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The 1st step: a personal health-care planner from the Canadian Cancer Society.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229611
Source
J Palliat Care. 1990;6(2):48-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
C. Jamieson
Source
J Palliat Care. 1990;6(2):48-50
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Neoplasms - psychology
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Voluntary Health Agencies
PubMed ID
2376807 View in PubMed
Less detail

3D visualization as a communicative aid in pharmaceutical advice-giving over distance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132831
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2011;13(3):e50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Ostlund M
Dahlbäck N
Petersson GI
Author Affiliation
eHealth Institute, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden. martin.ostlund@lnu.se
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2011;13(3):e50
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy
Drug Interactions
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Female
Health Services Research
Humans
Imaging, Three-Dimensional - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Pharmaceutical Services - utilization
Program Evaluation
Remote Consultation - methods
Sweden
Telemedicine - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
Medication misuse results in considerable problems for both patient and society. It is a complex problem with many contributing factors, including timely access to product information.
To investigate the value of 3-dimensional (3D) visualization paired with video conferencing as a tool for pharmaceutical advice over distance in terms of accessibility and ease of use for the advice seeker.
We created a Web-based communication service called AssistancePlus that allows an advisor to demonstrate the physical handling of a complex pharmaceutical product to an advice seeker with the aid of 3D visualization and audio/video conferencing. AssistancePlus was tested in 2 separate user studies performed in a usability lab, under realistic settings and emulating a real usage situation. In the first study, 10 pharmacy students were assisted by 2 advisors from the Swedish National Co-operation of Pharmacies' call centre on the use of an asthma inhaler. The student-advisor interview sessions were filmed on video to qualitatively explore their experience of giving and receiving advice with the aid of 3D visualization. In the second study, 3 advisors from the same call centre instructed 23 participants recruited from the general public on the use of 2 products: (1) an insulin injection pen, and (2) a growth hormone injection syringe. First, participants received advice on one product in an audio-recorded telephone call and for the other product in a video-recorded AssistancePlus session (product order balanced). In conjunction with the AssistancePlus session, participants answered a questionnaire regarding accessibility, perceived expressiveness, and general usefulness of 3D visualization for advice-giving over distance compared with the telephone and were given a short interview focusing on their experience of the 3D features.
In both studies, participants found the AssistancePlus service helpful in providing clear and exact instructions. In the second study, directly comparing AssistancePlus and the telephone, AssistancePlus was judged positively for ease of communication (P = .001), personal contact (P = .001), explanatory power (P
Notes
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Cites: Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 1981;20(3):193-2007286037
PubMed ID
21771714 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Can Nurse. 2005 May;101(5):4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Lenora Brace
Source
Can Nurse. 2005 May;101(5):4
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Death
Canada
Humans
Living Wills
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Notes
Comment On: Can Nurse. 2005 Apr;101(4):415974277
PubMed ID
16035509 View in PubMed
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Acute start--chronic needs: education and support for adults who have had acute start dialysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116348
Source
Semin Dial. 2013 Mar-Apr;26(2):184-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Diane Watson
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, University Health Network, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. diane.watson@uhn.ca
Source
Semin Dial. 2013 Mar-Apr;26(2):184-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - therapy
Models, Educational
Ontario
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Renal Dialysis - methods
Social Support
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
For those patients with CKD followed in a pre-dialysis environment, it is well appreciated that modality education leads to an informed decision regarding type of dialysis selected. However, for those individuals starting dialysis acutely and requiring chronic renal replacement therapy, modality education may be lacking. Because of the acuity of the dialysis start, and the intercurrent illness or event which precipitated and acute start, these patients require a specialized approach to education, and indeed, require a combination of education and support to learn about and choose a renal replacement therapy. The University Health Network, in Toronto, Canada, has developed a program and approach to education and support of this group of patients. The approach, results, and theoretical underpinnings of this program are reviewed, and a potential new "hybrid" educational framework is proposed.
