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[About shared decision making and other related words].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262098
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2015 Jan 27;135(2):149
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-27-2015
Author
Magne Nylenna
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2015 Jan 27;135(2):149
Date
Jan-27-2015
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Making
Humans
Norway
Patient Participation
Terminology as Topic
PubMed ID
25625995 View in PubMed
Less detail

Access to health care for economically disadvantaged Canadians: a model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228053
Source
Can J Public Health. 1990 Nov-Dec;81(6):450-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
M J Stewart
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1990 Nov-Dec;81(6):450-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Health Behavior
Health education
Health Services Accessibility - standards
Health status
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Patient Participation
Poverty
Abstract
In Canada, cultural, physical and structural barriers to the poor's accessibility to health care persist. The economically disadvantaged are clearly identified as a national high-risk target group because of poorer health status and health behaviours than higher-income Canadians. A four-component model is proposed to describe the complex, multivariate nature of access to health care for the economically disadvantaged. The mutual effects of characteristics of access and poverty are outlined and strategies to facilitate improved access are delineated and exemplified. Education, comprehensive and personalized care, consumer participation, and environmental strategies, while not uniquely applicable to the needs of the poor, may collectively constitute a reasonable approach to removing barriers to access to care for this vulnerable group. Furthermore, these four strategies are consistent with premises of primary health care and health promotion. While the model encompasses many relevant variables, it is neither exclusive nor all-inclusive. Further research is required to assess the linkage between specific elements of these four components and to conduct monetary and human cost-benefit analyses of recommended approaches.
PubMed ID
2282608 View in PubMed
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Achieving cardiovascular health through continuing interprofessional development.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190531
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Jul-Aug;92(4):I10-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
D M Kaufman
J. McClaran
M. Toombs
S. Beardall
I. Levy
A. Chockalingam
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Jul-Aug;92(4):I10-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Behavior Therapy - education
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Education, Medical, Continuing
Health Behavior
Health Care Coalitions
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Life Style
Patient care team
Patient Participation
Public Health
Abstract
In order to achieve cardiovascular health for all Canadians, the ACHIC (Achieving Cardiovascular Health in Canada) partnership advocates that health promotion for healthy lifestyles be incorporated into practice, and that the consistent messages and professional skills required to motivate patients and the public be acquired through interprofessional education and development. Professional education specialists are essential members of health care promotion teams with expertise to develop educational interventions that impact behaviours of health professionals and subsequent patient outcomes. Continuing medical education (CME) is in evolution to continuing professional development (CPD), and then to continuing inter-professional development (CID). Providers of health promotion, public health, and health care can work with health educators to complete the cascade of learning, change in practice, and improvement in patient outcomes. The Canadian health care system can empower Canadians to achieve cardiovascular health, the most important health challenge in the 21st century.
PubMed ID
11962121 View in PubMed
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Achieving therapeutic clarity in assisted personal body care: professional challenges in interactions with severely ill COPD patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155622
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 Aug;17(16):2155-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Kirsten Lomborg
Marit Kirkevold
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, Institute of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. kl@nursingscience.au.dk
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 Aug;17(16):2155-63
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Baths - nursing - psychology
Clinical Competence
Communication
Denmark
Dyspnea - etiology
Helping Behavior
Hospitals, University
Humans
Middle Aged
Negotiating - psychology
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - organization & administration - psychology
Patient Care Planning - organization & administration
Patient Participation - methods - psychology
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - nursing - psychology
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
This paper aims to present a theoretical account of professional nursing challenges involved in providing care to patients suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The study objectives are patients' and nurses' expectations, goals and approaches to assisted personal body care.
The provision of help with body care may have therapeutic qualities but there is only limited knowledge about the particularities and variations in specific groups of patients and the nurse-patient interactions required to facilitate patient functioning and well-being. For patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, breathlessness represents a particular challenge in the performance of body care sessions.
We investigated nurse-patient interactions during assisted personal body care, using grounded theory with a symbolic interaction perspective and a constant comparative method.
Twelve cases of nurse-patient interactions were analysed. Data were based on participant observation, individual interviews with patients and nurses and a standardized questionnaire on patients' breathlessness.
Nurses and patients seemed to put effort into the interaction and wanted to find an appropriate way of conducting the body care session according to the patients' specific needs. Achieving therapeutic clarity in nurse-patient interactions appeared to be an important concern, mainly depending on interactions characterized by: (i) reaching a common understanding of the patient's current conditions and stage of illness trajectory, (ii) negotiating a common scope and structuring body care sessions and (iii) clarifying roles.
It cannot be taken for granted that therapeutic qualities are achieved when nurses provide assistance with body care. If body care should have healing strength, the actual body care activities and the achievement of therapeutic clarity in nurses' interaction with patients' appear to be crucial.
The paper proposes that patients' integrity and comfort in the body care session should be given first priority and raises attention to details that nurses should take into account when assisting severely ill patients.
