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The 6 dimensions of promising practice for case managed supports to end homelessness: part 2: the 6 dimensions of quality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129049
Source
Prof Case Manag. 2012 Jan-Feb;17(1):4-12; quiz 13-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Katrina Milaney
Author Affiliation
Calgary Homeless Foundation, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. kmilaney@calgaryhomeless.com
Source
Prof Case Manag. 2012 Jan-Feb;17(1):4-12; quiz 13-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Case Management - standards - statistics & numerical data
Cooperative Behavior
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration - standards
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Homeless Persons - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Patient care team
Patient-Centered Care - methods
Physician's Practice Patterns - standards - statistics & numerical data
Professional Competence
Quality of Health Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Homelessness is a social condition increasing in frequency and severity across Canada. Interventions to end and prevent homelessness include effective case management in addition to an affordable housing provision. Little standardization exists for service providers to guide their decision making in developing and maintaining effective case management programs. The purpose of this 2-part article is to articulate dimensions of promising practice for case managers working in a "Housing First" context. Part 1 discusses research processes and findings and Part 2 articulates the 6 dimensions of quality.
Practice settings include community-based organizations that employ and support case managers whose primary role is moving people from homelessness into permanent supportive housing.
Six dimensions of promising practice are critically important to reducing barriers, improving sector collaboration, and ensuring that case managers have appropriate and effective training and support. Dimensions of promising practice are (1) collaboration and cooperation-a true team approach; (2) right matching of services-person-centered; (3) contextual case management-culture and flexibility; (4) the right kind of engagement-relationships and advocacy; (5) coordinated and well-managed system-ethics and communication; and (6) evaluation for success-support and training.
Effective, coordinated case management, in addition to permanent affordable housing has the potential to reduce a person's or family's homelessness permanently. Organizations and professionals working in this context have the opportunity to improve processes, reduce burnout, collaborate and standardize, and, most importantly, efficiently and permanently end someone's homelessness with the help of dimensions of quality for case management.
PubMed ID
22146635 View in PubMed
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A 7-year follow-up of multidisciplinary rehabilitation among chronic neck and back pain patients. Is sick leave outcome dependent on psychologically derived patient groups?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149098
Source
Eur J Pain. 2010 Apr;14(4):426-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Gunnar Bergström
Cecilia Bergström
Jan Hagberg
Lennart Bodin
Irene Jensen
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Division of Intervention and Implementation Research, Department of Public Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Pain. 2010 Apr;14(4):426-33
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Back Pain - classification - psychology - rehabilitation
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Costs and Cost Analysis
Disability Evaluation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Income
Male
Middle Aged
Neck Pain - classification - psychology - rehabilitation
Pain Measurement
Patient care team
Pensions
Prognosis
Risk
Sick Leave - economics - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
A valid method for classifying chronic pain patients into more homogenous groups could be useful for treatment planning, that is, which treatment is effective for which patient, and as a marker when evaluating treatment outcome. One instrument that has been used to derive subgroups of patients is the Multidimensional Pain Inventory (MPI). The primary aim of this study was to evaluate a classification method based on the Swedish version of the MPI, the MPI-S, to predict sick leave among chronic neck and back pain patients for a period of 7 years after vocational rehabilitation. As hypothesized, dysfunctional patients (DYS), according to the MPI-S, showed a higher amount of sickness absence and disability pension expressed in days than adaptive copers (AC) during the 7-years follow-up period, even when adjusting for sickness absence prior to rehabilitation (355.8days, 95% confidence interval, 71.7; 639.9). Forty percent of DYS patients and 26.7% of AC patients received disability pension during the follow-up period. However, this difference was not statistically significant. Further analyses showed that the difference between patient groups was most pronounced among patients with more than 60days of sickness absence prior to rehabilitation. Cost-effectiveness calculations indicated that the DYS patients showed an increase in production loss compared to AC patients. The present study yields support for the prognostic value of this subgroup classification method concerning long-term outcome on sick leave following this type of vocational rehabilitation.