PubMed ID
23406334 View in PubMed
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Adoption of an Internet-based patient education programme in psychiatric hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129777
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2011 Dec;18(10):914-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
M. Anttila
M. Välimäki
M. Koivunen
T. Luukkaala
M. Kaila
A. Pitkänen
R. Kontio
Author Affiliation
Finnish Post-Graduate School in Nursing Science, University of Turku, Finland. minna.anttila@utu.fi
Source
J Psychiatr Ment Health Nurs. 2011 Dec;18(10):914-23
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Computers
Computer-Assisted Instruction - methods
Diffusion of Innovation
Female
Finland
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Internet
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Program Evaluation - methods
Psychiatric Nursing - methods
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Internet-based patient support systems are widely assumed to predict a future trend in patient education. Coherent information is still lacking on how patient education is adopted in psychiatric hospitals and how information technology is used in it. Our aim was to describe nurses' adoption of an Internet-based patient education programme and the variables explaining it. The study was based on Rogers' model of the diffusion of innovation. The Internet-based patient education sessions were carried out by nurses on nine acute psychiatric inpatient wards in two Finnish hospitals. They were evaluated with reports and analysed statistically. Out of 100 nurses, 83 adopted the programme during the study period. The nurses fell into Rogers' groups, late majority (72%), laggards (17%), early majority (7%), early adopters (3%) and innovators (1%). Three groups were formed according to their activity: laggards, late majority, adopters (including early majority, early adopters, innovators). There was a statistical difference between the nurses' programme adoption between the two hospitals (P= 0.045): more laggards (65% vs. 35%) and adopters (73% vs. 27%) in the same hospital. The findings help to provide insight into the contexts and settings when adopting information technology programmes in the area of mental health care.
PubMed ID
22070578 View in PubMed
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Adoption of the Healthy Heart Kit by Alberta family physicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147884
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 Mar-Apr;100(2):140-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Raphaël Bize
Ronald C Plotnikoff
Shannon D Scott
Nandini Karunamuni
Wendy Rodgers
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Promotion Studies, School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 Mar-Apr;100(2):140-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alberta
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health promotion
Heart Diseases - prevention & control
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Physician's Practice Patterns
Physicians, Family - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Public Health
Questionnaires
Social Marketing
Abstract
The Healthy Heart Kit (HHK) is a risk management and patient education kit for the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and the promotion of CV health. There are currently no published data examining predictors of HHK use by physicians. The main objective of this study was to examine the association between physicians' characteristics (socio-demographic, cognitive, and behavioural) and the use of the HHK.
All registered family physicians in Alberta (n=3068) were invited to participate in the "Healthy Heart Kit" Study. Consenting physicians (n=153) received the Kit and were requested to use it for two months. At the end of this period, a questionnaire collected data on the frequency of Kit use by physicians, as well as socio-demographic, cognitive, and behavioural variables pertaining to the physicians.
The questionnaire was returned by 115 physicians (follow-up rate = 75%). On a scale ranging from 0 to 100, the mean score of Kit use was 61 [SD=26]. A multiple linear regression showed that "agreement with the Kit" and the degree of "confidence in using the Kit" was strongly associated with Kit use, explaining 46% of the variability for Kit use. Time since graduation was inversely associated with Kit use, and a trend was observed for smaller practices to be associated with lower use.
Given these findings, future research and practice should explore innovative strategies to gain initial agreement among physicians to employ such clinical tools. Participation of older physicians and solo-practitioners in this process should be emphasized.
PubMed ID
19839292 View in PubMed
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Advance directives in family practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221091
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1993 May;39:1087-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1993
Author
N. Kohut
P A Singer
Author Affiliation
Centre for Bioethics, University of Toronto.
Source
Can Fam Physician. 1993 May;39:1087-93
Date
May-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advance Directives - legislation & jurisprudence
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Canada
Communication
Decision Making
Family Practice - methods
Government Regulation
Humans
Internationality
Judicial Role
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Physician's Role
Abstract
Family physicians can play an important role in helping patients and their families to discuss life-sustaining treatments and to complete advance directives. This article reviews the legal status of, and empirical studies on, advance directives and addresses some important clinical questions about their use relevant to family practice.
