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[4 weeks in Vindeln teaches patients to eat, live and get good exercise. Interview by Anita Widén.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50401
Source
Vardfacket. 1984 Mar 8;8(5):8-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-8-1984
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1985 Feb;3(1):55-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1985
Author
B O Larsen
E H Hansen
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1985 Feb;3(1):55-9
Date
Feb-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Drug Therapy - psychology
Humans
Male
Patient compliance
Patient Education - methods
Physician-Patient Relations
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sick Role
Abstract
The purpose of the study is to analyse medicine behaviour seen from the user's point of view. The study intends to generate ideas to specify topics of problems and to try out a combination of qualitative research methods. The practitioners and four asthmatic patients attached to a health centre in Billund, Denmark, were interviewed. The patients kept a diary based on topics, the notes of which were elaborated by weekly telephone interviews. In a final interview all participants evaluated the course of the study. The combination of qualitative methods has been very suitable to provide the perspective of the user. The results of the study question the ideal picture of the patient as a passive user of medicine. The main trends show that: the users develop different strategies to evaluate medication therapy; it has negative consequences to the patient when medication is changed regardless of patient experience; the therapy improves when the doctor draws on the experience of the patient. The study contributes to the present, sparse knowledge about the consciously acting user of medicine and indicates the importance of incorporating the user's experience and life situation in the health care system's handling of health problems.
PubMed ID
4059699 View in PubMed
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Assisting teens with asthma to take command.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81969
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2006 Jun;20(2):193-201
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Englund Ann-Charlotte
Hartman Jan
Segesten Kerstin
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, Boras University College, Boras, Sweden. lotta.englund@hb.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2006 Jun;20(2):193-201
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adolescent Psychology
Adult
Asthma - prevention & control - psychology
Attitude of Health Personnel
Camping - psychology
Female
Helping Behavior
Humans
Laboratory Personnel - psychology
Male
Medical Staff - psychology
Middle Aged
Motivation
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff - psychology
Patient Education - methods
Personal Autonomy
Physical Therapy (Specialty)
Professional Role
Questionnaires
Self Care - methods - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
To meet and work with teenagers may be a challenge for caregivers as adolescence is a period when youths try to establish autonomy. Although asthma is an increasing problem worldwide, few studies have addressed professional caregivers' motives and actions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to describe professional caregivers' strategies in their work with teenagers with asthma. Grounded theory, inspired by Glaser, was used to uncover the phenomenon. The informants were seven professional caregivers who worked at an eight-day asthma camp for teenagers in Sweden. Participant observations and interviews were used, and the first author collected the data and participated in the activities. Findings show that professional caregivers' core concern is to assist teenagers with asthma to take command. This core concern gives rise to five strategies: showing respect, being at hand, promoting own responsibility, promoting to exceed boundaries and promoting reflections. In professional caregivers' attempt to assist teenagers to take command some differences are seen in the way they support boys and girls. One conclusion drawn from our study is that the provisional theory of 'Assisting teenagers with asthma to take command' is not only suitable for professional caregivers working at asthma camps; it may, in some degree, also be used as a source of inspiration for professional caregivers in other settings.
PubMed ID
16756525 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 Aug 25;159(35):5224-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-25-1997
Author
T. Bendix
A F Bendix
Author Affiliation
H:S Rigshospitalet, medicinsk ortopaedisk afdeling.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 Aug 25;159(35):5224-6
Date
Aug-25-1997
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Back Pain - prevention & control - rehabilitation
Denmark
Exercise
Humans
Patient Education - methods
PubMed ID
9297327 View in PubMed
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Burns prevention in Europe--a report of a study tour 1982.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8817
Source
Burns Incl Therm Inj. 1983 May;9(5):312-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1983
Author
M. Gunay
Source
Burns Incl Therm Inj. 1983 May;9(5):312-7
Date
May-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Home - prevention & control
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Audiovisual Aids
Burn Units
Burns - prevention & control
Child
Child, Preschool
Consumer Advocacy - legislation & jurisprudence
Denmark
Female
Great Britain
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands
Patient Education - methods
Schools
Abstract
As in burns treatment, certain countries in Western Europe have also been able to achieve a lot in the field of Burns Prevention. In order to learn about the methods of prevention adopted by these countries and their effectiveness, a short study tour was sponsored by the Burns Association of India and the Sir Dorabji Tata Trust.
