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1389 records – page 1 of 139.

1,005 delayed days: a study of adult psychiatric discharge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244608
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1981 Apr;32(4):266-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1981
Author
P A Barrette
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1981 Apr;32(4):266-8
Date
Apr-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Hospitals, Community
Hospitals, Psychiatric - organization & administration
Humans
Length of Stay
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Patient Discharge
Abstract
Delay in discharge of psychiatric patients frequently is attributed to the lack of available community resources, or to the unwillingness of the patient or his family to accept discharge or transfer to another facility. The role of the psychiatric system itself rarely is mentioned as a factor. A study of 138 psychiatric patients in a Canadian community hospital in 1978 showed that 35 per cent were judged to be delayed in their discharge. By far the greatest source of delay was the administration of the various psychiatric services within the system. Delayed patients were found to be statistically similar to nondelayed patients, except for the delayed patients tendency to be poorer and to be overrepresented on two of the six wards studied. The cost implications of the delays in discharge are discussed, as are suggestions for solving the problems within the administrative framework.
PubMed ID
7227988 View in PubMed
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[6 months after psychiatric hospitalization. Discharged patients have no housing ].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217704
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Jul 27;91(30-31):2789-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-27-1994
Author
L. Bogren
Author Affiliation
Psykiatriska kliniken, Universitetssjukhuset i Linköping.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1994 Jul 27;91(30-31):2789-92
Date
Jul-27-1994
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dementia - nursing - psychology - therapy
Housing
Humans
Length of Stay
Mental Disorders - nursing - psychology - therapy
Patient Discharge
Social Support
Sweden
PubMed ID
8057734 View in PubMed
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[10-year mortality of patients admitted to coronary units with or without confirmed diagnosis of myocardial infarction. A relation to anamnesis and diagnosis at discharge]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48374
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Jul 3;157(27):3894-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-3-1995
Author
J. Launbjerg
P. Fruergaard
J K Madsen
L S Mortensen
J F Hansen
Author Affiliation
Medicinsk afdeling B, Hillerød Sygehus.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1995 Jul 3;157(27):3894-7
Date
Jul-3-1995
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Coronary Care Units - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis - drug therapy - mortality
Patient Admission
Patient Discharge
Prognosis
Risk factors
Time Factors
Verapamil - therapeutic use
Abstract
The ten-year mortality in patients with suspected myocardial infarction with (AMI) and without (non-AMI) confirmed diagnosis was evaluated in 1897 non-AMI patients and 1401 AMI patients who were consecutively admitted to hospital during The Danish Verapamil Infarction Study. The following risk factors contained independent prognostic information about mortality for non-AMI patients: age, previous AMI, sex and diabetes. In patients with AMI the risk factors were: age, previous AMI, clinical heart failure, diabetes and angina pectoris. When the diagnosis at discharge for non-AMI patients was included in the Cox-analysis, only the diagnoses of bronchopneumonia, musculoskeletal disorders and observation only of added prognostic information. We conclude that non-AMI patients are at high risk for mortal events in the long-term. High risk patients can be identified from the medical history and should be carefully evaluated regarding coronary artery disease at the time of discharge in order to improve the risk stratification, treatment and prognosis.
PubMed ID
7645063 View in PubMed
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A 15-year national follow-up: legislation is not enough to reduce the use of seclusion and restraint.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162773
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2007 Sep;42(9):747-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Alice Keski-Valkama
Eila Sailas
Markku Eronen
Anna-Maija Koivisto
Jouko Lönnqvist
Riittakerttu Kaltiala-Heino
Author Affiliation
Vanha Vaasa Hospital, PO Box 13, Vaasa, 65381 Finland. alice.keski-valkama@vvs.fi
Source
Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2007 Sep;42(9):747-52
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Coercion
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Mental Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Middle Aged
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Registries
Restraint, Physical - legislation & jurisprudence - utilization
Abstract
Seclusion and restraint are frequent but controversial coercive measures used in psychiatric treatment. Legislative efforts have started to emerge to control the use of these measures in many countries. In the present study, the nationwide trends in the use of seclusion and restraint were investigated in Finland over a 15-year span which was characterised by legislative changes aiming to clarify and restrict the use of these measures.
