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The 6 dimensions of promising practice for case managed supports to end homelessness: part 2: the 6 dimensions of quality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129049
Source
Prof Case Manag. 2012 Jan-Feb;17(1):4-12; quiz 13-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Katrina Milaney
Author Affiliation
Calgary Homeless Foundation, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. kmilaney@calgaryhomeless.com
Source
Prof Case Manag. 2012 Jan-Feb;17(1):4-12; quiz 13-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Case Management - standards - statistics & numerical data
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration - standards
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Homeless Persons - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Patient care team
Patient-Centered Care - methods
Physician's Practice Patterns - standards - statistics & numerical data
Professional Competence
Quality of Health Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Homelessness is a social condition increasing in frequency and severity across Canada. Interventions to end and prevent homelessness include effective case management in addition to an affordable housing provision. Little standardization exists for service providers to guide their decision making in developing and maintaining effective case management programs. The purpose of this 2-part article is to articulate dimensions of promising practice for case managers working in a "Housing First" context. Part 1 discusses research processes and findings and Part 2 articulates the 6 dimensions of quality.
Practice settings include community-based organizations that employ and support case managers whose primary role is moving people from homelessness into permanent supportive housing.
Six dimensions of promising practice are critically important to reducing barriers, improving sector collaboration, and ensuring that case managers have appropriate and effective training and support. Dimensions of promising practice are (1) collaboration and cooperation-a true team approach; (2) right matching of services-person-centered; (3) contextual case management-culture and flexibility; (4) the right kind of engagement-relationships and advocacy; (5) coordinated and well-managed system-ethics and communication; and (6) evaluation for success-support and training.
Effective, coordinated case management, in addition to permanent affordable housing has the potential to reduce a person's or family's homelessness permanently. Organizations and professionals working in this context have the opportunity to improve processes, reduce burnout, collaborate and standardize, and, most importantly, efficiently and permanently end someone's homelessness with the help of dimensions of quality for case management.
PubMed ID
22146635 View in PubMed
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Source
Cancer Nurs. 2013 Nov-Dec;36(6)
Publication Type
Article
Source
Cancer Nurs. 2013 Nov-Dec;36(6)
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Awards and Prizes
Clinical Nursing Research
History, 21st Century
Humans
Internet
Leadership
Male
Norway
Oncology Nursing - methods
Patient-Centered Care - methods
Quality of Life
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Social Support
United States
Abstract
The winner of the "Best Original Research Paper in Cancer Nursing" Award for 2013 is "Effects of an Internet Support System to Assist Cancer Patients in Reducing Symptom Distress: A Randomized Controlled Trial" by Cornelia M. Ruland, PhD.
PubMed ID
24149985 View in PubMed
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Academic administrators' attitudes towards interprofessional education in Canadian schools of health professional education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173370
Source
J Interprof Care. 2005 May;19 Suppl 1:76-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Vernon R Curran
Diana R Deacon
Lisa Fleet
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Canada. vcurran@mun.ca
Source
J Interprof Care. 2005 May;19 Suppl 1:76-86
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel - psychology
Attitude
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Education, Professional - organization & administration
Health Occupations - education
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Patient care team
Patient-Centered Care
Questionnaires
Schools, Health Occupations
Abstract
Interprofessional education is an approach to educating and training students and practitioners from different health professions to work in a collaborative manner in providing client and/or patient-centred care. The introduction and successful implementation of this educational approach is dependent on a variety of factors, including the attitudes of students, faculty, senior academic administrators (e.g., deans and directors) and practitioners. The purpose of this study was to examine attitudes towards interprofessional teamwork and interprofessional education amongst academic administrators of post-secondary health professional education programs in Canada. A web-based questionnaire in English and French was distributed via e-mail messaging during January 2004 to academic administrators in Canada representing medicine, nursing, pharmacy, social work, occupational therapy and physiotherapy post-secondary educational programs. Responses were sought on attitudes towards interprofessional teamwork and interprofessional education, as well as opinions regarding barriers to interprofessional education and subject areas that lend themselves to interprofessional education. In general, academic administrators responding to the survey hold overall positive attitudes towards interprofessional teamwork and interprofessional education practices, and the results indicate there were no significant differences between professions in relation to these attitudinal perspectives. The main barriers to interprofessional education were problems with scheduling/calendar, rigid curriculum, turf battles and lack of perceived value. The main pre-clinical subject areas which respondents believed would lend themselves to interprofessional education included community health/prevention, ethics, communications, critical appraisal, and epidemiology. The results of this study suggest that a favourable perception of both interprofessional teamwork and interprofessional education exists amongst academic administrators of Canadian health professional education programs. If this is the case, the post-secondary system in Canada is primed for the introduction of interprofessional education initiatives which support the development of client and patient-centred collaborative practice competencies.
