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The 6 dimensions of promising practice for case managed supports to end homelessness: part 2: the 6 dimensions of quality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129049
Source
Prof Case Manag. 2012 Jan-Feb;17(1):4-12; quiz 13-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Katrina Milaney
Author Affiliation
Calgary Homeless Foundation, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. kmilaney@calgaryhomeless.com
Source
Prof Case Manag. 2012 Jan-Feb;17(1):4-12; quiz 13-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Case Management - standards - statistics & numerical data
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration - standards
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Homeless Persons - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Patient care team
Patient-Centered Care - methods
Physician's Practice Patterns - standards - statistics & numerical data
Professional Competence
Quality of Health Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Homelessness is a social condition increasing in frequency and severity across Canada. Interventions to end and prevent homelessness include effective case management in addition to an affordable housing provision. Little standardization exists for service providers to guide their decision making in developing and maintaining effective case management programs. The purpose of this 2-part article is to articulate dimensions of promising practice for case managers working in a "Housing First" context. Part 1 discusses research processes and findings and Part 2 articulates the 6 dimensions of quality.
Practice settings include community-based organizations that employ and support case managers whose primary role is moving people from homelessness into permanent supportive housing.
Six dimensions of promising practice are critically important to reducing barriers, improving sector collaboration, and ensuring that case managers have appropriate and effective training and support. Dimensions of promising practice are (1) collaboration and cooperation-a true team approach; (2) right matching of services-person-centered; (3) contextual case management-culture and flexibility; (4) the right kind of engagement-relationships and advocacy; (5) coordinated and well-managed system-ethics and communication; and (6) evaluation for success-support and training.
Effective, coordinated case management, in addition to permanent affordable housing has the potential to reduce a person's or family's homelessness permanently. Organizations and professionals working in this context have the opportunity to improve processes, reduce burnout, collaborate and standardize, and, most importantly, efficiently and permanently end someone's homelessness with the help of dimensions of quality for case management.
PubMed ID
22146635 View in PubMed
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Source
Cancer Nurs. 2013 Nov-Dec;36(6)
Publication Type
Article
Source
Cancer Nurs. 2013 Nov-Dec;36(6)
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Awards and Prizes
Clinical Nursing Research
History, 21st Century
Humans
Internet
Leadership
Male
Norway
Oncology Nursing - methods
Patient-Centered Care - methods
Quality of Life
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Social Support
United States
Abstract
The winner of the "Best Original Research Paper in Cancer Nursing" Award for 2013 is "Effects of an Internet Support System to Assist Cancer Patients in Reducing Symptom Distress: A Randomized Controlled Trial" by Cornelia M. Ruland, PhD.
PubMed ID
24149985 View in PubMed
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The Alumni program: redefining continuity of care in psychiatry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203317
Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 1999 Jan;37(1):23-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
H. Hobbs
J H Wilson
S. Archie
Author Affiliation
McMaster University Medical Centre, Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 1999 Jan;37(1):23-9
Date
Jan-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aftercare - methods - organization & administration
Case Management - organization & administration
Chronic Disease
Continuity of Patient Care
Humans
Long-Term Care - methods - organization & administration
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Ontario
Patient care team
Patient Participation
Patient-Centered Care - methods
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Psychiatry - organization & administration
Psychotic Disorders - rehabilitation
Self Care - methods
Sick Role
Abstract
The Alumni Program is a novel approach to the continuing care and preventive treatment of clients with "chronic" mental illness. This approach demands a different conceptualization of outpatient psychiatric intervention. The infectious disease model has been deliberately replaced with a chronic illness model that more accurately reflects the course and natural history of psychiatric illness. The Alumni Program is similar to the approach employed with other chronic medical conditions like arthritis, asthma, or diabetes. The program has complementary roles for both specialty psychiatric clinicians and family practitioners. In addition, the program empowers clients and their families to play a key role in their own ongoing adaptation and adjustment to chronic illness while striving for optimal wellness.
PubMed ID
9921462 View in PubMed
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Canadian dietitians' understanding of the client-centered approach to nutrition counseling.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162234
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Aug;107(8):1414-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Debbie MacLellan
Shawna Berenbaum
Author Affiliation
Department of Family and Nutritional Sciences, University of Prince Edward Island, 550 University Ave, Charlottetown, PE C1A 4P3, Canada. maclellan@upei.ca
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Aug;107(8):1414-7
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Clinical Competence
Communication
Counseling - methods
Data Collection
Diet
Dietetics - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Nutritional Sciences - education
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Patient-Centered Care - methods
Abstract
Many dietetic researchers have recommended the use of a client-centered approach to counseling, but little has been written about what that means from the perspective of the practicing dietitian. The purpose of this study was to explore dietitians' understanding of the client-centered approach to nutrition counseling. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 25 Canadian dietitians from a variety of practice areas. Interview transcripts were analyzed using a form of inductive, thematic analysis. Results suggest that although participants believe that practicing in a client-centered manner is important, they were struggling in their attempt to balance their practice values and beliefs with the realities of their work environments. Meeting clients' needs and wants was seen as critical to the client-centered approach, but there was some indecision around who determines these needs and what the difference is between needs and wants. Recognizing the expertise that clients can bring to the counseling relationship was also an issue for participants. Additional research to explore the way that dietitians learn how to counsel can lead to a better understanding of how to develop effective therapeutic relationships with our clients within the confines of current workplace environments.
