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A 10-year follow-up study of an adolescent psychiatric clientele and early predictors of readmission.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31747
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2001;55(1):11-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
J. Pedersen
T. Aarkrog
Author Affiliation
Department of Child Psychiatry, Centralsygehuset i Holbaek, Gl. Ringstedvej 1, DK-4300 Holbaek, Denmark.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2001;55(1):11-6
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Affective Disorders, Psychotic - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Borderline Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Recurrence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Schizophrenia, Childhood - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Utilization Review
Abstract
Over a period of 20 years (from 1968 to 1988) all inpatients (n = 839) who were admitted for the first time to the adolescent psychiatric unit in Copenhagen were registered, and 40 social and psychiatric variables were recorded, to investigate early predictors of later readmission. Overall, 44.8% of the patients were readmitted within a certain observation period (range, 1.5-21.5 years). Among a subsample of 488 patients (58%) who could be followed up for more than 10 years after their first admission 26% became heavy users of psychiatric services, defined as long-term inpatients or revolving-door patients. Severe early diagnoses (schizophrenia and affective psychoses) were strongly associated with rapid relapses and frequent readmissions. A statistical estimate of the risk of later heavy use based on 12 independent variables is presented.
PubMed ID
11827601 View in PubMed
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11-year follow-up of mortality in patients with schizophrenia: a population-based cohort study (FIN11 study).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149701
Source
Lancet. 2009 Aug 22;374(9690):620-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-22-2009
Author
Jari Tiihonen
Jouko Lönnqvist
Kristian Wahlbeck
Timo Klaukka
Leo Niskanen
Antti Tanskanen
Jari Haukka
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Psychiatry, University of Kuopio and Niuvanniemi Hospital, Department of Clinical Physiology, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland. jari.tiihonen@niuva.fi
Source
Lancet. 2009 Aug 22;374(9690):620-7
Date
Aug-22-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Antipsychotic Agents - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Cause of Death
Clozapine - adverse effects
Dibenzothiazepines - adverse effects
Drug Utilization - trends
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Perphenazine - adverse effects
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - drug therapy - mortality
Sex Distribution
Time Factors
Abstract
The introduction of second-generation antipsychotic drugs during the 1990s is widely believed to have adversely affected mortality of patients with schizophrenia. Our aim was to establish the long-term contribution of antipsychotic drugs to mortality in such patients.
Nationwide registers in Finland were used to compare the cause-specific mortality in 66 881 patients versus the total population (5.2 million) between 1996, and 2006, and to link these data with the use of antipsychotic drugs. We measured the all-cause mortality of patients with schizophrenia in outpatient care during current and cumulative exposure to any antipsychotic drug versus no use of these drugs, and exposure to the six most frequently used antipsychotic drugs compared with perphenazine use.
Although the proportional use of second-generation antipsychotic drugs rose from 13% to 64% during follow-up, the gap in life expectancy between patients with schizophrenia and the general population did not widen between 1996 (25 years), and 2006 (22.5 years). Compared with current use of perphenazine, the highest risk for overall mortality was recorded for quetiapine (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.41, 95% CI 1.09-1.82), and the lowest risk for clozapine (0.74, 0.60-0.91; p=0.0045 for the difference between clozapine vs perphenazine, and p
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Nov 7;374(9701):1591; author reply 1592-319897117
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Nov 7;374(9701):1591; author reply 1592-319897118
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Aug 22;374(9690):590-219595448
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Nov 7;374(9701):1592; author reply 1592-319897121
Comment In: Lancet. 2009 Nov 7;374(9701):1592; author reply 1592-319897120
PubMed ID
19595447 View in PubMed
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A 22- to 25-year follow-up study of former child psychiatric patients: a register-based investigation of the course of psychiatric disorder and mortality in 546 Danish child psychiatric patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34537
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1996 Dec;94(6):397-403
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
P H Thomsen
Author Affiliation
Research Center, Psychiatric Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Risskov, Denmark.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1996 Dec;94(6):397-403
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cause of Death
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - mortality - therapy
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - mortality - therapy
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Survival Rate
Abstract
A total of 546 children and adolescents, aged 5 to 15 years, who were admitted as in-patients to psychiatric hospitals throughout Denmark between 1970 and 1973, were followed up with regard to later readmissions and mortality. Approximately one-third of the sample had at least one readmission after the age of 18 years; there was no significant difference between male and female subjects. Probands with three selected diagnoses, namely childhood neurosis, conduct disorder and maladjustment reactions, did have a significantly greater general risk of readmission to psychiatric hospital in adulthood than the background population. In total, 24 probands (22 male, and 2 female subjects) died during the study period. Eight subjects had committed suicide. The standard mortality rate was significantly increased.