PubMed ID
16096147 View in PubMed
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Advancing the Big Five of user-oriented care and accounting for its variations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280692
Source
Int J Health Care Qual Assur. 2016;29(2):162-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Petri Kajonius
Ali Kazemi
Source
Int J Health Care Qual Assur. 2016;29(2):162-76
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Classification
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Models, organizational
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient-Centered Care - organization & administration
Precision Medicine
Quality of Health Care
Risk assessment
Sweden
Abstract
Care process quality (i.e. how care is enacted by a care worker toward a client at the interpersonal level) is a strong predictor of satisfaction in a wide range of health care services. The purpose of this paper is to describe the basic elements of care process quality as user-oriented care. Specifically, the questions of how and why quality in user-oriented care varies were investigated in the context of elderly care.
Two municipalities were selected for in-depth field studies. First, in each municipality, the authors interviewed and observed care workers' interactions with the older persons in both home care and nursing homes during two weeks (Study 1). Second, in an attempt to gain a deeper understanding of why process quality in terms of user-oriented care varies, the authors conducted interviews with care workers and care unit managers (Study 2).
A new taxonomy for categorizing process quality variation, the Big Five of user-oriented care (task-focus, person-focus, affect, cooperation, and time-use), is proposed. In addition, the perceived reasons for process quality variation are reported in our own developed Quality Agents Model, suggesting that variations in care process evaluations may be explained from different perspectives at multiple levels (i.e., older person, care worker-, unit-, department-, and municipality level).
The proposed taxonomy and model are useful for describing user-oriented care quality and the reasons for its variations. These findings are of relevance for future quality developments of elderly care services, but also may be adapted to applications in any other enterprise employing a user-oriented approach.
PubMed ID
26959896 View in PubMed
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The aesthetic dimension in hospitals--an investigation into strategic plans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81540
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2006 Sep;43(7):851-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Caspari Synnøve
Eriksson Katie
Nåden Dagfinn
Author Affiliation
Oslo University College, Faculty of Nursing, Oslo, Norway. Synnove.Caspari@su.hio.no
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2006 Sep;43(7):851-9
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Art
Environment Design - standards
Esthetics
Food Service, Hospital - organization & administration
Guidelines
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research
Hospital Design and Construction - standards
Hospitals, General - organization & administration
Humans
Interior Design and Furnishings - standards
Noise - prevention & control
Norway
Patient-Centered Care - organization & administration
Patients' Rooms - organization & administration
Philosophy, Medical
Plants
Questionnaires
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND RATIONALE: The underlying assumption was that the aesthetics of the hospital surroundings are often neglected. AIMS: This article is the first part of a larger study into the aesthetics of general hospitals. The aim of the study is to throw light on the influence of aesthetics on the health and well-being of patients and the professional personnel, and to examine how aesthetic considerations are dealt with. We present a survey of how the aesthetic dimension is planned and it is considered important in the strategic plans of Norwegian general hospitals. METHODS: Data were sampled by analyzing the strategic plans of somatic hospitals. Sixty-four of 86 hospitals responded (74%). Concepts were categorized in a matrix of 11 main categories, each with subcategories. The method was quantitative, in that the analyzed material was amenable to counting. RESULTS: Very few concrete guidelines or directions for the aesthetic dimension have been included in written documents. This indicates that the aesthetic area is a neglected field in the directions for the daily management of hospitals. CONCLUSIONS: The research available today on the contribution of environmental aesthetics to health, rehabilitation, and well-being suggests that it is important to have concrete guidelines recorded in strategic plans. This field concerns the maintenance of high quality in the caring professions.