The data were collected during a predetermined week in 1990, 1991, 1994, 1998 and 2004, using a structured postal survey of Finnish psychiatric hospitals. The numbers of inpatients during the study weeks were obtained from the National Hospital Discharge Register.
The total number of the secluded and restrained patients declined as did the number of all inpatients during the study weeks, but the risk of being secluded or restrained remained the same over time when compared to the first study year. The duration of the restraint incidents did not change, but the duration of seclusion increased. A regional variation was found in the use of coercive measures.
Legislative changes solely cannot reduce the use of seclusion and restraint or change the prevailing treatment cultures connected with these measures. The use of seclusion and restraint should be vigilantly monitored and ethical questions should be under continuous scrutiny.
PubMed ID
17598058 View in PubMed
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30-Day Survival Probabilities as a Quality Indicator for Norwegian Hospitals: Data Management and Analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273361
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(9):e0136547
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Sahar Hassani
Anja Schou Lindman
Doris Tove Kristoffersen
Oliver Tomic
Jon Helgeland
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(9):e0136547
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comorbidity
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Episode of Care
Hospital Mortality
Hospital records
Hospitals - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Length of Stay
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Patient transfer
Probability
Quality Improvement
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Survival Analysis
Abstract
The Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services (NOKC) reports 30-day survival as a quality indicator for Norwegian hospitals. The indicators have been published annually since 2011 on the website of the Norwegian Directorate of Health (www.helsenorge.no), as part of the Norwegian Quality Indicator System authorized by the Ministry of Health. Openness regarding calculation of quality indicators is important, as it provides the opportunity to critically review and discuss the method. The purpose of this article is to describe the data collection, data pre-processing, and data analyses, as carried out by NOKC, for the calculation of 30-day risk-adjusted survival probability as a quality indicator.
Three diagnosis-specific 30-day survival indicators (first time acute myocardial infarction (AMI), stroke and hip fracture) are estimated based on all-cause deaths, occurring in-hospital or out-of-hospital, within 30 days counting from the first day of hospitalization. Furthermore, a hospital-wide (i.e. overall) 30-day survival indicator is calculated. Patient administrative data from all Norwegian hospitals and information from the Norwegian Population Register are retrieved annually, and linked to datasets for previous years. The outcome (alive/death within 30 days) is attributed to every hospital by the fraction of time spent in each hospital. A logistic regression followed by a hierarchical Bayesian analysis is used for the estimation of risk-adjusted survival probabilities. A multiple testing procedure with a false discovery rate of 5% is used to identify hospitals, hospital trusts and regional health authorities with significantly higher/lower survival than the reference. In addition, estimated risk-adjusted survival probabilities are published per hospital, hospital trust and regional health authority. The variation in risk-adjusted survival probabilities across hospitals for AMI shows a decreasing trend over time: estimated survival probabilities for AMI in 2011 varied from 80.6% (in the hospital with lowest estimated survival) to 91.7% (in the hospital with highest estimated survival), whereas it ranged from 83.8% to 91.2% in 2013.
Since 2011, several hospitals and hospital trusts have initiated quality improvement projects, and some of the hospitals have improved the survival over these years. Public reporting of survival/mortality indicators are increasingly being used as quality measures of health care systems. Openness regarding the methods used to calculate the indicators are important, as it provides the opportunity of critically reviewing and discussing the methods in the literature. In this way, the methods employed for establishing the indicators may be improved.
