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166 records – page 1 of 17.

[10 years with HIV/AIDS. New dimensions in old ethical problems. Abolish compulsory testing, impose time-limit on isolation]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8159
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Jul 8;89(28-29):2458-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-8-1992
Author
O. Berglund
Author Affiliation
Infektionskliniken, Huddinge sjukhus.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Jul 8;89(28-29):2458-60
Date
Jul-8-1992
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
AIDS Serodiagnosis - psychology
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - diagnosis - prevention & control - psychology
Adult
Ethics, Medical
HIV Seropositivity - diagnosis - psychology
Humans
Legislation, Medical
Male
Patient Isolation - psychology
Sweden
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 1993 Sep 8;90(36):29498366718
PubMed ID
1507968 View in PubMed
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Adulthood mortality of infants isolated at birth due to tuberculosis in the family.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31077
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2003;31(1):69-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Juha M Veijola
Pirjo H Mäki
Matti I Joukamaa
Esa Läärä
Helinä Hakko
Markku M Nieminen
Matti K Isohanni
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu, Finland. jveijola@cc.oulu.fi
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2003;31(1):69-72
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
BCG Vaccine - administration & dosage
Cause of Death
Child Custody
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Family Health
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Nurseries
Patient Isolation
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tuberculosis - prevention & control
Abstract
AIMS: In 1936 the Finnish Anti-Tuberculosis Association founded the first nursery, "Joulumerkkikoti", into which infants born into tuberculous families were admitted and given BCG vaccination to reduce the risk of tuberculosis. This prophylactic regimen was effective in reducing infant mortality and morbidity of tuberculosis. We investigated the mortality of these children later in childhood and adulthood. METHODS: The index cohort consisted of 3,020 subjects born between 1945 and 1965 in Finland and isolated from their family immediately after birth. The average separation time was 218 days. The subjects alive on 1 January 1971 were identified. For every index subject two reference subjects were chosen, the matching criteria being sex, year, and place of birth. Data on causes of deaths were obtained from the Finnish Cause of Death Registry by the end of 1998. RESULTS: The relative mortality rate (RR) was higher in the index cohort than in the reference cohort for all causes of death (RR 1.4; 95% CI 1.2-1.7), and particularly for unnatural deaths: RR 1.5 (1.1-1.9) for men and RR 1.9 (1.0-3.7) for women. CONCLUSIONS: The mortality in the index subjects later in childhood and adulthood was somewhat elevated. This may be explained by a variety of risks experienced during pregnancy, delivery, and childhood. The fall in the socioeconomic status of the family of origin due to tuberculosis may partially explain the result. Another interpretation is that the very early separation from the mother had unfavourable effects on later psychological developments in some children.
PubMed ID
12623528 View in PubMed
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An epidemic spread of multiresistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a cystic fibrosis centre.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39259
Source
J Antimicrob Chemother. 1986 Apr;17(4):505-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1986
Author
S S Pedersen
C. Koch
N. Høiby
K. Rosendal
Source
J Antimicrob Chemother. 1986 Apr;17(4):505-16
Date
Apr-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross Infection - drug therapy - epidemiology
Cystic Fibrosis - complications
Denmark
Disease Outbreaks
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Female
Humans
Lactams
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Patient Isolation
Pseudomonas Infections - drug therapy - epidemiology
Pseudomonas aeruginosa - drug effects
Tobramycin - therapeutic use
Abstract
Early in 1983 an epidemic of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa resistant to aminoglycosides, carbenicillin, ureidopenicillins, ceftazidime, cefsulodin and imipenem occurred in a cystic fibrosis centre. Most of the epidemic could be attributed to a specific nosocomial strain by means of O-grouping and phage-typing. This strain was present in the centre at a low frequency in 1973 and developed resistance during courses of chemotherapy. The epidemic was stopped by isolating patients with the resistant strains. Restrictive and selective use of antibiotics have not been sufficient to eradicate the resistant strains, which persist in 42% of the patients. The extensive use of the third generation cephalosporins in the clinic is probably responsible for inducing and selecting for the resistant strains. Clustering of patients in the centre has facilitated the spread. First-line use of older beta-lactam antibiotics, close bacteriological monitoring and prompt isolation of patients with resistant strains are recommended.
PubMed ID
3086274 View in PubMed
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[An outbreak of MRSA in a nursing home in Oslo].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153688
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2008 Dec 4;128(23):2734-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-4-2008
Author
Hans Frederik Leendert van der Werff
Tore Waelgaard Steen
Kirsten Marie Knutsen Garder
Bjørg Marit Andersen
Mette Rasch
Bente Jørgen
Anne Bråthen
Merete Helland
Lina Torvund
Aslak Heldal Haugen
Author Affiliation
Hovseterhjemmet Landingsveien 12 0767 Oslo. hlfvanderwerff@hotmail.com
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2008 Dec 4;128(23):2734-7
Date
Dec-4-2008
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Carrier State - microbiology
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Humans
Infection Control
Male
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus - isolation & purification
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Nursing Homes
Patient Isolation
Risk factors
Staphylococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Abstract
Infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) represent an increasing problem in Norway, also in nursing homes and other institutions for long-term care. We describe an outbreak of MRSA in a nursing home in Oslo 2004-5.