PubMed ID
17659911 View in PubMed
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The Cardiac Self-Efficacy Scale, a useful tool with potential to evaluate person-centred care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275841
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2015 Dec;14(6):536-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2015
Author
Andreas Fors
Kerstin Ulin
Christina Cliffordson
Inger Ekman
Eva Brink
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2015 Dec;14(6):536-43
Date
Dec-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient-Centered Care - methods - statistics & numerical data
Person-Centered Therapy - methods
Prognosis
Psychometrics
Self Efficacy
Severity of Illness Index
Survivors
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Cardiac self-efficacy is a person's belief in his/her ability to manage the challenges posed by a coronary disease, and its role has been evaluated in several coronary populations using the Cardiac Self-Efficacy Scale (CSE Scale). Self-efficacy has an important role in person-centred care, however there is a lack of appropriate instruments that evaluate person-centred interventions.
The purpose of this study was to validate the CSE Scale by examining its psychometric properties as a first step in evaluating a person-centred care intervention in persons with acute coronary syndrome (ACS).
The study sample consisted of 288 persons (72 women, 216 men) who completed the Swedish version of the CSE Scale two months after hospitalisation for an ACS event. Construct validity was psychometrically evaluated using confirmatory factor analysis. Additionally, convergent and discriminant validity were tested using correlation analyses.
The results revealed that the CSE Scale was represented by three dimensions (control symptoms, control illness and maintain functioning). The analyses also showed that the CSE Scale is suitable for providing a total summary score that represents a global cardiac self-efficacy dimension. Evaluation of convergent and discriminant validity showed the expected correlations.
The CSE Scale is a valid and reliable measure when evaluating self-efficacy in patients with ACS. It also seems to be a useful tool to promote person-centred care in clinical practice since it may offer useful guidance in the dialogue with the patient in the common creation of a personal health plan.
PubMed ID
25149667 View in PubMed
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Client-centered design of residential addiction and mental health care facilities: staff perceptions of their work environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133240
Source
Qual Health Res. 2011 Nov;21(11):1527-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Gabriela Novotná
Karen A Urbanoski
Brian R Rush
Author Affiliation
McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. novotng@mcmaster.ca
Source
Qual Health Res. 2011 Nov;21(11):1527-38
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Environment Design
Focus Groups
Health Facility Planning
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Mental health
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Ontario
Patient-Centered Care - methods - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Residential Facilities - manpower - methods - organization & administration
Social Environment
Social Perception
Substance-Related Disorders - drug therapy - psychology - therapy
Workplace - psychology
Abstract
In this article we discuss the findings from a series of focus groups conducted as part of a 3-year, mixed-method evaluation of clinical programs in a large mental health and substance use treatment facility in Canada. We examined the perceptions of clinical personnel on the physical design of new treatment units and the impact on service delivery and the work environment. The new physical design appeared to support client recovery and reduce stigma; however, it brought certain challenges. Participants reported a compromised ability to monitor clients, a lack of designated therapeutic spaces, and insufficient workspace for staff. They also thought that physical design positively facilitated communication and therapeutic relationships among clinicians and clients, and increased team cohesion. We suggest that, from these findings, new avenues for research on achieving the important balance between client and staff needs in health facility design can be explored.
PubMed ID
21725027 View in PubMed
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Clinicians' perceived usefulness of a support system for patient-centered cancer care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79796
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2006;124:624-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Ruland Cornelia M
Author Affiliation
Center for Shared Decision Making & Nursing Research, Rikshospitalet-Radiumhospitalet Medical Center, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2006;124:624-30
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Nurses - psychology
Patient-Centered Care - methods
Physicians - psychology
Point-of-Care Systems
Questionnaires
Abstract
We investigated the perceived usefulness by 65 nurses and 12 physicians who had used CHOICE, a support system designed to improve patient-centred symptom management for cancer patients at the point of care. Two questionnaires addressed the following aspects: clinicians' usage patterns; ease of use; system ability to improve care planning, understanding of patients' perspectives, and patient-provider communication; attitudes towards patients' involvement in decision making about patient care; and perceived usefulness, defined as a system's ability to enhance work performance. The overall survey response rate was 78%. Clinicians reported that they had used information outputs provided by the CHOICE system on average 50% of the time, but nurses used them significantly more than physicians. The system received high ratings on all aspects of usefulness by both groups, but again, nurses provided consistently higher usefulness ratings than physicians did. There was a strong, significant correlation between patterns of use and perceived usefulness. There were no correlations between perceived usefulness and respondents' age, gender and clinical experience. Results confirm that the CHOICE system can successfully assist nurses and physicians to improve patient care for cancer patients in ongoing practice.