PubMed ID
18710375 View in PubMed
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Adaptation, data quality and confirmatory factor analysis of the Danish version of the PACIC questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138823
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2012 Feb;22(1):31-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Helle Terkildsen Maindal
Ineta Sokolowski
Peter Vedsted
Author Affiliation
Section of General Practice, School of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. htm@alm.au.dk
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2012 Feb;22(1):31-6
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Diabetes mellitus, type 2 - therapy
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Participation
Patient satisfaction
Psychometrics
Quality of Health Care
Questionnaires - standards
Abstract
The Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC) 20-item questionnaire measures how chronic care patients perceive their involvement in care. We aimed to adapt the measure into Danish and to assess data quality, internal consistency and the proposed factorial structure.
The PACIC was translated by a standardised forward-backward procedure, and filled in by 560 patients receiving type 2 diabetes care. Data quality was assessed by mean, median, item response, missing values, floor and ceiling effects, internal consistency (Cronbach's a and average inter-item correlation), item-rest correlations and factorial structure was assessed by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA).
The item response was high (missing answers: 0.5-2.9%). Floor effect was 2.7-69.2%, above 15% for 17 items. Ceiling effect was 4.0-40.4%, above 15% for 12 items. The subscales had average inter-item correlations over 0.30 and CFA showed high factor loadings (range 0.67-0.77). All had a over 0.7 and included items with both high and low loadings. The CFA model fit was good for two indices out of six (TLI and SRMR).
Danish PACIC is now available and validated in primary care in a type 2 diabetes population. The psychometric properties were satisfactory apart from ceiling and floor effects. We endorse the proposed five scale structure. All the subscales showed good model fit, and may be used for separate sum scores.
PubMed ID
21134901 View in PubMed
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Adapting an Australian question prompt list in oncology to a Norwegian setting-a combined method approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286916
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2017 Jan;25(1):51-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Anita Amundsen
Bente Ervik
Phyllis Butow
Martin H N Tattersall
Svein Bergvik
Tore Sørlie
Tone Nordøy
Source
Support Care Cancer. 2017 Jan;25(1):51-58
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Australia
Communication
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Medical Oncology - standards
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient Participation
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
A question prompt list (QPL) is an inexpensive communication aid that has been proved effective in encouraging patients to ask questions during medical consultations. The aim of this project was to develop a QPL for Norwegian cancer patients.
A multimethod approach was chosen combining literature review, focus groups, and a survey in the process of culturally adjusting an Australian QPL for the Norwegian setting. Participants were recruited from the University Hospital of North Norway. They were asked to review and comment on iterative drafts of the QPL.
Eighteen patients, mean age 54, participated in the focus groups, and 31 patients, mean age 55, participated in the survey. Focus groups suggested that topics related to accompanying relatives, children as next of kin, and rehabilitation were important and should be added to the original QPL. The survey revealed that most questions from the original QPL were considered both useful and understandable. Although half of the patients found some questions about prognosis unpleasant, the vast majority considered the same questions useful. Questions regarding clinical studies, multidisciplinary teams, and public versus private hospitals had lower ratings of usefulness.
QPLs require some adjustment to the local cultural context, and a mixed method approach may provide a useful model for future cultural adaptation of QPLs. The present QPL has been adjusted to the needs of oncology patients in the Norwegian health care setting.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27539133 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adding women's voices to the call for sustainable rural maternity care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176939
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2004;9(4):239-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Rebecca Sutherns
Author Affiliation
McMaster University Health Studies Programme, Hamilton, Ont.
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2004;9(4):239-44
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Continuity of Patient Care
Female
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Maternal Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Patient Participation
Pregnancy
Professional-Patient Relations
Program Evaluation
Rural Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Women's health
Abstract
The shortage of maternity care providers in Canada has been documented largely from the perspective of physicians. Women in rural communities, however, have much to contribute to this discussion. Exploratory research in 3 rural communities in south central Ontario eliciting the perspectives of 36 birthing women has affirmed the need for integrated models of maternity care. Rural women seek care that is local and "relational," characterized by time spent with care providers, continuity and personalized care. They also seek care that is based on fully informed choice. Collaborative models of care, including rural physicians, nurses and midwives, have the potential to create the sustainability and collegiality required to achieve these qualities.
PubMed ID
15603695 View in PubMed
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Adjusting for selective non-participation with re-contact data in the FINRISK 2012 survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296112
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2018 Nov; 46(7):758-766
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2018
Author
Juho Kopra
Tommi Härkänen
Hanna Tolonen
Pekka Jousilahti
Kari Kuulasmaa
Jaakko Reinikainen
Juha Karvanen
Author Affiliation
1 Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Jyvaskyla, Finland.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2018 Nov; 46(7):758-766
Date
Nov-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Surveys - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Participation - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Selection Bias
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
A common objective of epidemiological surveys is to provide population-level estimates of health indicators. Survey results tend to be biased under selective non-participation. One approach to bias reduction is to collect information about non-participants by contacting them again and asking them to fill in a questionnaire. This information is called re-contact data, and it allows to adjust the estimates for non-participation.