PubMed ID
6191845 View in PubMed
Less detail

Care diaries: a way of increasing head and neck cancer patient's involvement in their own care and the communication between clinicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17602
Source
Cancer Nurs. 2004 Mar-Apr;27(2):119-26
Publication Type
Article
Author
Lena Sharp
Göran Laurell
Ylva Tiblom
Arja Andersson
Ros-Marie Birksjö
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Huddinge University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. lena.sharp@hs.se
Source
Cancer Nurs. 2004 Mar-Apr;27(2):119-26
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Communication
Family - psychology
Female
Forms and Records Control
Head and Neck Neoplasms - psychology
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Records - standards
Patient Care Team - organization & administration
Patient Education - methods - standards
Patient Participation - methods - psychology
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
Head and neck (H&N) cancer patients and their families meet a large number of clinicians during their long treatment period and many of them find it difficult to understand all the information given concerning their illness, treatment, and care. We have developed a care diary for these patients and their families, used also by the clinicians involved, to improve communication and patient involvement. The present survey was an evaluation of the helpfulness of those diaries. Anonymous answered questionnaires were collected from 42 H&N cancer patients, 28 family members, and 47 clinicians of different categories. Altogether 85% of the respondents stated that the care diaries had a positive effect on information, in general, and communication. It is recommended that care diaries should be implemented in the standard care for H&N cancer patients and their families. To improve the clinical value, it is particularly important to inform the clinicians on how to use the care diaries. The content and layout of the care diaries needs to be developed according to suggestions given from the respondents in this survey.
PubMed ID
15253169 View in PubMed
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Changes in conceptions and attitudes during five years of intensified conventional insulin treatment in the Stockholm Diabetes Intervention Study (SDIS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48423
Source
Diabetes Educ. 1994 Nov-Dec;20(6):503-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
P. Reichard
B. Toomingas
U. Rosenqvist
Source
Diabetes Educ. 1994 Nov-Dec;20(6):503-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - complications - rehabilitation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Insulin - therapeutic use
Male
Patient Education - methods
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
Previous studies have demonstrated that intensified treatment can result in lower blood glucose concentrations and retard microvascular complications. In the Stockholm Diabetes Intervention Study, 96 patients were followed for 5 years; 44 patients received intensified, conventional treatment and 52 patients received regular treatment. Changes in conceptions and attitudes that accompanied intensified treatment were evaluated with questionnaires and semistructured interviews. After education and personal tutoring, HbAlc was significantly lower in patients in the intensified treatment group compared with patients in the regular treatment group. Self-rated well-being and perceived ability to control the diabetes increased more in the patients in the intensified treatment group. Blood glucose testing became more important to the patients in the intensified treatment group, who used the blood glucose tests more frequently whenever necessary, and who acted on the test results. Microvascular complications were retarded or halted.
PubMed ID
7851263 View in PubMed
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A comparison of women's memories of care during pregnancy, labour and delivery after stillbirth or live birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58874
Source
Midwifery. 1998 Jun;14(2):111-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998
Author
I. Rådestad
C. Nordin
G. Steineck
B. Sjögren
Author Affiliation
Centre of Caring Sciences North (CWN), Karolinska Institute, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Midwifery. 1998 Jun;14(2):111-7
Date
Jun-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Case-Control Studies
Comparative Study
Delivery, Obstetric - methods - psychology
Female
Fetal Death - etiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Labor, Obstetric - psychology
Memory
Mothers - education - psychology
Patient Education - methods
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy - psychology
Prenatal Care - methods
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare women's reports of aspects of their care during pregnancy, labour and delivery following stillbirth and live birth. DESIGN: Data were collected by postal questionnaire in 1994. SETTING: A Swedish nation-wide population-based study of cohorts defined in 1991. PARTICIPANTS: Three hundred and fourteen women with stillbirth (subjects) and 322 women with live birth (controls). MEASUREMENTS AND FINDINGS: Labour and delivery were assessed as physically 'insufferably hard' by 52 (17%) of the subjects and 33 (10%) of the controls. The corresponding figures for emotional strains were 144 (47%) and 21 (7%). Obstetric analgesia was more frequently used during labour for stillbirth. One hundred and thirty-eight (44%) subjects, as compared to 44 (2%) of the controls, left hospital within 24 hours of birth. Almost all the women with stillbirth 296 (95%) stated that it was important to have an explanation of the baby's death. Adverse events related to bromocriptine given to inhibit postpartum lactation, were reported by 60 (22%) of the subjects. KEY CONCLUSIONS: It is possible to ease the distress of labour and delivery for stillbirth. Discussion of the aetiology of the baby's death with the mother should be a priority. The optimal length of stay in hospital after stillbirth remains to be defined. Non-pharmacological inhibition of lactation may be presented as an alternative to bromocriptine, breast binding is a concrete 'reality confrontation' for the woman and may aid her in her grieving process. Further studies concerning breast binding vs pharmacological inhibition of lactation and long-term psychological outcome are warranted.
PubMed ID
10382480 View in PubMed
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87 records – page 1 of 9.