The nursing home has six wards with 185 beds. The building is old, all rooms have toilets and sinks, but showers are shared. Standard screening procedures were carried out according to the national MRSA guide and by using the nursing home's infection control programme. Later on we used more extensive screening of staff and patients.
The outbreak started in a ward for short-term care, but spread to a ward for patients with dementia after some months. Ten patients, seven staff members and two relatives of infected persons were diagnosed with MRSA. All bacteria probably belonged to the same strain. Four staff members and five patients who were infected had pre-existing wounds or eczema. The nursing home was declared free of MRSA 20 months after the outbreak started, but one member of staff remained a carrier for two years, and one patient became a chronic carrier of MRSA. During the first six months, infected patients were restricted to their rooms, and standard eradication procedures were carried out for five days. Later on, we introduced cohort isolation for infected, exposed and recently treated patients, a different screening routine, a prolonged eradication procedure, restrictions on staff working elsewhere and more stringent precautions for visitors.
An old building and insufficient isolation procedures during the first phase of the outbreak contributed to spreading MRSA and prolonging the outbreak. Cohort isolation seemed to be the most important measure to control the outbreak. All nursing homes should have a designated single patient room for contact precautions. Long-term carriers of MRSA in nursing homes represent a big challenge.
PubMed ID
19079422 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in a hematology-oncology unit: control by patient cohorting and terminal cleaning of the environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188914
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2002 Aug;23(8):468-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2002
Author
Mary Lu Sample
Denise Gravel
Cathy Oxley
Baldwin Toye
Gary Garber
Karam Ramotar
Author Affiliation
Infection Control, The Ottawa Hospital, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2002 Aug;23(8):468-70
Date
Aug-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross Infection - epidemiology - prevention & control
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Disinfection - methods
Enterococcus
Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Infection Control - methods
Male
Oncology Service, Hospital
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Isolation
Vancomycin Resistance
Abstract
We describe the impact of enhanced infection control interventions on controlling the spread of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in our hematology-oncology unit. Between April and September 1998, 13 patients on this unit were identified as having VRE. In addition to contact precautions, other measures that were needed to control the outbreak included closure of the unit to new admissions, creation of a cohort of VRE-positive patients and staff, and thorough cleaning of patients' rooms with 0.5% sodium hypochlorite.
PubMed ID
12186215 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Sep 30;118(23):3582
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-30-1998
Author
P. Aavitsland
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Sep 30;118(23):3582
Date
Sep-30-1998
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
History, Medieval
History, Modern 1601-
Humans
Norway
Patient Isolation
Quarantine - history - legislation & jurisprudence
PubMed ID
9819998 View in PubMed
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[Aseptic unit for treatment of patients with acute leukemia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249592
Source
Sov Med. 1977 Sep;(9):127-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1977

Assessment of the effectiveness of body substance precautions as the infection control system of a large teaching hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219782
Source
Am J Infect Control. 1993 Dec;21(6):302-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993
Author
I B Duncan
C. Batchelor
Author Affiliation
Microbiology Department, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Infect Control. 1993 Dec;21(6):302-9
Date
Dec-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Fluids
Cross Infection - epidemiology - microbiology - prevention & control
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Hospital Bed Capacity, 500 and over
Hospitals, Teaching
Humans
Incidence
Infection control - methods - standards
Long-Term Care
Ontario
Patient Isolation
Program Evaluation
Universal Precautions
Abstract
Body substance precautions was the name given to the body substance isolation-based infection control system that was introduced in January 1990 at a Canadian university hospital with 650 acute care beds and 570 long-term care beds. When the body substance precautions system was begun, traditional category-specific isolation was discontinued.
After 2 years, we reviewed the incidence of several types of nosocomial infections and the frequency of isolation of hospital strains of bacteria before and after the introduction of body substance precautions to find out whether this system was as effective as the previous system of infection control.
Most nosocomial infections did not increase. There was another likely cause for the only one that did. For many years, we had isolated patients infected or colonized by hospital bacteria, limiting their spread throughout the institution. Body substance precautions proved equally effective in doing this.
Our results to date therefore indicate that the body substance precautions system was as successful as category-specific isolation used with other standard infection control techniques in maintaining low rates of nosocomial infections and in controlling the dissemination of hospital strains of bacteria in our institution. Body substance precautions provided a satisfactory alternative to universal precautions and traditional isolation categories for the protection of health care workers against the risk of infection by blood-borne viruses.
PubMed ID
8122802 View in PubMed
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166 records – page 1 of 17.