PubMed ID
16824528 View in PubMed
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[Agn├Ęs Gaudreault. An integrated network in which the nurse is the first person to greet the patient].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122475
Source
Perspect Infirm. 2012 Jul-Aug;9(4):20
Publication Type
Article

Alberta's systems approach to chronic disease management and prevention utilizing the expanded chronic care model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146163
Source
Healthc Q. 2009;13 Spec No:98-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Sandra Delon
Blair Mackinnon
Author Affiliation
Chronic Disease Prevention & Oral Health, Alberta Health Services.
Source
Healthc Q. 2009;13 Spec No:98-104
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Chronic Disease - prevention & control
Consumer Participation
Continuity of Patient Care - organization & administration
Decision Support Techniques
Disease Management
Evidence-Based Practice
Health Care Reform - organization & administration
Humans
Long-Term Care
Models, organizational
National Health Programs
Organizational Case Studies
Patient Education as Topic
Patient Participation
Patient-Centered Care
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Self Care
Systems Integration
Total Quality Management - organization & administration
Abstract
Alberta's integrated approach to chronic disease management programming embraces client-centred care, supports self-management and facilitates care across the continuum. This paper presents strategies implemented through collaboration with primary care to improve care of individuals with chronic conditions, evaluation evidence supporting success and lessons learned from the Alberta perspective.
PubMed ID
20057258 View in PubMed
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The Alumni program: redefining continuity of care in psychiatry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203317
Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 1999 Jan;37(1):23-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
H. Hobbs
J H Wilson
S. Archie
Author Affiliation
McMaster University Medical Centre, Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 1999 Jan;37(1):23-9
Date
Jan-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aftercare - methods - organization & administration
Case Management - organization & administration
Chronic Disease
Continuity of Patient Care
Humans
Long-Term Care - methods - organization & administration
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Ontario
Patient care team
Patient Participation
Patient-Centered Care - methods
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Psychiatry - organization & administration
Psychotic Disorders - rehabilitation
Self Care - methods
Sick Role
Abstract
The Alumni Program is a novel approach to the continuing care and preventive treatment of clients with "chronic" mental illness. This approach demands a different conceptualization of outpatient psychiatric intervention. The infectious disease model has been deliberately replaced with a chronic illness model that more accurately reflects the course and natural history of psychiatric illness. The Alumni Program is similar to the approach employed with other chronic medical conditions like arthritis, asthma, or diabetes. The program has complementary roles for both specialty psychiatric clinicians and family practitioners. In addition, the program empowers clients and their families to play a key role in their own ongoing adaptation and adjustment to chronic illness while striving for optimal wellness.
PubMed ID
9921462 View in PubMed
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[Analysis and management of comorbidity among the elderly must be coordinated. Treatment can be evaluated with the DBU method implemented at community centers for the aged].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175189
Source
Lakartidningen. 2005 Mar 7-13;102(10):758-9, 762-3, 765
Publication Type
Article

Analysis of the Updated Swedish Regulatory Framework of the Patient Accessible Electronic Health Record in Relation to Usage Experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292465
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2017; 245:798-802
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2017
Author
Isabella Scandurra
Maria Pettersson
Benny Eklund
Leif Lyttkens
Author Affiliation
Informatics, School of Business, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2017; 245:798-802
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Access to Information
Electronic Health Records
Health Records, Personal
Humans
Patient-Centered Care
Sweden
Telemedicine
Abstract
In Sweden, all citizens can (in 2017) access their health data online from all county councils using one national eHealth service. However, depending on where the patient lives, different information is provided as care providers have assessed differently how to apply the National Regulatory Framework (NRF). The NRF recently was updated and this paper analyses version 2.0 should now serve as the guideline for all county councils. Potential improvements are analyzed in relation to patient experiences of using the service, and the rationale for each change in the NRF is discussed. Two real case quotations are used to illustrate potential implications for the patient when the new version is placed into operation. Results indicate that this NRF allows for opportunities to create a national eHealth service that better supports patient-centered care and improves health information outcome.
PubMed ID
29295208 View in PubMed
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599 records – page 1 of 60.