PubMed ID
19683950 View in PubMed
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[12 years of cross-professional team work in childbirth in Herlev]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65229
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1990 Jan 17;90(3):24-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-17-1990

18F-FDG PET imaging of myocardial viability in an experienced center with access to 18F-FDG and integration with clinical management teams: the Ottawa-FIVE substudy of the PARR 2 trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144812
Source
J Nucl Med. 2010 Apr;51(4):567-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Arun Abraham
Graham Nichol
Kathryn A Williams
Ann Guo
Robert A deKemp
Linda Garrard
Ross A Davies
Lloyd Duchesne
Haissam Haddad
Benjamin Chow
Jean DaSilva
Rob S B Beanlands
Author Affiliation
National Cardiac PET Centre and Division of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Research Methods Centre, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Nucl Med. 2010 Apr;51(4):567-74
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Coronary Artery Disease - physiopathology - radionuclide imaging
Female
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 - diagnostic use
Heart - physiopathology - radionuclide imaging
Heart Failure - physiopathology - radionuclide imaging
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Revascularization
Patient care team
Positron-Emission Tomography
Professional Competence
Radiopharmaceuticals - diagnostic use
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Survival Analysis
Tissue Survival
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - physiopathology - radionuclide imaging
Abstract
(18)F-FDG PET may assist decision making in ischemic cardiomyopathy. The PET and Recovery Following Revascularization (PARR 2) trial demonstrated a trend toward beneficial outcomes with PET-assisted management. The substudy of PARR 2 that we call Ottawa-FIVE, described here, was a post hoc analysis to determine the benefit of PET in a center with experience, ready access to (18)F-FDG, and integration with clinical teams.
Included were patients with left ventricular dysfunction and suspected coronary artery disease being considered for revascularization. The patients had been randomized in PARR 2 to PET-assisted management (group 1) or standard care (group 2) and had been enrolled in Ottawa after August 1, 2002 (the date that on-site (18)F-FDG was initiated) (n = 111). The primary outcome was the composite endpoint of cardiac death, myocardial infarction, or cardiac rehospitalization within 1 y. Data were compared with the rest of PARR 2 (PET-assisted management [group 3] or standard care [group 4]).
In the Ottawa-FIVE subgroup of PARR 2, the cumulative proportion of patients experiencing the composite event was 19% (group 1), versus 41% (group 2). Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression showed a benefit for the PET-assisted strategy (hazard ratio, 0.34; 95% confidence interval, 0.16-0.72; P = 0.005). Compared with other patients in PARR 2, Ottawa-FIVE patients had a lower ejection fraction (25% +/- 7% vs. 27% +/- 8%, P = 0.04), were more often female (24% vs. 13%, P = 0.006), tended to be older (64 +/- 10 y vs. 62 +/- 10 y, P = 0.07), and had less previous coronary artery bypass grafting (13% vs. 21%, P = 0.07). For patients in the rest of PARR 2, there was no significant difference in events between groups 3 and 4. The observed effect of (18)F-FDG PET-assisted management in the 4 groups in the context of adjusted survival curves demonstrated a significant interaction (P = 0.016). Comparisons of the 2 arms in Ottawa-FIVE to the 2 arms in the rest of PARR 2 demonstrated a trend toward significance (standard care, P = 0.145; PET-assisted management, P = 0.057).
In this post hoc group analysis, a significant reduction in cardiac events was observed in patients with (18)F-FDG PET-assisted management, compared with patients who received standard care. The results suggest that outcome may be benefited using (18)F-FDG PET in an experienced center with ready access to (18)F-FDG and integration with imaging, heart failure, and revascularization teams.