We analyse data from the FINRISK 2012 survey, where re-contact data were collected. We assume that the respondents of the re-contact survey are similar to the remaining non-participants with respect to the health given their available background information. Validity of this assumption is evaluated based on the hospitalisation data obtained through record linkage of survey data to the administrative registers. Using this assumption and multiple imputation, we estimate the prevalences of daily smoking and heavy alcohol consumption and compare them to estimates obtained with a commonly used assumption that the participants represent the entire target group.
When adjusting for non-participation using re-contact data, higher prevalence estimates were observed compared to prevalence estimates based on participants only. Among men, the smoking prevalence estimate was 28.5% (23.2% for participants) and heavy alcohol consumption prevalence was 9.4% (6.8% for participants). Among women, smoking prevalence was 19% (16.5% for participants) and heavy alcohol consumption was 4.8% (3% for participants).
The utilisation of re-contact data is a useful method to adjust for non-participation bias on population estimates in epidemiological surveys.
PubMed ID
29072108 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adolescent and young adult cancer survivors' perceptions of participating in a survey - Ethical and methodological considerations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299702
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2019 Apr; 39:55-61
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2019
Author
Maria Olsson
Gunnar Steineck
Karin Enskär
Ulrica Wilderäng
Marianne Jarfelt
Author Affiliation
Institute of Clinical Sciences, Department of Paediatrics, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, S-416 85, Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: maria.a.olsson@vgregion.se.
Source
Eur J Oncol Nurs. 2019 Apr; 39:55-61
Date
Apr-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cancer Survivors - psychology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Patient Participation - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to understand patient-reported perception of participation in a population-based web-survey focusing on sensitive issues for adolescent and young adult cancer survivors.
A population-based web survey for adolescent and young adult cancer survivors including a matched control group. Adolescent and young adult cancer survivors from the population-based Swedish National Cancer Registry from four of the six register holders at Regional Cancer Centers in Sweden. Controls were randomly identified from the Swedish National Population registry, from the same register holders.
Of 729 eligible participants, 540 completed the survey i.e. 74% participation rate. The study population included 285 adolescent and young adult cancer survivors and 255 matched controls. None of the participants answered that the survey had a very negative impact on them and a minority of 43 (7.9%) of the 540 responded that they were mildly negatively affected by their participation in the study. There was a no significant difference between patients and controls regarding the negative effect of the participation (p?=?0.29). Positive experiences of participating in the study were widely expressed and most participants (95%) found the study valuable.
These findings suggest that the benefits clearly outweigh the risks when adolescent and young adult cancer survivors participate in surveys including sensitive and trauma-related aspects, given that the study design is ethically sound and participants are approached carefully. We also present a modified ethical protocol for epidemiological surveys on adolescents and young adult cancer survivors.
PubMed ID
30850139 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' experiences of a two-year oral health intervention programme in two Swedish secondary schools.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113112
Source
Int J Dent Hyg. 2013 Nov;11(4):244-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
E. Hedman
P. Gabre
D. Birkhed
M. Lepp
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Dentisty, Public Dental Health, Uppsala County Council, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Cariology, Institute of Odontology, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Int J Dent Hyg. 2013 Nov;11(4):244-52
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude to Health
Cariostatic Agents - therapeutic use
Communication
Dental Hygienists
Dental Prophylaxis
Female
Fluorides, Topical - therapeutic use
Focus Groups
Health Education, Dental
Humans
Intervention Studies
Interviews as Topic
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Oral Health
Patient Participation
Peer Group
Personal Satisfaction
Professional-Patient Relations
School Dentistry
Self Concept
Sweden
Time Factors
Trust
Abstract
To describe adolescents' experiences of participating in a school-based oral health intervention programme for 2 years containing education about oral health and fluoride varnish treatment at the school clinic.
Sixteen adolescents aged 13-16 were interviewed in three focus group sessions. A phenomenographic approach was used for analysis.
The results are presented as three themes and seven descriptive categories. The three themes were 'Seeing the dental hygienist', 'Treatments at the dental hygiene clinic' and 'Education about oral health in class'. The results demonstrate satisfaction with the intervention, such as accessibility, time gain and expanding knowledge. On the other hand, feelings of vulnerability in the treatment sessions were expressed. The fluoride varnish treatment was given both positive and negative reviews. The contact between the participants and the dental hygienist was important, and the opportunity to ask questions about oral health issues was emphasized.
Both positive and negative experiences of the programme were found. Adolescence is a transitional period of life, and for this reason, it is important to create a good working alliance between students and the dental hygienist in future school-based oral health interventions.
PubMed ID
23763634 View in PubMed
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1119 records – page 1 of 112.