Notes
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Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1992 Mar;40(3):269-731538048
Cites: Am J Med. 1989 Jun;86(6):645-811659207
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Cites: J Gen Intern Med. 1986 Nov-Dec;1(6):373-93794836
Cites: Wis Med J. 1986 Oct;85(10):17-233798951
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Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1988 Sep;36(9):840-43411069
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Cites: West J Med. 1989 Jun;150(6):705-72750162
Cites: JAMA. 1989 Nov 3;262(17):2415-92795827
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1991 Mar 28;324(13):889-952000111
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Cites: Adv Intern Med. 1991;36:57-792024588
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1993 Feb;41(2):112-68426030
PubMed ID
8499789 View in PubMed
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Advance information improves user satisfaction with the levonorgestrel intrauterine system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189988
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2002 Apr;99(4):608-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
Tiina Backman
Sakke Huhtala
Riitta Luoto
Juhani Tuominen
Ilkka Rauramo
Markku Koskenvuo
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University Hospital, University of Turku, Finland. backman@nly.fimnet.fi
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2002 Apr;99(4):608-13
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Intrauterine Devices, Medicated - utilization
Levonorgestrel - administration & dosage
Odds Ratio
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Women's health
Abstract
To evaluate parameters associated with and the impact of advance information given in a regular outpatient setting on user satisfaction with the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system.
A questionnaire was sent to 23,885 women in Finland who had had a levonorgestrel intrauterine system inserted between 1990 and 1993. The number of returned questionnaires was 17,914 (response rate 75%). Cumulative logistic regression analysis was based on the five-grade scale of satisfaction as a dependent variable.
Most users of the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (74%) were very or fairly satisfied with it, although over 70% of them had chosen it because of dissatisfaction with their previous method of contraception. User satisfaction increased with age and was associated with the amount of information about different symptoms (menstrual, greasiness of hair/skin, pregnancy, pelvic inflammatory disease, and missed periods) regardless of whether the symptom in question was actually experienced. The women who received information about the possibility of absence of menstruation were more satisfied than the less informed women (odds ratio 5.0, 95% confidence interval 4.1, 5.9).
Information received at the insertion visit is strongly associated with increased user satisfaction among the users of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system. The association between high user satisfaction and advance information was strongest regarding the possibility of missing periods.
PubMed ID
12039121 View in PubMed
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The Alaska Education and Research Towards Health (EARTH) Study: cancer risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127401
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2012 Apr;27 Suppl 1:S80-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Anne P Lanier
Diana G Redwood
Janet J Kelly
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, 4000 Ambassador Drive, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA.
Source
J Cancer Educ. 2012 Apr;27 Suppl 1:S80-5
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Chronic Disease
Diet
Female
Health Behavior
Health Education - methods
Health promotion
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Nutritional Status
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Self Administration
Social Marketing
Young Adult
Abstract
The Alaska Education and Research Towards Health (EARTH) Study assessed cancer risk among 3,821 Alaska Native people (AN). We present the prevalence of selected cancer risk factors and comparison with Healthy People 2010 goals. Participants completed extensive computer-assisted self-administered questionnaires on diet, physical activity, tobacco and alcohol use, cancer screening, family history of cancer, and environmental exposures. Measurement data were collected on blood pressure, height, weight, waist/hip circumference, fasting serum lipids, and glucose. Cancer risk factors are high for the Alaska EARTH study population. For all risk factors studied except for vegetable consumption, Alaska EARTH Study participants did not meet Healthy People 2010 goals. This study is unique in providing questionnaire and measurement data of cancer risk factors on a larger study sample than any previous study among AN living in Alaska. Data show that the prevalence of most cancer risk factors exceeded national recommendations. Given the disease disparities that exist for the AN population, these data provide important baseline data that can be used to target health interventions and reduce health disparities.
PubMed ID
22298198 View in PubMed
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407 records – page 1 of 41.