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Association Between Distal Radial Fracture Malunion and Patient-Reported Activity Limitations: A Long-Term Follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301170
Source
J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2018 Apr 18; 100(8):633-639
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-18-2018
Author
Muhanned Ali
Elisabeth Brogren
Philippe Wagner
Isam Atroshi
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedics, Kristianstad and Hässleholm Hospitals, Hässleholm, Sweden.
Source
J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2018 Apr 18; 100(8):633-639
Date
Apr-18-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Casts, Surgical
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Persons
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Fracture Fixation - methods
Fracture Healing - physiology
Fractures, Malunited - physiopathology - surgery
Hand Strength - physiology
Humans
Long-Term Care
Male
Middle Aged
Pain Measurement
Pain, Postoperative - etiology - physiopathology
Patient Reported Outcome Measures
Patient satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Radius Fractures - physiopathology - surgery
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Sweden
Wrist Joint - physiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The long-term effect of distal radial fracture malunion on activity limitations is unknown. Between 2001 and 2002, we conducted a prospective cohort study of all patients with distal radial fracture treated with casting or percutaneous fixation in northeast Scania in Sweden. In that original study, the patients completed the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire at baseline and at 2 years. We performed a long-term follow-up study of patients who were 18 to 65 years of age at the time of the fracture to investigate the association between fracture malunion and activity limitations.
In this long-term follow-up, patients who had participated in the original study completed the DASH questionnaire and a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and for satisfaction (scored, 0 [best] to 100) and underwent radiographic and physical examinations at 12 to 14 years after the fracture. We defined malunion as dorsal angulation of =10°, ulnar variance of =3 mm, and/or radial inclination of =15°. We also assessed the presence of radiocarpal osteoarthritis and ulnar styloid nonunion. The primary outcome was the change in DASH score from baseline. Secondary outcomes were DASH, pain, and satisfaction scores, wrist range of motion, and grip strength at the time of the follow-up.
Of 85 eligible patients, 63 (74%) responded to the questionnaires and underwent examinations. Malunion was found in 25 patients, osteoarthritis was found in 38 patients, and styloid nonunion was found in 9 patients. Compared with patients without malunion, those with malunion had significantly worse DASH scores from baseline to 12 to 14 years (p = 0.002); the adjusted mean difference was 11 points (95% confidence interval [CI], 4 to 17 points). Similarly, follow-up scores were significantly worse among patients with malunion; the adjusted mean difference was 14 points (95% CI, 7 to 22 points; p 0.05) with DASH scores, VAS pain or satisfaction scores, or grip strength.
Patients who sustain a distal radial fracture at the age of 18 to 65 years and develop malunion are more likely to have worse long-term outcomes including activity limitations and pain.
Prognostic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.
Notes
CommentIn: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2018 Apr 18;100(8):e52 PMID 29664861
PubMed ID
29664849 View in PubMed
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Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2020 03; 49(2):171-172
Publication Type
Journal Article
Comment
Date
03-2020
Author
O Hofstedt
D Di Giuseppe
G-M Alenius
N Stattin
H Forsblad-D'Elia
L Ljung
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine/Rheumatology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2020 03; 49(2):171-172
Date
03-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Comment
Keywords
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Humans
Internet
Patient Reported Outcome Measures
Rheumatology
Sweden
Notes
CommentOn: Scand J Rheumatol. 2019 Jul;48(4):326-330 PMID 30758242
CommentOn: Scand J Rheumatol. 2020 Mar;49(2):169-170 PMID 32207392
PubMed ID
32207393 View in PubMed
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Cemented or Uncemented Hemiarthroplasty for Femoral Neck Fracture? Data from the Norwegian Hip Fracture Register.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307614
Source
Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2020 01; 478(1):90-100
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
01-2020
Author
Torbjørn B Kristensen
Eva Dybvik
Målfrid Kristoffersen
Håvard Dale
Lars Birger Engesæter
Ove Furnes
Jan-Erik Gjertsen
Author Affiliation
T. B. Kristensen, E. Dybvik, M. Kristoffersen, H. Dale, L. B. Engesæter, O. Furnes, J.-E. Gjertsen, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2020 01; 478(1):90-100
Date
01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bone Cements
Female
Femoral Neck Fractures - surgery
Hemiarthroplasty - methods
Hip Prosthesis
Humans
Male
Norway
Patient Reported Outcome Measures
Prosthesis Design
Prosthesis Failure
Quality of Life
Registries
Reoperation
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
A displaced femoral neck fracture in patients older than 70 years is a serious injury that influences the patient's quality of life and can cause serious complications or death. Previous national guidelines and a Cochrane review have recommended cemented fixation for arthroplasty to treat hip fractures in older patients, but data suggest that these guidelines are inconsistently followed in many parts of the world; the effects of that must be better characterized.
