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The 13th Annual International Symposium in obesity: bariatric/metabolic surgery: how it influences energy balance regulation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131119
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2011 Sep;35 Suppl 3:S1-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
D. Richard
P. Boisvert
Author Affiliation
Merck Frosst/CIHR Research Chair in Obesity, Centre de recherche de l'Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec, Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval, Québec, Canada. Denis.Richard@criucpq.ulaval.ca
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2011 Sep;35 Suppl 3:S1-2
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bariatric Surgery - methods - statistics & numerical data
Canada - epidemiology
Congresses as topic
Energy Metabolism
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Obesity, Morbid - epidemiology - metabolism - surgery
Patient Selection
PubMed ID
21912380 View in PubMed
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A1C variability predicts incident cardiovascular events, microalbuminuria, and overt diabetic nephropathy in patients with type 1 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149324
Source
Diabetes. 2009 Nov;58(11):2649-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Johan Wadén
Carol Forsblom
Lena M Thorn
Daniel Gordin
Markku Saraheimo
Per-Henrik Groop
Author Affiliation
Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland. per-henrik.groop@helsinki.fi
Source
Diabetes. 2009 Nov;58(11):2649-55
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Albuminuria - epidemiology
Autoanalysis - methods
Biological Markers - blood
Blood pressure
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - mortality
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood
Diabetic Angiopathies - epidemiology - mortality
Diabetic Nephropathies - epidemiology - mortality
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Glucose - metabolism
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - epidemiology
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Selection
Predictive value of tests
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Abstract
Recent data from the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) indicated that A1C variability is associated with the risk of diabetes microvascular complications. However, these results might have been influenced by the interventional study design. Therefore, we investigated the longitudinal associations between A1C variability and diabetes complications in patients with type 1 diabetes in the observational Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy (FinnDiane) Study.
A total of 2,107 patients in the FinnDiane Study had complete data on renal status and serial measurements of A1C from baseline to follow-up (median 5.7 years), and 1,845 patients had similar data on cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. Intrapersonal SD of serially measured A1C was considered a measure of variability.
During follow-up, 10.2% progressed to a higher albuminuria level or to end-stage renal disease, whereas 8.6% had a CVD event. The SD of serial A1C was 1.01 versus 0.75 (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
19651819 View in PubMed
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Acarbose for the prevention of Type 2 diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance: facts and interpretations concerning the critical analysis of the STOP-NIDDM Trial data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179962
Source
Diabetologia. 2004 Jun;47(6):969-75; discussion 976-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
J-L Chiasson
R G Josse
R. Gomis
M. Hanefeld
A. Karasik
M. Laakso
Author Affiliation
Research Centre, Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal-Hôtel-Dieu, Department of Medicine, University of Montreal, 3850 St. Urbain Street, Rm 8-202, Montreal, Quebec H2W 1T7, Canada. jean.louis.chiasson@umontreal.ca
Source
Diabetologia. 2004 Jun;47(6):969-75; discussion 976-7
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acarbose - therapeutic use
Blood Glucose - chemistry
Body Weight - drug effects
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - complications - drug therapy - prevention & control
Clinical Protocols
Data Collection - ethics - methods
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - drug therapy - prevention & control
Double-Blind Method
Eating - physiology
Ethics, Clinical
Fasting - blood
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glucose Intolerance - complications - drug therapy - prevention & control
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Selection
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Reproducibility of Results
Research Design
Risk Reduction Behavior
Stroke - classification - etiology - prevention & control
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Withholding Treatment - ethics
Abstract
The STOP-NIDDM Trial has shown that acarbose treatment in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance is associated with a significant risk reduction in the development of diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular complications. Kaiser and Sawicki have accused the investigators of the STOP-NIDDM Trial of major biases in the conduct of the study, of manipulating the data and of conflict of interest. The aim of this paper is to present data and explanations refuting these allegations. In the STOP-NIDDM Trial, 61 subjects were excluded from the efficacy analysis before unblinding for legitimate reasons: failure to satisfy major entry criteria (n=17) and lack of post-randomisation data (n=44). Blinding and randomisation were carried out by an independent biostatistician. Titration of placebo/acarbose is well described in the protocol and in the study design paper. Of the study population, 9.3% had a fasting plasma glucose of > or =7.0 mmol/l at screening and could have been diabetic according to the new diagnostic criteria. However, even if these subjects are excluded, patients having acarbose treatment still saw a significant risk reduction in the development of diabetes (p=0.0027). The changes in weight are consistent in different publications and are related to different times of follow-up and assessment. Weight change does have an effect on the development of diabetes, but acarbose treatment is still effective even after adjusting for this (p=0.0063). The cardiovascular endpoints were a clearly designated assessment in the original protocol, and only those defined in the protocol and ascertained by the independent Cardiovascular Event Adjudication Committee were used in the analysis. Hypertension was defined according to the most recent diagnostic criteria. The STOP-NIDDM Trial results are scientifically sound and credible. The investigators stand strongly behind these results demonstrating that acarbose treatment is associated with a delay in the development of diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular complications in a high-risk population with IGT.