PubMed ID
9020989 View in PubMed
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Accelerated perioperative care and rehabilitation intervention for hip and knee replacement is effective: a randomized clinical trial involving 87 patients with 3 months of follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86594
Source
Acta Orthop. 2008 Apr;79(2):149-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Larsen Kristian
Sørensen Ole Gade
Hansen Torben B
Thomsen Per B
Søballe Kjeld
Author Affiliation
The Musculoskeletal Research Unit, Department of Orthopedics, Holstebro Regional Hospital, Holstebro, Denmark. fekl2004@msn.com
Source
Acta Orthop. 2008 Apr;79(2):149-59
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - adverse effects - rehabilitation
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - adverse effects - rehabilitation
Early Ambulation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoarthritis, Hip - diagnosis - surgery
Osteoarthritis, Knee - diagnosis - surgery
Patient Readmission
Perioperative Care - methods
Quality of Life
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Approximately 12,000 hip and knee replacements were performed in Denmark in 2005. Accelerated perioperative interventions are currently implemented, but there is conflicting evidence regarding the effect. We therefore performed an efficacy study of an accelerated perioperative care and rehabilitation intervention in patients receiving primary total hip replacement, and both total and unicompartmental knee replacement. METHODS: A randomized clinical trial was undertaken in which 87 patients were randomized to either a control group receiving the current perioperative procedure, or an intervention group receiving a new accelerated perioperative care and rehabilitation procedure. Outcome measures were length of stay (LOS) in hospital, and gain in quality of life (QOL) using EQ-5D from baseline to 3-month follow-up. RESULTS: Mean LOS was reduced (p
PubMed ID
18478482 View in PubMed
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[A comparison of the pattern of readmissions of long-term/geriatric patients and internal medicine patients].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223564
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 Jun 29;154(27):1901-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-29-1992
Author
K. Vennervald
Author Affiliation
Københavns Amts Sygehus i Glostrup, medicinsk afdeling C.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1992 Jun 29;154(27):1901-6
Date
Jun-29-1992
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Denmark
Female
Geriatrics - statistics & numerical data
Hospital Departments - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Internal Medicine - statistics & numerical data
Long-Term Care
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A comparison was undertaken between the frequencies of admission of medical patients over the age of 64 years and long-term/geriatric patients admitted to a large county hospital. The pattern of readmission is described in relation to the age groups and sex. The period of observation was nine months. In the investigation, the relationship between the distribution of men and women in the normal population was taken into consideration and a correction factor was calculated. A total of loll patients (CP) discharged from an acute medical department (AM) had 1954 readmissions (GI). In the long-term medical department (LMA) 158 CP had a total of 328-GI. The number of CP readmitted in each age group and sex reflects the representation of the group concerned in the background population, although a tendency was observed for slightly more admissions, the older the CP were. No difference in the pattern of readmission was observed concerning CP readmitted from AM and readmitted to all departments including AM. Similarly, despite some scatter, there was no difference in the GI pattern in CP discharged from LMA and readmitted to all departments including LMA. In addition, no significant difference in the GI pattern was observed as compared with the AM patient group and the LMA patient group. As patients referred to LMA have, quite naturally, poorer performance than the patients who were discharged directly from medical or surgical departments, it may be concluded that, after treatment in LMA, no difference between the patient groups was found if the GI frequency was taken as a yardstick. As GI, just as other measurements of turnover, only provides an expression of the status at a given moment, the author considers that it is of importance both for the departmental and the political planning that the GI frequency is followed as part of the current assessment.
