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2095 records – page 1 of 210.

1st Canadian conference on hepatitis C.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191313
Source
Can Nurse. 2001 Aug;97(7):14-6
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Aug-2001

The 1st step: a personal health-care planner from the Canadian Cancer Society.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229611
Source
J Palliat Care. 1990;6(2):48-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
C. Jamieson
Source
J Palliat Care. 1990;6(2):48-50
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Neoplasms - psychology
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Voluntary Health Agencies
PubMed ID
2376807 View in PubMed
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3D visualization as a communicative aid in pharmaceutical advice-giving over distance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132831
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2011;13(3):e50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Ostlund M
Dahlbäck N
Petersson GI
Author Affiliation
eHealth Institute, Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden. martin.ostlund@lnu.se
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2011;13(3):e50
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy
Drug Interactions
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Female
Health Services Research
Humans
Imaging, Three-Dimensional - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Pharmaceutical Services - utilization
Program Evaluation
Remote Consultation - methods
Sweden
Telemedicine - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
Medication misuse results in considerable problems for both patient and society. It is a complex problem with many contributing factors, including timely access to product information.
To investigate the value of 3-dimensional (3D) visualization paired with video conferencing as a tool for pharmaceutical advice over distance in terms of accessibility and ease of use for the advice seeker.
We created a Web-based communication service called AssistancePlus that allows an advisor to demonstrate the physical handling of a complex pharmaceutical product to an advice seeker with the aid of 3D visualization and audio/video conferencing. AssistancePlus was tested in 2 separate user studies performed in a usability lab, under realistic settings and emulating a real usage situation. In the first study, 10 pharmacy students were assisted by 2 advisors from the Swedish National Co-operation of Pharmacies' call centre on the use of an asthma inhaler. The student-advisor interview sessions were filmed on video to qualitatively explore their experience of giving and receiving advice with the aid of 3D visualization. In the second study, 3 advisors from the same call centre instructed 23 participants recruited from the general public on the use of 2 products: (1) an insulin injection pen, and (2) a growth hormone injection syringe. First, participants received advice on one product in an audio-recorded telephone call and for the other product in a video-recorded AssistancePlus session (product order balanced). In conjunction with the AssistancePlus session, participants answered a questionnaire regarding accessibility, perceived expressiveness, and general usefulness of 3D visualization for advice-giving over distance compared with the telephone and were given a short interview focusing on their experience of the 3D features.
In both studies, participants found the AssistancePlus service helpful in providing clear and exact instructions. In the second study, directly comparing AssistancePlus and the telephone, AssistancePlus was judged positively for ease of communication (P = .001), personal contact (P = .001), explanatory power (P
Notes
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Cites: Int J Med Inform. 2006 Aug;75(8):565-7616298545
Cites: BMJ. 2007 May 5;334(7600):94217426062
Cites: Stud Health Technol Inform. 2007;129(Pt 1):82-617911683
Cites: Int J Med Inform. 2008 Feb;77(2):114-2117317292
Cites: J Behav Ther Exp Psychiatry. 2008 Sep;39(3):250-6117720136
Cites: J Med Internet Res. 2008;10(3):e2618762473
Cites: Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 1981;20(3):193-2007286037
PubMed ID
21771714 View in PubMed
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[5-year experience with a clinic for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208414
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 May 20;117(13):1892-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-1997
Author
J A Aarli
O B Tysnes
Author Affiliation
Nevrologisk avdeling, Haukeland Sykehus, Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 May 20;117(13):1892-5
Date
May-20-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis - diagnosis - physiopathology - therapy
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Hospital Units
Humans
Norway
Outpatient Clinics, Hospital
Patient Education as Topic
Abstract
An out-patient service for patients suffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the ALS-clinic, was established at the Department of Neurology, Haukeland Hospital, in 1990. The number of ALS patients who were hospitalised during the period 1990-1995 was 59, with a mean stay in hospital of 14.8 days. Eleven of the patients died in hospital. The ALS-clinic had 127 consultations during the same period, with a mean of 2.2 consultations per patient. Speech difficulties were the dominating problem at 26 of the consultations. 32 patients experienced feeding difficulties, and a percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy was performed in nine cases. Respiratory problems dominated in ten patients, but only two of these patients wanted a home ventilator. Various assistive devices were adapted for 16 patients.