Notes
Comment In: Diabetologia. 2004 Jun;47(6):976-715150689
Comment On: Diabetologia. 2004 Mar;47(3):575-8014727025
PubMed ID
15164169 View in PubMed
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Acceptability and profile of the clinical drug trials underway in Finnish university hospitals in the 1990s: applications reviewed by ethics committees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192044
Source
Methods Find Exp Clin Pharmacol. 2001 Sep;23(7):415-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
T. Keinonen
S. Nieminen
V. Saareks
V. Saano
P. Ylitalo
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Kuopio, Finland. tuija.keinonen@medfiles.fi
Source
Methods Find Exp Clin Pharmacol. 2001 Sep;23(7):415-23
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Protocols - standards
Clinical Trials Data Monitoring Committees - statistics & numerical data
Clinical Trials as Topic - standards - statistics & numerical data
Ethics Committees, Research - statistics & numerical data
Finland
Hospitals, University - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Informed Consent - statistics & numerical data
Multicenter Studies as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Patient Selection
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Research Design - standards - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
There is scarce information in literature about the decisions made by ethics committees concerning the clinical studies they have reviewed. A retrospective, detailed review of 666 applications, their amendments and the ethics committees' statements was undertaken. All protrocols of clinical studies on medicinal products submitted to and reviewed by the ethics committees of two university hospitals during the years 1992, 1994, 1996 and 1998 were investigated. Most of the studies were international (50%), multicenter (71%), phase III trials (41%) on a new clinical entity, (38%). Validity of the clinical drug study applications was acceptable in more than half of the cases (364; 55%), while 91 (14%) were approved with advisory comments, 153 (23%) had to be amended, 35 (5%) were left pending and 23 (3%) were rejected. Most of the questions pertained to informed consent and the study protcol. In accordance with precious results, our findings support the opinion that the submitted documents need to be improved, especially with regard to informed consent and study protocols, in order to gain better Good Clinical Practice (GCP) compliance. Well-defined, documented operating procedures of the ethics committees would have facilitated the practical issues in the review process.
PubMed ID
11771857 View in PubMed
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Acception of cholesterol from cells in men of the Russian population correlates with concentration of pre-beta1 high-density lipoproteins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182095
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2003 Oct;136(4):366-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
A P Serdyuk
K. Lasselin
G. Castro
O A Litinskaya
G. Frushar
V A Metel'skaya
Author Affiliation
Department of Metabolic Disorders, State Research Center for Preventive Medicine, Russian Ministry of Health, Moscow. vicamet@orc.ru
Source
Bull Exp Biol Med. 2003 Oct;136(4):366-8
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Apolipoprotein A-I - blood
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular - chemistry
Cell Line, Tumor
Chemical Fractionation
Cholesterol - blood - chemistry - metabolism
Cholesterol, HDL - blood - chemistry - isolation & purification
Electrophoresis, Gel, Two-Dimensional
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Selection
Phosphatidylcholine-Sterol O-Acyltransferase - blood
Rats
Russia - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
We analyzed subfraction composition of HDL and cholesterol-acceptor properties of the plasma in Russian men with high and low HDL cholesterol. HDL were subfractionated by two-dimensional electrophoresis in agarose-polyacrylamide gel. The content of pre-beta1 HDL increased in individuals with high concentration of HDL cholesterol and strictly correlated with acception of cellular cholesterol in both groups.
PubMed ID
14714084 View in PubMed
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Accessing health services through the back door: a qualitative interview study investigating reasons why people participate in health research in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257231
Source
BMC Med Ethics. 2013;14:40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Anne Townsend
Susan M Cox
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of British Columbia, Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2B5, Canada. atownsen@exchange.ubc.ca.
Source
BMC Med Ethics. 2013;14:40
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Altruism
Biomedical research
British Columbia
Communication
Comprehension
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Motivation
Patient Selection
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Research Subjects - psychology
Therapeutic Misconception
Abstract
Although there is extensive information about why people participate in clinical trials, studies are largely based on quantitative evidence and typically focus on single conditions. Over the last decade investigations into why people volunteer for health research have become increasingly prominent across diverse research settings, offering variable based explanations of participation patterns driven primarily by recruitment concerns. Therapeutic misconception and altruism have emerged as predominant themes in this literature on motivations to participate in health research. This paper contributes to more recent qualitative approaches to understanding how and why people come to participate in various types of health research. We focus on the experience of participating and the meanings research participation has for people within the context of their lives and their health and illness biographies.