Notes
Comment In: J Nucl Med. 2010 Apr;51(4):505-620237024
PubMed ID
20237039 View in PubMed
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2006 Canadian clinical practice guidelines on the management and prevention of obesity in adults and children [summary].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164223
Source
CMAJ. 2007 Apr 10;176(8):S1-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-10-2007
Author
David C W Lau
James D Douketis
Katherine M Morrison
Irene M Hramiak
Arya M Sharma
Ehud Ur
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Julia McFarlane Diabetes Research Centre, Diabetes and Endocrine Research Group, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alta. dcwlau@ucalgary.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2007 Apr 10;176(8):S1-13
Date
Apr-10-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Algorithms
Anti-Obesity Agents - therapeutic use
Bariatric Surgery
Behavior Therapy
Body mass index
Bulimia Nervosa - psychology
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Depressive Disorder - psychology
Diet
Disease Management
Evidence-Based Medicine
Exercise
Health Behavior
Health education
Humans
Life Style
Obesity - classification - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Patient care team
Research - trends
Waist-Hip Ratio
Notes
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Comment In: CMAJ. 2007 Nov 20;177(11):139118025434
PubMed ID
17420481 View in PubMed
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The ability of general practitioners to detect mental disorders in primary health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216423
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Jan;91(1):52-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1995
Author
M. Joukamaa
V. Lehtinen
H. Karlsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku, Finland.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Jan;91(1):52-6
Date
Jan-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Graduate
Family Practice - education
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Patient care team
Primary Health Care
Psychiatry - education
Psychophysiologic Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Sampling Studies
Somatoform Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Abstract
The ability to detect mental disorders varies greatly among general practitioners in primary health care. The aim of this study was to determine the factors underlying the differences between general practitioners in the ability to recognize mental disorders in Finnish patient populations. The group studied consisted of 1000 randomly selected adult patients of primary care facilities in the city of Turku. The Symptom Checklist (SCL-25) was used as the reference method in the identification of psychiatric cases. According to the SCL-25, one fourth of the sample had mental disorders. A good recognition ability was associated with postgraduate psychiatric training and qualification as a specialist in general practice. Surprisingly, Balint group training, which is a method intended to improve the ability of general practitioners to manage their patients' mental health problems, was associated rather with poor than good detection ability.
Notes
Comment In: Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1995 Oct;92(4):3198848961
PubMed ID
7754788 View in PubMed
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Academic administrators' attitudes towards interprofessional education in Canadian schools of health professional education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173370
Source
J Interprof Care. 2005 May;19 Suppl 1:76-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Vernon R Curran
Diana R Deacon
Lisa Fleet
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, Canada. vcurran@mun.ca
Source
J Interprof Care. 2005 May;19 Suppl 1:76-86
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel - psychology
Attitude
Canada
Cooperative Behavior
Education, Professional - organization & administration
Health Occupations - education
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Patient care team
Patient-Centered Care
Questionnaires
Schools, Health Occupations
Abstract
Interprofessional education is an approach to educating and training students and practitioners from different health professions to work in a collaborative manner in providing client and/or patient-centred care. The introduction and successful implementation of this educational approach is dependent on a variety of factors, including the attitudes of students, faculty, senior academic administrators (e.g., deans and directors) and practitioners. The purpose of this study was to examine attitudes towards interprofessional teamwork and interprofessional education amongst academic administrators of post-secondary health professional education programs in Canada. A web-based questionnaire in English and French was distributed via e-mail messaging during January 2004 to academic administrators in Canada representing medicine, nursing, pharmacy, social work, occupational therapy and physiotherapy post-secondary educational programs. Responses were sought on attitudes towards interprofessional teamwork and interprofessional education, as well as opinions regarding barriers to interprofessional education and subject areas that lend themselves to interprofessional education. In general, academic administrators responding to the survey hold overall positive attitudes towards interprofessional teamwork and interprofessional education practices, and the results indicate there were no significant differences between professions in relation to these attitudinal perspectives. The main barriers to interprofessional education were problems with scheduling/calendar, rigid curriculum, turf battles and lack of perceived value. The main pre-clinical subject areas which respondents believed would lend themselves to interprofessional education included community health/prevention, ethics, communications, critical appraisal, and epidemiology. The results of this study suggest that a favourable perception of both interprofessional teamwork and interprofessional education exists amongst academic administrators of Canadian health professional education programs. If this is the case, the post-secondary system in Canada is primed for the introduction of interprofessional education initiatives which support the development of client and patient-centred collaborative practice competencies.
