipality, the authors interviewed and observed care workers' interactions with the older persons in both home care and nursing homes during two weeks (Study 1). Second, in an attempt to gain a deeper understanding of why process quality in terms of user-oriented care varies, the authors conducted interviews with care workers and care unit managers (Study 2).
A new taxonomy for categorizing process quality variation, the Big Five of user-oriented care (task-focus, person-focus, affect, cooperation, and time-use), is proposed. In addition, the perceived reasons for process quality variation are reported in our own developed Quality Agents Model, suggesting that variations in care process evaluations may be explained from different perspectives at multiple levels (i.e., older person, care worker-, unit-, department-, and municipality level).
The proposed taxonomy and model are useful for describing user-oriented care quality and the reasons for its variations. These findings are of relevance for future quality developments of elderly care services, but also may be adapted to applications in any other enterprise employing a user-oriented approach.
PubMed ID
26959896 View in PubMed
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The aesthetic dimension in hospitals--an investigation into strategic plans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81540
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2006 Sep;43(7):851-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Caspari Synnøve
Eriksson Katie
Nåden Dagfinn
Author Affiliation
Oslo University College, Faculty of Nursing, Oslo, Norway. Synnove.Caspari@su.hio.no
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2006 Sep;43(7):851-9
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Art
Environment Design - standards
Esthetics
Food Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Guidelines
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Hospital Design and Construction - standards
Hospitals, General - organization & administration
Humans
Interior Design and Furnishings - standards
Noise - prevention & control
Norway
Patient-Centered Care - organization & administration
Patients' Rooms - organization & administration
Philosophy, Medical
Plants
Questionnaires
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND RATIONALE: The underlying assumption was that the aesthetics of the hospital surroundings are often neglected. AIMS: This article is the first part of a larger study into the aesthetics of general hospitals. The aim of the study is to throw light on the influence of aesthetics on the health and well-being of patients and the professional personnel, and to examine how aesthetic considerations are dealt with. We present a survey of how the aesthetic dimension is planned and it is considered important in the strategic plans of Norwegian general hospitals. METHODS: Data were sampled by analyzing the strategic plans of somatic hospitals. Sixty-four of 86 hospitals responded (74%). Concepts were categorized in a matrix of 11 main categories, each with subcategories. The method was quantitative, in that the analyzed material was amenable to counting. RESULTS: Very few concrete guidelines or directions for the aesthetic dimension have been included in written documents. This indicates that the aesthetic area is a neglected field in the directions for the daily management of hospitals. CONCLUSIONS: The research available today on the contribution of environmental aesthetics to health, rehabilitation, and well-being suggests that it is important to have concrete guidelines recorded in strategic plans. This field concerns the maintenance of high quality in the caring professions.
PubMed ID
16824528 View in PubMed
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[Agn├Ęs Gaudreault. An integrated network in which the nurse is the first person to greet the patient].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122475
Source
Perspect Infirm. 2012 Jul-Aug;9(4):20
Publication Type
Article

[Analysis and management of comorbidity among the elderly must be coordinated. Treatment can be evaluated with the DBU method implemented at community centers for the aged].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175189
Source
Lakartidningen. 2005 Mar 7-13;102(10):758-9, 762-3, 765
Publication Type
Article

An assessment of the introduction of a multi-skilled worker into an acute care setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209055
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 1996;9(3):43-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
B. Trerise
L. Lemieux-Charles
Author Affiliation
St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia.
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 1996;9(3):43-8
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Making, Organizational
Food Service, Hospital
Hospital Restructuring - manpower
Housekeeping, Hospital
Humans
Job Description
Ontario
Organizational Culture
Organizational Objectives
Patient-Centered Care - organization & administration
Personnel, Hospital - classification - standards
Psychology, Industrial
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Abstract
The first reengineering project undertaken by the Sunnybrook Health Science Centre after adopting a philosophy of patient-focused care was the introduction of a new category of worker: the multi-skilled service assistant. This article describes the experiences of the first two cohorts of service assistants and assesses the changes made to the work itself and the integration of the new workers into the work environment. It concludes by sharing recommendations for introducing a new work role.
PubMed ID
10162424 View in PubMed
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An Elder-Friendly Hospital: translating a dream into reality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177768
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2004 Mar;17(1):62-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Belinda Parke
Penny Brand
Author Affiliation
Older Adult Health, Chilliwack Health Services, Chilliwack, BC. bparke@shaw.ca
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2004 Mar;17(1):62-76
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
British Columbia
Geriatric Assessment
Health Facility Environment
Health Services for the Aged - organization & administration
Hospital Administration - standards
Humans
Mass Screening
Needs Assessment
Organizational Culture
Organizational Innovation
Organizational Objectives
Organizational Policy
Patient care team
Patient-Centered Care - organization & administration
Philosophy, Medical
Program Development
Risk assessment
Abstract
The complex health profile of an older adult entering a hospital presents staff and administrators with a new challenge. This paper documents the Vancouver Island Health Authority's (VIHA) move towards an Elder-Friendly Hospital (EFH). A new approach to hospital care is described, one that takes account not only of an acute healthcare crisis, but also the developmental phenomena associated with aging, with the likelihood of chronic illnesses compounding both diagnosis and treatment. Customized strategies and suggestions for implementation that may be useful to other healthcare agencies are explained.