This is a qualitative exploratory study informed by grounded theory strategies. Thirty-nine participants recruited in British Columbia and Manitoba, Canada, who had taken part in a diverse range of health research studies participated in semi-structured interviews. Participants described their experiences of health research participation including motivations for volunteering. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using constant comparisons. Coding and data management was supported by Nvivo-7.
A predominant theme to emerge was 'participation in health research to access health services.' Participants described research as ways of accessing: (1) Medications that offered (hope of) relief; (2) better care; (3) technologies for monitoring health or illness. Participants perceived standard medical care to be a "trial and error" process akin to research, which further blurred the boundaries between research and treatment.
Our findings have implications for recruitment, informed consent, and the dichotomizing of medical/health procedures as either research or treatment. Those with low health status may be more vulnerable to potential coercion, suggesting the need for a more cautious approach to obtaining consent. Our findings also indicate the need for boundary work in order to better differentiate treatment and research. It is important however to acknowledge a categorical ambiguity; it is not always the case that people are misinformed about the possible benefits of research procedures (i.e., therapeutic misconception); our participants were aware that the primary purpose of research is to gain new knowledge yet they also identified a range of actual health benefits arising from their participation.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24119203 View in PubMed
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Access to adult liver transplantation in Canada: a survey and ethical analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212821
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Feb 1;154(3):337-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-1996
Author
M A Mullen
N. Kohut
M. Sam
L. Blendis
P A Singer
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto Joint Centre for Bioethics, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 1996 Feb 1;154(3):337-42
Date
Feb-1-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Data Collection
Health Care Rationing - organization & administration
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Humans
Liver Transplantation
Organizational Policy
Patient Selection
Resource Allocation
Waiting Lists
Abstract
To describe the substantive and procedural criteria used for placing patients on the waiting list for liver transplantation and for allocating available livers to patients on the waiting list; to identify principal decision-makers and the main factors limiting liver transplantation in Canada; and to examine how closely cadaveric liver allocation resembles theoretic models of source allocation.
Mailed survey.
Medical directors of all seven Canadian adult liver transplantation centres, or their designates. Six of the questionnaires were completed.
Relative importance of substantive and procedural criteria used to place patients in the waiting list for liver transplantation and to allocate available livers. Identification of principal decision-makers and main limiting factors to adult liver transplantation.
Alcoholism, drug addiction, HIV positivity, primary liver cancer, noncompliance and hepatitis B were the most important criteria that had a negative influence on decisions to place patients on the waiting list for liver transplantation. Severity of disease and urgency were the most important criteria used for selecting patients on the waiting list for transplantation. Criteria that were inconsistent across the centres included social support (for deciding who is placed on the waiting list) and length of time on the waiting list (for deciding who is selected from the list). Although a variety of people were reported as being involved in these decisions, virtually all were reported to be health to be health care professionals. Thirty-seven patients died while waiting for liver transplantation in 1991; the scarcity of cadaveric livers was the main limiting factor.
Criteria for resource allocation decisions regarding liver transplantation are generally consistent among the centres across Canada, although some important inconsistencies remain. Because patients die while on the waiting list and because the primary limiting factor is organ supply, increased organ acquisition efforts are needed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
8564903 View in PubMed
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Access to kidney transplantation: the limitations of our current understanding.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160974
Source
J Nephrol. 2007 Sep-Oct;20(5):501-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
John S Gill
Olwyn Johnston
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, St Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia - Canada. jgill@providencehealth.bc.ca
Source
J Nephrol. 2007 Sep-Oct;20(5):501-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Research - methods - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Kidney Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Living Donors
Patient Selection
Registries
Renal Insufficiency - epidemiology - surgery
Residence Characteristics
Time Factors
Tissue and Organ Procurement - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
United States - epidemiology
Waiting Lists
Abstract
Since kidney transplantation (KTX) is the preferred means of treating kidney failure, ensuring that all patients who may benefit from KTX have equal access to this scarce resource is an important objective. Studies focusing on this issue will become increasingly important as the gap between the demand and supply of organs continues to increase, and changes to the United Network of Organ Sharing organ allocation policy are actively debated. However, it is clear that current methods used to study access to KTX have serious limitations. This review highlights the shortcomings of the methods currently used to assess access to KTX, and the limitations of registry data and national wait-list data as information sources to study patient access to KTX. The review also provides suggestions for research and analytical approaches that might be utilized to improve our future understanding of patient access to KTX. The information provided will aid the reader to critically assess issues related to patient access to KTX.
PubMed ID
17918132 View in PubMed
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1242 records – page 1 of 125.