Notes
Cites: PLoS Med. 2010;7(11):e100100421151347
Cites: Med Care. 2010 Dec;48(12):1117-2120978451
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:36423088745
Cites: Qual Saf Health Care. 2003 Apr;12(2):100-612679505
Cites: Int J Qual Health Care. 2001 Dec;13(6):475-8011769750
Cites: BMJ Open. 2015;5(3):e00674125808167
Cites: BMJ. 2003 Apr 12;326(7393):816-912689983
Cites: Int J Qual Health Care. 2003 Dec;15(6):523-3014660535
Cites: Stat Med. 1994 May 15;13(9):889-9038047743
Cites: Health Care Financ Rev. 1995 Summer;16(4):107-2710151883
Cites: Heart. 1996 Jul;76(1):70-58774332
Cites: Stat Med. 1997 Dec 15;16(23):2645-649421867
Cites: Med Care. 2005 Nov;43(11):1130-916224307
Cites: Circulation. 2006 Jan 24;113(3):456-6216365198
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2011 Mar 15;173(6):676-8221330339
PubMed ID
26352600 View in PubMed
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[Abbreviated surgical stay programs--a professional and administrative challenge].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195039
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Mar 10;121(7):812-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-10-2001
Author
H. Kehlet
Author Affiliation
Kirurgisk sektion 435 Gastroenheden H:S Hvidovre Hospital DK-2650 Hvidovre.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Mar 10;121(7):812-5
Date
Mar-10-2001
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Convalescence
Humans
Length of Stay
Norway
Patient Discharge
Patient Education as Topic
Postoperative Care - economics - methods - standards
Preoperative Care - economics - methods - standards
Stress, Psychological
Surgical Procedures, Operative - adverse effects - economics - methods - standards
Time Factors
Abstract
Accelerated surgical stay programs represent a multi-modal, multi-disciplinary concept to reduce postoperative morbidity, hospitalisation and convalescence based upon recent advantages in surgical pathophysiology and pain treatment. Preliminary data from a variety of surgical procedures suggest major improvements in quality of surgical care and cost reduction and call for further controlled or large-size multicenter studies.
PubMed ID
11301705 View in PubMed
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The ability to achieve complete revascularization is associated with improved in-hospital survival in cardiogenic shock due to myocardial infarction: Manitoba cardiogenic SHOCK Registry investigators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134718
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2011 Oct 1;78(4):540-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-2011
Author
Farrukh Hussain
Roger K Philipp
Robin A Ducas
Jason Elliott
Vladimír D┼żavík
Davinder S Jassal
James W Tam
Daniel Roberts
Philip J Garber
John Ducas
Author Affiliation
Section of Cardiology Dept. of Cardiac Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. fhussain@sbgh.mb.ca
Source
Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2011 Oct 1;78(4):540-8
Date
Oct-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - adverse effects - mortality
Cardiovascular Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Catheterization, Swan-Ganz
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Bypass - adverse effects - mortality
Female
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - complications - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Odds Ratio
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Shock, Cardiogenic - diagnosis - etiology - mortality - therapy
Survival Analysis
Survival Rate
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To identify predictors of survival in a retrospective multicentre cohort of patients with cardiogenic shock undergoing coronary angiography and to address whether complete revascularization is associated with improved survival in this cohort.
Early revascularization is the standard of care for cardiogenic shock. Coronary bypass grafting and percutaneous intervention have complimentary roles in achieving this revascularization.
A total of 210 consecutive patients (mean age 66 ± 12 years) at two tertiary centres from 2002 to 2006 inclusive with a diagnosis of cardiogenic shock were evaluated. Univariate and multivariate predictors of in-hospital survival were identified utilizing logistic regression.
ST elevation infarction occurred in 67% of patients. Thrombolysis was administered in 34%, PCI was attempted in 62% (88% stented, 76% TIMI 3 flow), CABG was performed in 22% (2.7 grafts, 14 valve procedures), and medical therapy alone was administered to the remainder. The overall survival to discharge was 59% (CABG 68%, PCI 57%, medical 48%). Independent predictors of mortality included complete revascularization (P = 0.013, OR = 0.26 (95% CI: 0.09-0.76), hyperlactatemia (P = 0.046, OR = 1.14 (95% CI: 1.002-1.3) per mmol increase), baseline renal insufficiency (P = 0.043, OR = 3.45, (95% CI: 1.04-11.4), and the presence of anoxic brain injury (P = 0.008, OR = 8.22 (95% CI: 1.73-39.1). Within the STEMI with concomitant multivessel coronary disease subgroup of this population (N = 101), independent predictors of survival to discharge included complete revascularization (P = 0.03, OR = 2.5 (95% CI: 1.1-6.2)) and peak lactate (P = 0.02).