Notes
Comment In: Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2004 Mar;17(1):76-715503918
PubMed ID
15503917 View in PubMed
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An examination of the self-care concept uncovers a new direction for healthcare reform.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181374
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2003;16(4):48-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Dianne McCormack
Author Affiliation
University of New Brunswick, Saint John.
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2003;16(4):48-62
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Forecasting
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Health Policy - trends
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Leadership
Models, Nursing
National health programs - organization & administration
Nurse's Role
Nursing - organization & administration
Nursing Theory
Organizational Objectives
Patient-Centered Care - organization & administration
Philosophy, Nursing
Public Policy
Self Care - trends
Abstract
The concept of self-care is multidimensional, with many defining elements. This paper describes the origin of this comprehensive concept. It examines the response of the nursing discipline to citizen self-care initiatives and the subsequent effects this response has had on the development of nursing knowledge. The evolution of self-care as a core concept within Canadian health policy is presented; the potential readiness fo citizens to accept self-care as an aspect of healthcare delivery is explored, identifying potential benefits and obstacles. The paper concludes with a proposed self-care approach to healthcare reform in Canada and the subsequent influence this approach may have on the discipline of nursing. The congruency between a self-care healthcare delivery system and the theoretical foundations and perspective of healthcare delivery held by the nursing discipline is discussed. The role nurses might assume in shaping a self-care healthcare delivery system is delineated.
PubMed ID
14983922 View in PubMed
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An exploration of the patient navigator role: perspectives of younger women with breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105501
Source
Oncol Nurs Forum. 2014 Jan 1;41(1):77-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2014
Author
Allison E Pedersen
Thomas F Hack
Susan E McClement
Jill Taylor-Brown
Author Affiliation
Winnipeg Regional Health Authority Palliative Care Program.
Source
Oncol Nurs Forum. 2014 Jan 1;41(1):77-88
Date
Jan-1-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Age Factors
Anxiety - etiology
Breast Neoplasms - nursing - psychology
Female
Humans
Interview, Psychological
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Oncology Nursing
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Patient Education as Topic
Patient Navigation
Patient Participation
Patient-Centered Care - organization & administration
Professional-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Role
Social Support
Social Work
Uncertainty
Young Adult
Abstract
To delineate the role of the oncology patient navigator, drawing from the experiences and descriptions of younger women with breast cancer.
Interpretive, descriptive, qualitative research design.
Participants' homes, researcher's home, and via telephone, all in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
12 women aged 50 years or younger who were diagnosed with breast cancer within the last three years.
Face-to-face semistructured interviews explored patient experiences with the cancer care system, including problems encountered, unmet needs, and opinions about the functions of the patient navigator role. The audio-recorded interviews were transcribed and data were broken down and inductively coded into four categories. Constant comparative techniques also were used during analysis.
The role of the oncology patient navigator included two facets: "Processual facets," with the subthemes assigned to me at diagnosis, managing the connection, mapping the process, practical support, and quarterbacking my entire journey; and "Personal qualities: The essentials," with the subthemes empathetic care tenor, knowing the cancer system, and understanding the medical side of breast cancer.
Despite the tremendous effort directed toward enhancing care for younger women undergoing treatment for breast cancer, gaps continue to exist. Younger women with breast cancer require a care approach providing ongoing dialogue, teaching, and emotional support from the point of diagnosis through treatment, including transitions of care within the oncology setting and back to their primary care practitioner.
Oncology nurse navigators are well positioned to provide patients with anticipatory guidance from diagnosis to the end of treatment.
Notes
Comment In: Oncol Nurs Forum. 2014 Jan 1;41(1):89-9124368242
PubMed ID
24368241 View in PubMed
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An interprofessional practice capability framework focusing on safe, high-quality, client-centred health service.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113221
Source
J Allied Health. 2013;42(2):e45-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Margo L Brewer
Sue Jones
Author Affiliation
Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia. m.brewer@curtin.edu.au
Source
J Allied Health. 2013;42(2):e45-9
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allied Health Personnel - education
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Curriculum
Great Britain
Humans
Models, Educational
Patient Safety
Patient-Centered Care - organization & administration
Professional Competence
Quality of Health Care
United States
Abstract
This paper describes an interprofessional capability framework which builds on the existing interprofessional competency and capability frameworks from the United Kingdom, Canada, and the United States of America. Existing published frameworks generally make reference to being client-centred and to the safety and quality of care, and locate interprofessional collaborative practice as the central theme or objective. In contrast, this framework interlinks all three elements: client-centred services, safety and quality of services, and interprofessional collaborative practice. The framework is clear and succinct with an accompanying visual representation that highlights all key features. The framework has informed curriculum which incorporates a common first-year, case-based educational workshops and practice placements within a large complex health sciences faculty of approximately 10,000 students from 22 disciplines. The articulation of these key elements of health practice has facilitated students, academic staff, and community health professionals to develop a shared understanding of interprofessional education and practice. The design, implementation, and evaluation of learning outcomes, learning experiences, and assessments have been transformed with the introduction of this framework, which is highly applicable to other contexts.
PubMed ID
23752243 View in PubMed
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164 records – page 1 of 17.