PubMed ID
1509549 View in PubMed
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Acute admissions to a community hospital - health consequences: a randomized controlled trial in Hallingdal, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267407
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2014;15:198
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Øystein Lappegard
Per Hjortdahl
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2014;15:198
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Home Nursing - utilization
Hospitalization
Hospitals, Community
Hospitals, General
Humans
Length of Stay
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Nursing Homes - utilization
Patient Outcome Assessment
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Health care professionals in several countries are searching for alternatives to acute hospitalization. In Hallingdal, Norway, selected acute patients are admitted to a community hospital. The aim of this study was to analyse whether acute admission to a community hospital as an alternative to a general hospital had any positive or negative health consequences for the patients.
Patients intended for acute admission to the local community hospital were asked to join a randomized controlled trial. One group of the enrolled patients was admitted as planned (group 1, n = 33), while another group was admitted to the general hospital (group 2, n = 27). Health outcomes were measured by the Nottingham Extended Activity of Daily Living Questionnaire and by collection of data concerning specialist and community health care services in a follow-up year.
After one year, no statistical significant differences in the level of daily function was found between group 1 (admissions to the community hospital) and group 2 (admissions to the general hospital). Group 1 had recorded fewer in-patient days at hospitals and nursing homes, as well as lower use of home nursing, than group 2. For outpatient referrals, the trend was the opposite. However, the differences between the two groups were not at a 5% level of statistical significance.
No statistical significant differences at a 5% level were found related to health consequences between the two randomized groups. The study however, indicates a consistent trend of health benefits rather than risk from acute admissions to a community hospital, as compared to the general hospital. Emergency admission and treatment at a lower-level facility than the hospital thus appears to be a feasible solution for a selected group of patients.
ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01069107 . Registered 2 April 2010.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25491726 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jul;24 Suppl B:6B-8B
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Serge Lepage
Author Affiliation
Cardiology Division, Faculty of Medicine, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec. serge.lepage@USherbrooke.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jul;24 Suppl B:6B-8B
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Cardiotonic Agents - therapeutic use
Diuretics - therapeutic use
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Heart Failure - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Hospital Costs
Hospitalization - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain - therapeutic use
Patient Readmission - economics - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Survival Analysis
Abstract
Acute decompensated heart failure is the most common cause of hospitalization for patients older than 65 years of age. Although treatment of this condition has improved over the past two decades, the specific approach to patients in the acute setting has not evolved in the same way. A patient facing acute decompensation is experiencing a serious medical condition that is associated with a poor prognosis. In addition, acute decompensated heart failure results in significant costs to the health care system. Significant morbidity and mortality are associated with patients who are readmitted within a year of the first hospitalization. Because of this important problem, further research on improving the prognosis for this condition is warranted. The present article will focus on the risk factors associated with acute decompensation and the importance of this condition, both on prognosis and economics.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18629381 View in PubMed
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Acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: influence of social factors in determining length of hospital stay and readmission rates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154563
Source
Can Respir J. 2008 Oct;15(7):361-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Alyson W M Wong
Wen Q Gan
Jane Burns
Don D Sin
Sephan F van Eeden
Author Affiliation
The James iCAPTURE Centre for Cardiovascular and pulmonary Research, Heart and Lung Institute, St Paul's Hospital, Providence Healthcare, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Can Respir J. 2008 Oct;15(7):361-4
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Marital Status - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Prognosis
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - diagnosis - epidemiology
Recurrence
Respiratory Function Tests
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) is the leading reason for hospitalization in Canada and a significant financial burden on hospital resources. Identifying factors that influence the time a patient spends in the hospital and readmission rates will allow for better use of scarce hospital resources.
To determine the factors that influence length of stay (LOS) in the hospital and readmission for patients with AECOPD in an inner-city hospital.
Using the Providence Health Records, a retrospective review of patients admitted to St Paul's Hospital (Vancouver, British Columbia) during the winter of 2006 to 2007 (six months) with a diagnosis of AECOPD, was conducted. Exacerbations were classified according to Anthonisen criteria to determine the severity of exacerbation on admission. Severity of COPD was scored using the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria. For comparative analysis, severity of disease (GOLD criteria), age, sex and smoking history were matched.