The ability to achieve complete revascularization may be strongly associated with improved in-hospital survival in patients with cardiogenic shock.
Notes
Comment In: Catheter Cardiovasc Interv. 2011 Oct 1;78(4):549-5021953751
PubMed ID
21547996 View in PubMed
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[Accelerated course in hip arthroplasty]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61715
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Dec 3;163(49):6912-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-3-2001
Author
S. Rasmussen
M U Kramhøft
K P Sperling
J H Pedersen
I B Falck
E M Pedersen
H. Kehlet
Author Affiliation
Privathospitalet Hamlet, Frederiksberg. sten.rasmussen@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Dec 3;163(49):6912-6
Date
Dec-3-2001
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - adverse effects - nursing - rehabilitation
Denmark
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Patient Discharge
Physical Therapy Modalities
Postoperative Care - methods
Preoperative Care - methods
Prospective Studies
Recovery of Function
Rehabilitation Nursing - methods
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The aim of the study was to assess the results of a well-defined rehabilitation programme after hip arthroplasty. METHODS: The effects of a revised, optimised, perioperative care programme with continuous epidural analgesia, oral nutrition, and physiotherapy were assessed in 60 patients before intervention and 60 patients after intervention. RESULTS: The hospital stay was reduced from nine to six days (p
PubMed ID
11766505 View in PubMed
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[Accelerated surgical stay programs. A professional and administrative challenge].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195646
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Jan 22;163(4):420-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-22-2001
Author
H. Kehlet
Author Affiliation
H:S Hvidovre Hospital, gastroenheden, kirurgisk afsnit.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Jan 22;163(4):420-4
Date
Jan-22-2001
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Convalescence
Denmark
Humans
Length of Stay
Patient Discharge
Patient Education as Topic
Postoperative Care - economics - methods - standards
Preoperative Care - economics - methods - standards
Stress, Psychological
Surgical Procedures, Operative - adverse effects - economics - methods - standards
Time Factors
Abstract
Accelerated surgical stay programs represent a multi-modal, multi-disciplinary concept to reduce postoperative morbidity, hospitalisation and convalescence based upon recent advantages in surgical pathophysiology and pain treatment. Preliminary data from a variety of surgical procedures suggest major improvements in quality of surgical care and cost reduction and call for further controlled or large-size multi-center studies.
Notes
Comment In: Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Jan 22;163(4):41511218774
PubMed ID
11218776 View in PubMed
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[Accelerated versus conventional hospital stay in total hip and knee arthroplasty III: patient satisfaction]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81877
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 May 29;168(22):2148-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-29-2006
Author
Husted Henrik
Hansen Hans Christian
Holm Gitte
Bach-Dal Charlotte
Rud Kirsten
Andersen Kristoffer Lande
Kehlet Henrik
Author Affiliation
H:S Hvidovre Hospital, Ortopaedkirurgisk Afdeling, Hvidovre. henrikhusted@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 May 29;168(22):2148-51
Date
May-29-2006
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Comorbidity
Denmark
Early Ambulation
Female
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Patient satisfaction
Questionnaires
Registries
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The goal of this study was to evaluate patient satisfaction with the hospital stay in relation to the length of stay for patients operated on with primary total hip- and knee-arthroplasty (THA and TKA). MATERIALS AND METHODS: According to the National Register on Patients, the three departments with the shortest and the three departments with the longest postoperative hospital stay at the end of 2003 were chosen for evaluation. The patients, operated on with THA or TKA from September 2004 to April 2005, from the selected departments answered a questionnaire regarding satisfaction with elected parts of their stay, co-morbidity, sex and age. RESULTS: The patients from the departments with the shortest stay were not younger nor had they less co-morbidities than patients from departments with longer stays. Apart from staying a significantly shorter time, they were either as satisfied--or sometimes more satisfied--with all parts of their stay compared to patients from the departments with longer hospital stay. CONCLUSION: Patients in accelerated stays are not less satisfied with their hospital stay (or any part of it) compared to patients with longer and more conventional hospital stays. These results support the implementation of fast-track total hip- and knee arthroplasty.
PubMed ID
16768952 View in PubMed
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1389 records – page 1 of 139.