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Cancer education, prevention and early detection in indigenous population in the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, Oaxaca, Mexico: The Cancer Prevention and Research Center (CEPREC) Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180108
Source
Onkologie. 2004 Apr;27(2):211
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004

The effects of Internet or interactive computer-based patient education in the field of breast cancer: a systematic literature review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148620
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2010 Apr;79(1):5-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Anne M Ryhänen
Mervi Siekkinen
Sirkku Rankinen
Heikki Korvenranta
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku and Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland. amryha@utu.fi
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2010 Apr;79(1):5-13
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms
Breast Neoplasms, Male
Computer-Assisted Instruction
Female
Finland
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Internet
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Patient Education as Topic - methods - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this systematic review was to analyze what kind of Internet or interactive computer-based patient education programs have been developed and to analyze the effectiveness of these programs in the field of breast cancer patient education. Patient education for breast cancer patients is an important intervention to empower the patient. However, we know very little about the effects and potential of Internet-based patient education in the empowerment of breast cancer patients.
Complete databases were searched covering the period from the beginning of each database to November 2008. Studies were included if they concerned patient education for breast cancer patients with Internet or interactive computer programs and were based on randomized controlled, on clinical trials or quasi-experimental studies.
We identified 14 articles involving 2374 participants. The design was randomized controlled trial in nine papers, in two papers clinical trial and in three quasi-experimental. Seven of the studies were randomized to experimental and control groups, in two papers participants were grouped by ethnic and racial differences and by mode of Internet use and three studies measured the same group pre- and post-tests after using a computer program. The interventions used were described as interactive computer or multimedia programs and use of the Internet. The methodological solutions of the studies varied. The effects of the studies were diverse except for knowledge-related issues. Internet or interactive computer-based patient education programs in the care of breast cancer patients may have positive effect increasing breast cancer knowledge.
The results suggest a positive relationship between the Internet or computer-based patient education program use and the knowledge level of patients with breast cancer but a diverse relationship between patient's participation and other outcome measures.
There is need to develop and research more Internet-based patient education.
PubMed ID
19744817 View in PubMed
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Inhaler education for hospital-based pharmacists: how much is required?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201631
Source
Can Respir J. 1999 May-Jun;6(3):237-44
Publication Type
Article
Author
C A Jackevicius
K R Chapman
Author Affiliation
The Toronto Hospital and Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. t19nspm@torhosp.toronto.on.ca
Source
Can Respir J. 1999 May-Jun;6(3):237-44
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Adult
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - administration & dosage
Asthma - drug therapy
Canada
Education, Pharmacy, Continuing - methods - organization & administration - standards
Educational Measurement
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Inservice Training - methods - organization & administration - standards
Male
Middle Aged
Nebulizers and Vaporizers
Patient Education as Topic - methods - organization & administration
Pharmacy Service, Hospital
Sampling Studies
Teaching - methods
Abstract
To compare the effectiveness of a more intensive educational intervention with a less intensive intervention on the ability of hospital pharmacists to be prepared to educate patients regarding inhaled device technique.
Randomized controlled trial. Inhaler technique and knowledge were assessed pre-education, immediately after and three months after education by a research assistant blinded to the educational allocation.
Tertiary hospital pharmacy department.
Hospital-based pharmacists.
A 1 h 'hands-on' session with feedback (more intense education, MIE) or written materials describing inhaler use (less intense education, LIE).
The change in overall score from pre-education to early posteducation for MIE was greater than for LIE (mean [95% CI]) (2.64 [1.27 to 4.01] versus 1.26 [0.05 to 2.47], P
PubMed ID
10393285 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Parental participation in the prevention and correction of disorders and diseases of the musculoskeletal system in schoolchildren].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123291
Source
Gig Sanit. 2012 Jan-Feb;(1):59-64
Publication Type
Article
Author
N B Mirskaia
A V Liakhovich
A N Kolomenskaia
A D Siniakina
Source
Gig Sanit. 2012 Jan-Feb;(1):59-64
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Literacy - methods - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Moscow
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Parents
Patient Education as Topic - methods - organization & administration
Patient Participation - methods
Questionnaires
Students
Abstract
The fact that parents are found to be inadequately aware of the prevention and correction of disorders and disorders of the musculoskeletal system (MSS) negatively affects its state in their children. Work increasing the parents'awareness has become an integral part of the first developed medicoeducational module which is the basis of a conceptual model to prevent and correct MSS disorders and diseases in schoolchildren. The introduction of the medicoeducational module into the work of comprehensive educational schools with the active participation of parents could reduce the prevalence of functional impairments and early diseases of MSS in schoolchildren by 50% during 3 years.
PubMed ID
22712329 View in PubMed
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[Pharyngotonsillitis: new guidelines require new routines].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186023
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Feb 27;100(9):704-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-27-2003