Of 109 admissions reviewed, 66 were single admissions (61%) and 43 were readmissions (39%). The number of readmissions ranged from two to nine (mean of 3.3 readmissions). More than 85% of admissions had the severity of COPD equal to or greater than GOLD stage 3. The significant indicators for readmission were GOLD status (P
Notes
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Comment In: Can Respir J. 2008 Oct;15(7):343-419069593
PubMed ID
18949105 View in PubMed
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Acute myocardial infarction in Alberta: temporal changes in outcomes, 1994 to 1999.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181191
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Feb;20(2):213-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Hude Quan
Bibiana Cujec
Yan Jin
David Johnson
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Centre for Health and Policy Studies, University of Calgary, Quality Improvement and Health Information, Calgary Health Region, Alberta. hquan@ucalgary.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Feb;20(2):213-9
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta - epidemiology
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Bypass
Female
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Incidence
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Patient Readmission
Predictive value of tests
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Analysis
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The current survival trends in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) are not known. A population-based study using administrative data to examine the short and long term survival of patients after AMI in Alberta between 1994 and 1999 was conducted.
AMI patients were identified from hospital discharge data. Temporal changes in the adjusted (age, sex, AMI anatomical location and comorbidities) fatality rate were analyzed in 19,928 AMI patients.
The age- and sex-adjusted incidence of hospitalization for AMI in Alberta significantly declined from 169.6 per 100,000 population in 1994 to 160.8 per 100,000 in 1999 (P=0.03). The risk-adjusted in-hospital case fatality rate from all causes was 11.4% (95% CI 10.6% to 12.3%) in 1994 versus 9.2% (8.4% to 10.1%) in 1999; the 30-day case fatality rate was 12.6% (11.7% to 13.6%) in 1994 versus 10.1% (9.1% to 11.0%) in 1999; and the one-year case fatality rate was 19.0% (17.8% to 20.1%) in 1994 versus 14.9% (13.8% to 16.0%) in 1999. The percentage of hospitalized AMI patients who underwent coronary angiography within one year after admission rose from 48.2% in 1994 to 52.4% in 1999; percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty increased from 25.5% to 35.0% and coronary artery bypass surgery increased from 9.7% to 12.6%. Prescriptions for pharmacological drugs at discharge increased from 1994 to 1999 among patients aged 65 and older: from 29.5% in 1994 to 41.0% in 1999 for beta-blockers, from 5.2% to 18.7% for lipid lowering agents and from 14.0% to 20.5% for angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors.
There was a modest improvement in patient survival after AMI between 1994 and 1999. The improvements may be associated with increasing use of revascularization and pharmacological therapy provided in the management of AMI.
PubMed ID
15010746 View in PubMed
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[Admission pattern at a department of internal medicine. Factors of significance for readmission within three months after discharge]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72578
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Apr 13;160(16):2396-400
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-13-1998
Author
S B Christensen
T. Gjørup
Author Affiliation
Medicinsk afdeling, Sundby Hospital.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1998 Apr 13;160(16):2396-400
Date
Apr-13-1998
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Denmark
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Internal Medicine - statistics & numerical data
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Admission
Patient Discharge
Patient Readmission
Registries
Abstract
The aim of the study was to investigate factors of significance for readmission of patients in a department of internal medicine. The study was based on hospital computerized data files. All admissions from the 1st of January to the 31st of December 1995 were included. During that period the department had 6061 admissions of 4152 patients. The readmission rate was 1.46. All patients were followed three months after discharge. Within that period 1119 (27%) of the patients were readmitted. A high frequency of readmission was especially found within the first ten days after discharge. Length of stay in hospital did not influence readmission rate. Women, patients in the age group 71-90 years and patients with chronic diseases were more likely to be readmitted. The demonstrated factors relating to a high readmission rate are difficult to influence. A prospective study including the primary health care system and a clinical evaluation of the patients is needed to examine causes of the high number of readmission within the first ten days after discharge.
PubMed ID
9571814 View in PubMed
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669 records – page 1 of 67.