PubMed ID
9214008 View in PubMed
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A 5-year retrospective analysis of employer-provided dental care for Finnish male industrial workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206874
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1997 Dec;25(6):419-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
J. Ahlberg
R. Tuominen
H. Murtomaa
Author Affiliation
Department of Dental Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland. jari.ahlberg@helsinki.fi
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1997 Dec;25(6):419-22
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
American Dental Association
DMF Index
Dental Care - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dental Prophylaxis
Dental Records
Dental Restoration, Permanent
Dentures
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Finland - epidemiology
Health Education, Dental
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health Services - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Oral Health
Oral Hygiene
Patient Education as Topic
Periodontal Diseases - therapy
Radiography, Dental
Retrospective Studies
Root Canal Therapy
Time Factors
United States
Abstract
The treatment-mix, treatment time, and dental status of 268 male industrial workers entitled to employer-provided dental care were studied. The data were collected from treatment records of the covered workers over the 5-year period 1989-93. Treatment time was based on clinical treatment time recorded per patient visit, and the treatment procedure codes were reclassified into a treatment-mix according to American Dental Association categories, with a modification combining endodontics and restorative treatment. The mean number of check-ups followed by prescribed treatment (treatment courses) during the 5 years was 3.7 among those who had entered the in-house dental care program prior to the monitored period (old attenders). Their treatment time was stable, 57-63 min per year, while the first-year mean treatment time (170 min) of those who had entered the program during the study period (new attenders) was significantly higher (P
PubMed ID
9429814 View in PubMed
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The 1982 Hoechst Lecture: "Cost effectiveness--the emerging 'bottom line' for pharmacy?!".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243460
Source
Can J Hosp Pharm. 1982 Mar-Apr;35(2):39-41
Publication Type
Article
Author
J A Marshman
Source
Can J Hosp Pharm. 1982 Mar-Apr;35(2):39-41
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Efficiency
Humans
Ontario
Patient Education as Topic - economics
Pharmacy Service, Hospital - economics
Abstract
In the current climate of budgetary restraint in the health care system, cost effectiveness is a concept which surfaces with increasing frequency, especially in reference to health care services funded by government. Since significant elements of pharmacy services in Canada are thus funded (including in most provinces, hospital pharmacy services, and prescription drug plans for senior citizens), it is important that pharmacy "tune into" the concept, and recognize it as an essential criterion to be met in the maintenance of existing services and in the development of new services. Prerequisite to a consideration of cost effectiveness is, of course, consideration of effectiveness; and a statement about the effectiveness; and a statement about the effectiveness of a service implies a potential for measurement of effect or outcome. In the 1980s, as pharmacy focuses its efforts on patients rather than products, that effect must surely be defined in "people" terms. One of the important dimensions of today's patient-focussed pharmacy services is patient counselling, more broadly, patient education.
PubMed ID
10309676 View in PubMed
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The 2005 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: part 1- blood pressure measurement, diagnosis and assessment of risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173955
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jun;21(8):645-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Finlay A McAllister
Martin G Myers
Donald W McKay
Peter Bolli
Carl Abbott
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Steven Grover
George Honos
Marcel Lebel
Karen Mann
Thomas Wilson
Brian Penner
Guy Tremblay
Sheldon W Tobe
Ross D Feldman
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jun;21(8):645-56
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Canada
Decision Trees
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - prevention & control
Patient Education as Topic
Risk assessment
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of adults with high blood pressure (BP).