PubMed ID
16096147 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Wien Med Wochenschr. 1995;145(6):143-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
K H Beine
Author Affiliation
Hans-Prinzhorn-Klinik, Hemer.
Source
Wien Med Wochenschr. 1995;145(6):143-7
Date
1995
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Austria
Cause of Death
English Abstract
Euthanasia - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Homicide - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Liability, Legal
Male
Nursing Staff, Hospital - legislation & jurisprudence
Patient Care Team - legislation & jurisprudence
Professional Impairment - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
The phenomenon of patient homicides committed by health service employees has, in the previous years, repeatedly aroused much attention. The cases made known in Germany, the USA, Holland, Norway, and Austria appear to provide evidence to the effect that we are not only dealing with unique incidents. The scientific investigation of this especially sensitive taboo-topic is, to date, missing. The judicial trials carried out emphatically indicate that culprit motives, colleague behavior, but also to a large extent decisions made by superiors remain unclear. It remains controversial, what effect working conditions, strain of employees, their level of education and personal viewpoints over such criminal acts they possess. Finally, the long latency period between the first internal suspicions and the responsible parties' appropriate reactions requires duplicatable explanation. The following paper presents a German single-case study of patient homicide by a female nurse. The focus on causality rests on the presentation of developments up to the point where the long-fermenting suspicion could no longer be dismissed, and appropriate consequences took place. The account largely avoids the "definite" findings required during the judicial process. It concerns rather above all an open, uncertain, and possibly without external influence course of development which in stages each colleague in the health professions can trace, to the point where the uncertain and horrifying suspicion became a certainty. With this single-case study in hand it is made understandable in which ways personal circumstances and professional conditions at the worksituation can intertwine in such a way that the original motivation to help turns into its abysmal opposite. It is the author's intention to make preventive learning possible through this single case study. Every employee in the health professions should proceed on the assumption that such occurrences could also in his own field of work come to pass. In this respect, it is of considerable importance to differentiate between hasty and untenable incriminations and original increasing early-warning signs.
PubMed ID
7785282 View in PubMed
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Acceptance and importance of clinical pharmacists' LIMM-based recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127887
Source
Int J Clin Pharm. 2012 Apr;34(2):272-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Asa Bondesson
Lydia Holmdahl
Patrik Midlöv
Peter Höglund
Emmy Andersson
Tommy Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. asa.c.bondesson@skane.se
Source
Int J Clin Pharm. 2012 Apr;34(2):272-6
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Attitude of Health Personnel
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Male
Medication Errors - prevention & control
Medication Reconciliation - organization & administration
Medication Therapy Management - organization & administration - standards
Middle Aged
Models, organizational
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Pharmacists - organization & administration - psychology
Pharmacy Service, Hospital - organization & administration - standards
Physicians - psychology
Quality of Health Care - organization & administration - standards
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sweden
Abstract
The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of the clinical pharmacy service in a Swedish hospital according to the Lund Integrated Medicine Management (LIMM) model, in terms of the acceptance and clinical significance of the recommendations made by clinical pharmacists.
The clinical significance of the recommendations made by clinical pharmacists was assessed for a random sample of inpatients receiving the clinical pharmacy service in 2007. Two independent physicians retrospectively ranked the recommendations emerging from errors in the patients' current medication list and actual drug-related problems according to Hatoum, with rankings ranging between 1 (adverse significance) and 6 (extremely significant).
The random sample comprised 132 patients (out of 800 receiving the service). The clinical significance of 197 recommendations was assessed. The physicians accepted and implemented 178 (90%) of the clinical pharmacists' recommendations. Most of these recommendations, 170 (83%), were ranked 3 (somewhat significant) or higher.
This study provides further evidence of the quality of the LIMM model and confirms that the inclusion of clinical pharmacists in a multi-professional team can improve drug therapy for inpatients. The very high level of acceptance by the physicians of the pharmacists' recommendations further demonstrates the effectiveness of the process.
PubMed ID
22252773 View in PubMed
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2018 records – page 1 of 202.