The purpose of this study was to evaluate a large group of patients in the Norwegian Hip Fracture Register to investigate whether the fixation method in hemiarthroplasty is associated with (1) the risk of reoperation; (2) the mortality rate; and (3) patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs).
Longitudinally maintained registry data from the Norwegian Hip Fracture Register with high completeness (93%) and near 100% followup of deaths were used for this report. From 2005 to 2017, 104,993 hip fractures were registered in the Norwegian Hip Fracture Register. Fractures other than intracapsular femoral neck fractures and operative methods other than bipolar hemiarthroplasty, such as osteosynthesis or THA, were excluded. The selection bias risk on using cemented or uncemented hemiarthroplasty is small in Norway because the decision is usually regulated by tender processes at each hospital and not by surgeon. A total of 7539 uncemented hemiarthroplasties (70% women, mean age, 84 years [SD 6] years) and 22,639 cemented hemiarthroplasties (72% women, mean age, 84 years [SD 6] years) were eligible for analysis. Hazard risk ratio (HRR) on reoperation and mortality was calculated in a Cox regression model adjusted for age, sex, comorbidities (according to the American Society of Anesthesiologists classification), cognitive function, surgical approach, and duration of surgery. At 12 months postoperatively, 65% of patients answered questionnaires regarding pain and quality of life, the results of which were compared between the fixation groups.
A higher overall risk of reoperation for any reason was found after uncemented hemiarthroplasty (HRR, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.4-1.7; p
Notes
CommentIn: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2020 Jan;478(1):101-103 PMID 31283735
CommentIn: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2020 Mar;478(3):687-689 PMID 32011373
CommentIn: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2020 Mar;478(3):685-686 PMID 32011377
PubMed ID
31855192 View in PubMed
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Challenges and Opportunities in Using Patient-reported Outcomes in Quality Measurement in Rheumatology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287074
Source
Rheum Dis Clin North Am. 2016 May;42(2):363-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Elizabeth R Wahl
Jinoos Yazdany
Source
Rheum Dis Clin North Am. 2016 May;42(2):363-75
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Data Collection
Humans
Medical Informatics
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Reported Outcome Measures
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Quality of Health Care
Reproducibility of Results
Rheumatology - standards
Sweden
United Kingdom
United States
Abstract
Use of patient-reported outcome measures (PROs) in rheumatology research is widespread, but use of PRO data to evaluate the quality of rheumatologic care delivered is less well established. This article reviews the use of PROs in assessing health care quality, and highlights challenges and opportunities specific to their use in rheumatology quality measurement. It first explores other countries' experiences collecting and evaluating national PRO data to assess quality of care. It describes the current use of PROs as quality measures in rheumatology, and frames an agenda for future work supporting development of meaningful quality measures based on PROs.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27133495 View in PubMed
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Changes in quality of life 5 years after sleeve gastrectomy: a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309025
Source
BMJ Open. 2019 09 12; 9(9):e031170
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-12-2019
Author
Tone Nygaard Flølo
Grethe S Tell
Ronette L Kolotkin
Anny Aasprang
Tone Merete Norekvål
Villy Våge
Karl Ove Hufthammer
John Roger Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Voss Hospital, Haukeland University Hospital, Voss, Norway tone.flolo@helse-bergen.no.