For persons in whom a high BP value is recorded, the assignment of a diagnosis of hypertension is dependent on the appropriate measurement of BP, the level of the BP elevation and the duration of follow-up. In addition, the presence of cardiovascular risk factors and target organ damage should be assessed to determine the urgency, intensity and type of treatment. For persons diagnosed as having hypertension, estimating overall risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes requires an assessment of other vascular risk factors and hypertensive target organ damage.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2003 to October 2004 to update the 2004 recommendations. Reference lists were scanned, experts were polled, and the personal files of the authors and subgroup members were used to identify other studies. Identified articles were reviewed and appraised using prespecified levels of evidence by content and methodological experts. As per previous years, only studies that had been published in the peer-reviewed literature were included; evidence from abstracts, conference presentations and unpublished personal communications was not included.
This document contains recommendations for BP measurement, diagnosis of hypertension and assessment of cardiovascular risk for adults with high BP. These include the accurate measurement of BP, criteria for diagnosis of hypertension, and recommendations for follow-up, assessment of overall cardiovascular risk, routine and optional laboratory testing, assessment for renovascular and endocrine causes, home and ambulatory BP monitoring, and the role of echocardiography for those with hypertension. Key features of the 2005 recommendations include an expedited diagnostic algorithm for hypertension and an endorsement of the use of home/self and ambulatory BP assessment as validated techniques in establishing the diagnosis of hypertension.
All recommendations were graded according to the strength of the evidence and voted on by the 43 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. All recommendations reported in the present paper received at least 95% consensus. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
PubMed ID
16003448 View in PubMed
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The 2005 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: part II - therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173954
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jun;21(8):657-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Nadia A Khan
Finlay A McAlister
Richard Z Lewanczuk
Rhian M Touyz
Raj Padwal
Simon W Rabkin
Lawrence A Leiter
Marcel Lebel
Carol Herbert
Ernesto L Schiffrin
Robert J Herman
Pavel Hamet
George Fodor
George Carruthers
Bruce Culleton
Jacques DeChamplain
George Pylypchuk
Alexander G Logan
Norm Gledhill
Robert Petrella
Norman R C Campbell
Malcolm Arnold
Gordon Moe
Micharl D Hill
Charlotte Jones
Pierre Larochelle
Richard I Ogilvie
Sheldon Tobe
Robyn Houlden
Ellen Burgess
Ross D Feldman
Author Affiliation
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jun;21(8):657-72
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Canada
Diet
Evidence-Based Medicine
Exercise
Humans
Hypertension - therapy
Patient Education as Topic
Weight Loss
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the management of hypertension in adults.
For lifestyle and pharmacological interventions, evidence from randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews of trials was preferentially reviewed. While changes in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality were the primary outcomes of interest, for lifestyle interventions, blood pressure lowering was accepted as a primary outcome given the lack of long-term morbidity/mortality data in this field, and for certain comorbid conditions, other relevant outcomes, such as development of proteinuria or worsening of kidney function, were considered.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2003 to October 2004 to update the 2004 recommendations. Reference lists were scanned, experts were contacted, and the personal files of the subgroup members and authors were used to identify additional published studies. All relevant articles were reviewed and appraised independently, using prespecified levels of evidence, by content and methodology experts. As per previous years, only studies that had been published in the peer-reviewed literature were included; evidence from abstracts, conference presentations and unpublished personal communications was not included.
