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2783 records – page 1 of 279.

Canadians grow dissatisfied with their healthcare system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198656
Source
BMJ. 2000 May 13;320(7245):1295
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-13-2000
Author
D. Spurgeon
Source
BMJ. 2000 May 13;320(7245):1295
Date
May-13-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Services - standards - trends
Humans
Patient satisfaction
PubMed ID
10807615 View in PubMed
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Patients are destined to manage their care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162491
Source
Healthc Q. 2007;10(3):76-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Kevin J Leonard
David Wiljer
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Ontario. k.leonard@utoronto.ca
Source
Healthc Q. 2007;10(3):76-8
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
National Health Programs
Patient Participation
Patient satisfaction
Abstract
Patients must be able to access their own personal health information in order, ultimately, to partner with providers in the management of their health and wellness care. Just as customers accessing their information have reduced costs in other industries, such as banking, the same may hold true in healthcare.
PubMed ID
17626550 View in PubMed
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Source
Can Nurse. 1999 Nov;95(10):3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1999
Author
J. Haines
Source
Can Nurse. 1999 Nov;95(10):3
Date
Nov-1999
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Manitoba
Patient satisfaction
Right to Die
Terminal Care - psychology
PubMed ID
11140038 View in PubMed
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Anchorage health needs assessment study: the consumer's health survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290922
Source
Anchorage (Alaska) Urban Observatory. 108 leaves.
Publication Type
Report
Date
1979
Author
Ender, Richard L.
Source
Anchorage (Alaska) Urban Observatory. 108 leaves.
Date
1979
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
University of Alaska Fairbanks
Keywords
Alaska
Anchorage
Patient satisfaction
Health Behavior
Health attitudes
Health Surveys
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RA448.A5E525 1979
UAF - ALASKA RA448.A5A525
"Final research report, Anchorage Urban Observatory Program, May 1979."
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Key dimensions of client satisfaction with assistive technology: a cross-validation of a Canadian measure in The Netherlands.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193689
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2001 Jul;33(4):187-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2001
Author
L. Demers
R. Wessels
R. Weiss-Lambrou
B. Ska
L P De Witte
Author Affiliation
Centre for Clinical Epidemiology and Community Studies, Sir Mortimer B. Davis Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ldemers@epid.jgh.mcgill.ca
Source
J Rehabil Med. 2001 Jul;33(4):187-91
Date
Jul-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Netherlands
Patient satisfaction
Questionnaires
Self-Help Devices - standards
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to conduct a cross-validation of the bidimensional structure of a satisfaction measure with assistive technology. Data were drawn from a follow-up study of 243 subjects who had been administered the Dutch version of the Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with assistive Technology (QUEST). Ratings related to 12 satisfaction items were analysed. Factor analysis results showed that the underlying structure of satisfaction with assistive technology consists of two dimensions related to assistive technology, Device (eight items) and Services (four items), accounting for 40% of the common variance. This finding was consistent with a previous Canadian study and was interpreted as supporting the adequacy and stability of the QUEST measure of satisfaction. Although the structure is delineated, further studies are recommended to support its use in European countries.
PubMed ID
11506218 View in PubMed
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[Health service for physicians. What do physicians want--form and substance?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213656
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Dec 10;115(30):3788-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-10-1995
Author
O. Thorsen
E. Haga
Author Affiliation
Rogaland psykiatriske sjukehus, Avdeling Stavanger.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Dec 10;115(30):3788-90
Date
Dec-10-1995
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care Facilities - standards
Humans
Norway
Patient satisfaction
Physicians
Questionnaires
Abstract
In 1991, a special health service for doctors was started in Rogaland county. Three years later this service was evaluated via a questionnaire. Two thirds of 109 doctors were very satisfied, and only one was dissatisfied with this health service. The results show a need for both psychosocial and somatic health examinations for doctors.