Source
BMJ Open. 2019 09 12; 9(9):e031170
Date
09-12-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Bariatric Surgery - methods - psychology
Body mass index
Female
Humans
Male
Minimal Clinically Important Difference
Norway - epidemiology
Obesity, Morbid - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology - surgery
Patient Reported Outcome Measures
Postoperative Period
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Time
Weight Loss - physiology
Abstract
Sleeve gastrectomy (SG) is the most frequently performed bariatric surgery procedure worldwide, but reports on long-term quality of life (QOL) outcomes are scarce. We investigated 5-year trajectories in QOL and their associations with weight loss after SG.
A prospective cohort study.
The study was conducted in a single Norwegian bariatric surgery centre.
Out of 150 operated patients, 127 were included. Mean age was 41 years, 68% were women and the follow-up rate at 1 year was 85% and 64% at 1 and 5?years, respectively.
Data were collected preoperatively, and 1 and 5?years after surgery assessing three different levels of QOL. The main exposure was weight loss after SG, assessed as per cent excess body mass index (kg/m2) loss (%EBMIL). The Obesity-Related Problem (OP) scale was used to measure obesity-specific health-related QOL (HRQOL). Physical (PCS) and mental (MCS) composite summary scores of the Short Form 36 Health Survey were used to capture generic HRQOL and Cantril Ladder was used to assess overall QOL.
All HRQOL/overall QOL measures significantly improved at 1?year, followed by modest decline from 1 to 5?years after surgery. Greater %EBMIL 5?years after surgery was significantly associated with improvements in OP and PCS scores, but not with MCS and Cantril Ladder scores. Although significant (p
PubMed ID
31515432 View in PubMed
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Clinical effectiveness of care managers in collaborative care for patients with depression in Swedish primary health care: a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300218
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2018 02 09; 19(1):28
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Pragmatic Clinical Trial
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-09-2018
Author
Cecilia Björkelund
Irene Svenningsson
Dominique Hange
Camilla Udo
Eva-Lisa Petersson
Nashmil Ariai
Shabnam Nejati
Catrin Wessman
Carl Wikberg
Malin André
Lars Wallin
Jeanette Westman
Author Affiliation
Department of Primary Health Care, Institute of Medicine, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. Cecilia.bjorkelund@allmed.gu.se.
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2018 02 09; 19(1):28
Date
02-09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Pragmatic Clinical Trial
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Case Management
Depression - therapy
Depressive Disorder - therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Care Management - organization & administration
Patient Reported Outcome Measures
Patient satisfaction
Primary Health Care
Remission Induction
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Depression is one of the leading causes of disability and affects 10-15% of the population. The majority of people with depressive symptoms seek care and are treated in primary care. Evidence internationally for high quality care supports collaborative care with a care manager. Our aim was to study clinical effectiveness of a care manager intervention in management of primary care patients with depression in Sweden.
In a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial 23 primary care centers (PCCs), urban and rural, included patients aged =?18 years with a new (
PubMed ID
29426288 View in PubMed
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Comparison of agreement between internet-based registration of patient-reported outcomes and clinical-based paper forms within the Swedish Rheumatology Quality Register: comment on the article by Hofstedt et al.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306467
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2020 03; 49(2):169-170
Publication Type
Journal Article
Comment
Date
03-2020
Author
O R Madsen
Author Affiliation
Center for Rheumatology and Spine Diseases, Gentofte University Hospital/Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2020 03; 49(2):169-170
Date
03-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Comment
Keywords
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Humans
Internet
Patient Reported Outcome Measures
Rheumatology
Sweden
Notes
CommentOn: Scand J Rheumatol. 2019 Jul;48(4):326-330 PMID 30758242
CommentIn: Scand J Rheumatol. 2020 Mar;49(2):171-172 PMID 32207393
PubMed ID
32207392 View in PubMed
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Comparison of concomitant injuries and patient-reported outcome in patients that have undergone both primary and revision ACL reconstruction-a national registry study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307358
Source
J Orthop Surg Res. 2020 Jan 10; 15(1):9
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Jan-10-2020
Author
Eleonor Svantesson
Eric Hamrin Senorski
Frida Kristiansson
Eduard Alentorn-Geli
Olof Westin
Kristian Samuelsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedics, Institute of Clinical Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. eleonor.svantesson@outlook.com.
