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267 records – page 1 of 27.

[Abortion committees and women's rights]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63678
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Jan 10;121(1):17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-10-2001
Author
P. Aavitsland
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Jan 10;121(1):17
Date
Jan-10-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Legal
Female
Humans
Norway
Patient Rights
Pregnancy
Women's Rights
PubMed ID
12013608 View in PubMed
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Access to health care information: legal imperative or moral responsibility?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104003
Source
Health Law Can. 1990;10(3):213-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990

[Apathetic children exist--and they have the right to health care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118521
Source
Lakartidningen. 2012 Oct 24-Nov 6;109(43-44):1932-3
Publication Type
Article
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2009 Nov 5;129(21):2260-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-5-2009
Author
Bengt Eide-Olsen
Author Affiliation
Stiftelsen Bergensklinikkene Hjellestad, Flyen 30, 5259 Hjellestad, Norway. eide_olsen_bengt@hotmail.com
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2009 Nov 5;129(21):2260-1
Date
Nov-5-2009
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Buprenorphine - therapeutic use
Health Policy
Humans
Methadone - therapeutic use
Narcotics - therapeutic use
Norway
Opioid-Related Disorders - rehabilitation
Patient Rights
PubMed ID
19898579 View in PubMed
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Are Canadians providing advance directives about health care and research participation in the event of decisional incapacity?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135134
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2011 Apr;56(4):209-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Gina Bravo
Marie-France Dubois
Carole Cohen
Sheila Wildeman
Janice Graham
Karen Painter
Suzanne Bellemare
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec. Gina.Bravo@USherbrooke.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2011 Apr;56(4):209-18
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Advance Care Planning - ethics - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Advance Directive Adherence - standards
Advance Directives - ethics - psychology
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Bioethical Issues
Canada
Choice Behavior
Decision Making
Female
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Mental Competency
Middle Aged
Patient Advocacy
Patient Participation - psychology
Patient Rights
Patient Selection - ethics
Physician-Patient Relations - ethics
Abstract
Advance planning for health care and research participation has been promoted as a mechanism to retain some control over one's life, and ease substitute decision making, in the event of decisional incapacity. Limited data are available on Canadians' current advance planning activities. We conducted a postal survey to estimate the frequency with which Canadians communicate their preferences about health care and research should they become incapacitated.
We surveyed 5 populations (older adults, informal caregivers, physicians, researchers in aging, and research ethics board members) from Nova Scotia, Ontario, Alberta, and British Columbia. We asked respondents whether they had expressed their preferences regarding a substitute decision maker, health care, and research participation in the event of incapacity.
Two out of 3 respondents (62.0%; 95% CI 59.1% to 64.8%) had been advised to communicate their health care preferences in advance. Oral expression of wishes was reported by 69.1% of respondents (95% CI 66.8% to 71.3%), and written expression by 46.7% (95% CI 44.3% to 49.2%). Among respondents who had expressed wishes in advance (orally or in writing), 91.2% had chosen a substitute decision maker, 80.9% had voiced health care preferences, and 19.5% had voiced preferences regarding research participation. Having been advised to communicate wishes was a strong predictor of the likelihood of having done so.
Advance planning has increased over the last 2 decades in Canada. Nonetheless, further efforts are needed to encourage Canadians to voice their health care and research preferences in the event of incapacity. Physicians are well situated to promote advance planning to Canadians.
PubMed ID
21507277 View in PubMed
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267 records – page 1 of 27.