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Feb 10;116(4):533; author reply 5348644059
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Feb 10;116(4):533; author reply 5348644060
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Mar 10;116(7):8938644105
PubMed ID
8539753 View in PubMed
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Patient satisfaction after knee arthroplasty: a report on 27,372 knees operated on between 1981 and 1995 in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197703
Source
Acta Orthop Scand. 2000 Jun;71(3):262-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2000
Author
O. Robertsson
M. Dunbar
T. Pehrsson
K. Knutson
L. Lidgren
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedics, Lund University Hospital, Sweden. otto.robertsson@ort.lu.se
Source
Acta Orthop Scand. 2000 Jun;71(3):262-7
Date
Jun-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee
Humans
Patient satisfaction
Postoperative Complications
Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
During a validation process of the Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Register (SKAR), living registered patients were sent a questionnaire to ask if they had been reoperated on. This gave an opportunity to pose a simple four-point question with respect to patient satisfaction which 95% of patients answered. We analyzed the answers of patients operated on between 1981 and 1995 and found that only 8% of the patients were dissatisfied regarding their knee arthroplasty 2-17 years postoperatively. The satisfaction rate was constant, regardless of when the operation had been performed during the 15-year period. The proportion of satisfied patients was affected by the preoperative diagnosis, patients operated on for a long-standing disease more often being satisfied than those with a short disease-duration. There was no difference in proportions of satisfied patients, whether they had primarily been operated on with a total knee arthroplasty (TKA) or a medial unicompartmental arthroplasty (UKA). For TKAs performed with primary patellar resurfacing, there was a higher ratio of satisfied patients than for TKAs not resurfaced, but this increased ratio diminished with time passed since the primary operation. Unrevised knees had a higher proportion of satisfied patients than knees that had been subject to revision, and among patients revised for medial UKA, the proportion of satisfied patients was higher than among patients revised for TKA. We conclude that satisfaction after knee arthroplasty is stable and long-lasting in unrevised cases and that even after revision most patients are satisfied.
PubMed ID
10919297 View in PubMed
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Anchorage health needs assessment study : attitudes and behavior toward public health services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290921
Source
Anchorage (Alaska) Urban Observatory. 24 leaves.
Publication Type
Report
Author
Ender, Richard L.
Source
Anchorage (Alaska) Urban Observatory. 24 leaves.
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Anchorage
Healht attitudes
Health Behavior
Patient satisfaction
Physicians
Health Surveys
Notes
ALASKA RA448.A5E52 1979
Technical report (Anchorage Urban Observatory) no. HC-3
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Creative response to alternative medicine: clients of a modern Finnish healer in a northwestern Ontario city.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198753
Source
Qual Health Res. 2000 Mar;10(2):214-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
R. Warkentin
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, ON, Canada. rwarkent@sky.lakeheadu.ca
Source
Qual Health Res. 2000 Mar;10(2):214-24
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Complementary Therapies
Creativity
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Ontario
Patient satisfaction
Questionnaires
Abstract
Antti Auttaja is a Finnish Canadian businessman who practices alternative medicine in a northwestern Ontario city. His healing method involves pressing his hands and fingers firmly but gently on the feet, wrists, stomach, chest, and other bodily areas of his clients, who recline on their backs on the floor, with pillows propped under their head and knees. His clients respect him and his healing ability, and as the questionnaire and interview data presented in this article clearly show, they feel he has helped them enhance their quality of life in a way that is unique to him and very special to them. He exemplifies a holistic healer working along the periphery of the modern biomedical system. His practice exemplifies the alternative medicine category of the domain of nonconventional medicine.
PubMed ID
10788284 View in PubMed
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Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Mar 20;119(8):1197
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-1999
Author
K. Malterud
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Mar 20;119(8):1197
Date
Mar-20-1999
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Norway
Patient satisfaction
Women's health
Women's Health Services - economics
PubMed ID
10228431 View in PubMed
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2783 records – page 1 of 279.