Source
J Orthop Surg Res. 2020 Jan 10; 15(1):9
Date
Jan-10-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction - methods - trends
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Knee Injuries - diagnosis - epidemiology - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Reported Outcome Measures
Registries
Reoperation - methods - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) revision surgery has been associated with inferior outcome compared with primary ACL reconstruction. However, this has rarely been investigated in a consecutive cohort limited to patients that have undergone both primary and revision ACL reconstruction. This study aimed to assess differences in outcome and concomitant injuries between primary and revision ACL reconstruction in such a cohort, and to identify predictors of the patient-reported outcome after ACL revision.
Patients who had undergone both primary and revision ACL reconstruction were identified in the Swedish National Knee Ligament Registry. Patients aged 13-49 years with hamstring tendon primary ACL reconstruction and data on the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) on at least one occasion (preoperative or one year postoperatively) at both surgeries were eligible. Concomitant injuries and the KOOS were compared between each patient's primary and revision ACL reconstruction. Linear regression analyses were performed to determine predictors of the one-year KOOS after ACL revision.
A total of 1014 patients were included. Cartilage injuries increased at ACL revision (p
PubMed ID
31924236 View in PubMed
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Comparison of participants and non-participants in patient-reported outcome surveys: the case of Assessment of Patterns of Patient-Reported Outcomes in Adults with Congenital Heart disease - International Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287400
Source
Cardiol Young. 2017 Apr;27(3):427-434
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Malin C Berghammer
Eva Mattsson
Bengt Johansson
Philip Moons
Mikael Dellborg
Source
Cardiol Young. 2017 Apr;27(3):427-434
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Health status
Heart Defects, Congenital - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Morbidity - trends
Patient Reported Outcome Measures
Quality of Life
Registries
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The last decade has seen a vast increase in the use of patient-reported outcomes. As patient-reported outcomes are used in order to capture patients' perspectives of their health and illness, it is a prerequisite for accurate patient-reported outcome evaluations to use representative samples. In order to evaluate representativeness, the present study focussed on the comparison between participants and non-participants in the Swedish branch of the international study APPROACH-IS (Assessment of Patterns of Patient-Reported Outcomes in Adults with Congenital Heart disease - International Study), regarding demographic, clinical, and health status characteristics.
Eligible patients for APPROACH-IS were identified and selected from SWEDCON, the Swedish registry for congenital heart disease (CHD). Overall, 912 eligible patients were identified, of whom 471 participated, 398 did not participate, and 43 were either unreachable or declined to participate in APPROACH-IS. The participants and non-participants were compared in terms of statistical significance and effect sizes.
Significant differences were observed between participants and non-participants for sex, age, primary diagnosis, number of cardiac operations, and fatigue; however, the effect sizes were in general small, except for the difference in primary diagnosis. No differences between the two groups were found in number of catheterisations, implanted device, the distribution of NYHA functional class, or health status and symptoms.
This study shows that participants and non-participants are relatively comparable groups, which confirms the representativeness of the participants. The Swedish data from APPROACH-IS can therefore be reliably generalised to the population of adults with CHD in Sweden.
PubMed ID
27167242 View in PubMed
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71 records – page 1 of 8.