A primary care cardiovascular risk reduction clinic in Canada was more effective and no more expensive than usual on-demand primary care--a randomised controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149455
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2010 Jan;18(1):30-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Michael Mills
Patricia Loney
Ellen Jamieson
Amiram Gafni
Gina Browne
Barbara Bell
Lori Chalklin
Jim Kraemer
David Wallik
Chris Williams
Stephen Duncan
Author Affiliation
Caroline Medical Group, ystem-Linked Research Unit on Health and Social Service Utilisation, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Health Soc Care Community. 2010 Jan;18(1):30-40
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - psychology - therapy
Female
Health Services - economics - utilization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nurses
Patient Education as Topic - methods - organization & administration
Primary Health Care - methods - organization & administration
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Self Efficacy
Socioeconomic Factors
Telephone - utilization
Abstract
The objective of this randomised controlled trial was to compare the effects and expense of three approaches to care (1) proactive cardiovascular risk reduction (CaRR) clinic; (2) nurse telephone calls; or (3) usual care for people with cardiovascular risk factors in a Primary Care, Health Service Organisation (HSO) in Ontario, Canada. Subjects included consenting patients with an identified cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor identified from the HSO computerised patient information system in 2004. Patients were excluded if they were mentally incompetent,
PubMed ID
19637993 View in PubMed
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Rationale for a home dialysis virtual ward: design and implementation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104973
Source
BMC Nephrol. 2014;15:33
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Michael E Schachter
Joanne M Bargman
Michael Copland
Michelle Hladunewich
Karthik K Tennankore
Adeera Levin
Matthew Oliver
Robert P Pauly
Jeffrey Perl
Deborah Zimmerman
Christopher T Chan
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, University Health Network, 200 Elizabeth Street, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4, Canada. christopher.chan@uhn.ca.
Source
BMC Nephrol. 2014;15:33
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Delivery of Health Care - methods - organization & administration
Hemodialysis, Home - methods
Humans
Patient Education as Topic - methods - organization & administration
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic - diagnosis - therapy
Software
Software Design
Telemedicine - methods - organization & administration
User-Computer Interface
Abstract
Home-based renal replacement therapy (RRT) [peritoneal dialysis (PD) and home hemodialysis (HHD)] offers independent quality of life and clinical advantages compared to conventional in-center hemodialysis. However, follow-up may be less complete for home dialysis patients following a change in care settings such as post hospitalization. We aim to implement a Home Dialysis Virtual Ward (HDVW) strategy, which is targeted to minimize gaps of care.
The HDVW Pilot Study will enroll consecutive PD and HHD patients who fulfilled any one of our inclusion criteria: 1. following discharge from hospital, 2. after interventional procedure(s), 3. prescription of anti-microbial agents, or 4. following completion of home dialysis training. Clinician-led telephone interviews are performed weekly for 2 weeks until VW discharge. Case-mix (modified Charlson Comorbidity Index), symptoms (the modified Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale) and patient satisfaction are assessed serially. The number of VW interventions relating to eight pre-specified domains will be measured. Adverse events such as re-hospitalization and health-services utilization will be ascertained through telephone follow-up after discharge from the VW at 2, 4, 12 weeks. The VW re-hospitalization rate will be compared with a contemporary cohort (matched for age, gender, renal replacement therapy and co-morbidities). Our protocol has been approved by research ethics board (UHN: 12-5397-AE). Written informed consent for participation in the study will be obtained from participants.
This report serves as a blueprint for the design and implementation of a novel health service delivery model for home dialysis patients. The major goal of the HDVW initiative is to provide appropriate and effective supports to medically complex patients in a targeted window of vulnerability.
(NCT01912001).
Notes
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PubMed ID
24528505 View in PubMed
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Rehabilitation interventions for cancer survivors: The influence of context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137932
Source
Acta Oncol. 2011 Feb;50(2):259-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Helle Ploug Hansen
Tine Tjørnhøj-Thomsen
Christoffer Johansen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark. hphansen@health.sdu.dk
Source
Acta Oncol. 2011 Feb;50(2):259-64
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communication
Counseling - methods - organization & administration
Curriculum
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Neoplasms - rehabilitation
Patient Education as Topic - methods - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Research Design
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Survivors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Today more and more people survive cancer. Cancer survivors need help to recover both from the cancer and the treatment. Rehabilitative interventions have been set up to meet their needs. However, there are studies that report no major effects following careful, targeted intervention. Furthermore, it seems difficult to define whether an effect is caused by the intervention or whether it is due to contextual parameters such as human interactions, the organisation, the staff, the physical surroundings or the general atmosphere. The present study examines the influence of three contextual parameters in rehabilitation courses for cancer survivors in Denmark.
The study was based on an ethnographic fieldwork with participant observation at nine week-long courses, on in-depth interviews and on written sources. Fieldwork is well-suited for studying interventions in context, such as social interactions between people and their physical, material and institutional surroundings. The analysis is based on Duranti's and Goodwin's theoretical approach to context.
The findings are categorised into three contextual parameters. The setting, including its aesthetic value, its physical surroundings and the scheduling of the courses. The behavioural environment, which comprised work commitment and the care provided by the staff. The language environment insofar as it facilitated a sense of community.
The results demonstrate the influence of contextual parameters not formalised in the intervention programme. Contexts affect the outcome of an intervention because they frame and inform the teaching, communication and various forms of social gathering. The study suggests that the effects of the intervention as measured by quantitative studies cannot be properly interpreted without taking into account the context within which the intervention is embedded.
PubMed ID
21231787 View in PubMed
Less detail

Teaching and support: nursing input in the postpartum period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227254
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 1991;28(2):131-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
P A Field
M. Renfrew
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 1991;28(2):131-44
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Community Health Nursing
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Length of Stay
Nursing Staff, Hospital
Patient Education as Topic - methods - organization & administration
Postnatal Care
Questionnaires
Social Support
Teaching - methods
Abstract
The findings from two studies, surveys of hospitals and community health units in Alberta, Canada, to determine the policies, procedures and content related to postpartum teaching are presented in this paper. While content covered was extensive the limited time available for teaching suggested that material would have to be presented at a superficial level, with little time for reinforcement. The average time for a home visit by the nurse was 7-12 days post-discharge and in some instances staff shortages precluded a second visit. The most frequent reason for follow-up visits in the community was problems with newborn feeding. Volunteer services in the community, such as the La Lêche League, were frequently not recommended to mothers by hospital nurses, so breastfeeding mothers were left without support at a critical time. While the study did not support the mother's contention in an earlier study that they did not receive information, the lack of opportunity for expansion and reinforcement of provided information would mitigate against adequate maternal education.
PubMed ID
1894461 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.