Lifestyle modifications to prevent and/or treat hypertension include the following: perform 30 min to 60 min of aerobic exercise on four to seven days of the week; maintain a healthy body weight (body mass index of 18.5 kg/m2 to 24.9 kg/m2) and waist circumference (less than 102 cm for men and less than 88 cm for women); limit alcohol consumption to no more than 14 units per week in men or nine units per week in women; follow a reduced fat, low cholesterol diet with an adequate intake of potassium, magnesium and calcium; restrict salt intake; and consider stress management (in selected individuals). Treatment thresholds and targets should take into account each individual's global atherosclerotic risk, target organ damage and any comorbid conditions. Blood pressure should be lowered to 140/90 mmHg or less in all patients, and to 130/80 mmHg or less in those with diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease. Most adults with hypertension require more than one agent to achieve target blood pressures. For adults without compelling indications for other agents, initial therapy should include thiazide diuretics. Other agents appropriate for first-line therapy for diastolic hypertension with or without systolic hypertension include beta-blockers (in those younger than 60 years), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (except in black patients), long-acting calcium channel blockers and angiotensin receptor antagonists. Other agents appropriate for first-line therapy for isolated systolic hypertension include long-acting dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers and angiotensin receptor antagonists. Certain comorbid conditions provide compelling indications for first-line use of other agents: in patients with angina, recent myocardial infarction or heart failure, beta-blockers and ACE inhibitors are recommended as first-line therapy; in patients with diabetes mellitus, ACE inhibitors or angiotensin receptor antagonists (or thiazides in patients with diabetes mellitus without albuminuria) are appropriate first-line therapies; and in patients with nondiabetic chronic kidney disease, ACE inhibitors are recommended. All hypertensive patients should have their fasting lipids screened, and those with dyslipidemia should be treated using the thresholds, targets and agents recommended by the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Working Group on the management of dyslipidemia and the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Selected patients with hypertension, but without dyslipidemia, should also receive statin therapy and/or acetylsalicylic acid therapy.
All recommendations were graded according to the strength of the evidence and voted on by the 43 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. All recommendations reported here achieved at least 95% consensus. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
PubMed ID
16003449 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2006 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part I--Blood pressure measurement, diagnosis and assessment of risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168977
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):573-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2006
Author
B R Hemmelgarn
Finlay A McAlister
Steven Grover
Martin G Myers
Donald W McKay
Peter Bolli
Carl Abbott
Ernesto L Schiffrin
George Honos
Ellen Burgess
Karen Mann
Thomas Wilson
Brian Penner
Guy Tremblay
Alain Milot
Arun Chockalingam
Rhian M Touyz
Sheldon W Tobe
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, University of Calgary, and Foothills Hospital, 1403 29th Street Northwest, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. brenda.hemmelgarn@calgaryhealthregion.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):573-81
Date
May-15-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees
Blood Pressure Determination
Canada
Echocardiography
Humans
Hyperaldosteronism - diagnosis
Hypertension - diagnosis
Mass Screening
Patient Education as Topic
Pheochromocytoma - diagnosis
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of adults with high blood pressure.
For persons in whom a high blood pressure value is recorded, a diagnosis of hypertension is dependent on the appropriate measurement of blood pressure, the level of the blood pressure elevation, the approach used to monitor blood pressure (office, ambulatory or home/self), and the duration of follow-up. In addition, the presence of cardiovascular risk factors and target organ damage should be assessed to determine the urgency, intensity and type of treatment. For persons diagnosed as having hypertension, estimating the overall risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes requires an assessment for other vascular risk factors and hypertensive target organ damage.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2004 to October 2005 to update the 2005 recommendations. Reference lists were scanned, experts were polled, and the personal files of the authors and subgroup members were used to identify other studies. Identified articles were reviewed and appraised using prespecified levels of evidence by content and methodological experts. As per previous years, the authors only included studies that had been published in the peer-reviewed literature and did not include evidence from abstracts, conference presentations or unpublished personal communications.
The present document contains recommendations for blood pressure measurement, diagnosis of hypertension, and assessment of cardiovascular risk for adults with high blood pressure. These include the accurate measurement of blood pressure, criteria for the diagnosis of hypertension and recommendations for follow-up, assessment of overall cardiovascular risk, routine and optional laboratory testing, assessment for renovascular and endocrine causes, home and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, and the role of echocardiography for those with hypertension. Key features of the 2006 recommendations include continued emphasis on an expedited diagnosis of hypertension, an in-depth review of the role of global risk assessment in hypertension therapy, and the use of home/self blood pressure monitoring for patients with masked hypertension (subjects with hypertension who have a blood pressure that is normal in clinic but elevated on home/self measurement).
All recommendations were graded according to the strength of the evidence and were voted on by the 45 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. All recommendations reported herein received at least 95% consensus. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16755312 View in PubMed
Less detail

2095 records – page 1 of 210.