PubMed ID
17108586 View in PubMed
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Conveying compassion through attention to the essential ordinary.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149338
Source
Nurs Older People. 2009 Jul;21(6):14-21; quiz 22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Beth Perry
Author Affiliation
Center for Nursing and Health Studies, Athabasca University, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Nurs Older People. 2009 Jul;21(6):14-21; quiz 22
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attention
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Communication
Empathy
Geriatric Nursing - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Long-Term Care - methods - psychology
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Homes
Nursing Methodology Research
Patient Advocacy
Patient-Centered Care - methods
Qualitative Research
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Stress, Psychological - nursing - psychology
Abstract
To discover some of the means by which nurses let older people know that they sense their suffering and are willing to try to relieve or at least reduce it.
A purposive sample of seven nurses employed in long-term care in Canada was recruited by network sampling. Data from unstructured interviews and participant observations were analysed and themes identified.
The overarching theme identified was attention to the essential ordinary, with two sub-themes being 'attention to the little things' and 'keeping the promise to never abandon'.
Paying attention to the little things, and the resulting patient-centred approach that this care provided, seemed to send a message to patients that they had value. When nurses were able to enhance the esteem needs of patients in this way they also found meaning in their work and a sense of professional fulfilment.
PubMed ID
19650538 View in PubMed
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Creating relationships with persons with moderate to severe dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105688
Source
Dementia (London). 2013 Jan;12(1):63-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Iréne Ericsson
Sofia Kjellström
Ingrid Hellström
Author Affiliation
Jönköping University, Sweden.
Source
Dementia (London). 2013 Jan;12(1):63-79
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Caregivers - psychology
Cost of Illness
Dementia - psychology
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Interview, Psychological
Male
Models, Psychological
Patient-Centered Care - methods
Sweden
Trust
Abstract
The study describes how relationships are created with persons with moderate to severe dementia. The material comprises 24 video sequences of Relational Time (RT) sessions, 24 interviews with persons with dementia and eight interviews with professional caregivers. The study method was Constructivist Grounded Theory. The categories of 'Assigning time', 'Establishing security and trust' and 'Communicating equality' were strategies for arriving at the core category, 'Opening up', which was the process that led to creating relationships. Both parties had to contribute to create a relationship; the professional caregiver controlled the process, but the person with dementia permitted the caregiver's overtures and opened up, thus making the relationship possible. Interpersonal relationships are significant to enhancing the well-being of persons with dementia. Small measures like RT that do not require major resources can open paths to creating relationships.
PubMed ID
24336663 View in PubMed
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Critical care nurses management of prolonged weaning: an interview study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274882
Source
Nurs Crit Care. 2014 Sep;19(5):236-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Carl-Johan Cederwall
Kaety Plos
Louise Rose
Amanda Dübeck
Mona Ringdal
Source
Nurs Crit Care. 2014 Sep;19(5):236-42
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cooperative Behavior
Critical Care Nursing - methods
Decision Making
Female
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse's Role
Nursing, Team - methods
Patient-Centered Care - methods
Respiration, Artificial - nursing
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Time Factors
Ventilator Weaning - nursing
Abstract
For most critically ill patients requiring mechanical ventilation in the intensive care unit (ICU) weaning is uncomplicated. For the remainder, weaning is a challenge and may result in further complications and increased risk of mortality. Critical care nurses (CCNs) require substantial knowledge and experience to manage patients experiencing prolonged weaning.
The aim of this study was to explore CCNs approach for management of patients experiencing prolonged weaning in the ICU.
A descriptive qualitative design.
Semi-structured interviews with 19 experienced CCNs were conducted. Data were analysed using content analysis.
Participants used various strategies for weaning that were grouped into four categories: individualized planning for the weaning process, assessing patient's capacity, managing the process and team interaction. The overall theme that emerged was: CCNs drive the weaning process using both a patient centred and targeted approach.
CCNs in these ICUs performed weaning using a patient centred approach to plan, initiate, assess and establish a holistic weaning process. Team collaboration among all health care practitioners was important. CCNs have a key role in prioritizing weaning and driving the process forward.
Closeness to the patient and a key role in management of the mechanical ventilated patient in ICU gives the CCN unique potential to develop and create models and tools for prolonged weaning. These tools, specially designed for patients undergoing prolonged weaning, would give focus on continuous planning, collaborating, managing and evaluation in the process of liberating patients from mechanical ventilation.
PubMed ID
24809683 View in PubMed
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66 records – page 1 of 7.