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Adherence of pregnant women to Nordic dietary guidelines in relation to postpartum weight retention: results from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256846
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Anne von Ruesten
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Margaretha Haugen
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Kirsten Mehlig
Anna Winkvist
Lauren Lissner
Author Affiliation
Division of Environmental Medicine, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. Anne.Lise.Brantsaeter@fhi.no.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2014;14:75
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body Weight
Diet Surveys
Diet, Reducing - psychology
Female
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Nutrition Policy
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Postpartum Period - psychology
Pregnancy
Weight Gain
Young Adult
Abstract
Pregnancy is a major life event for women and often connected with changes in diet and lifestyle and natural gestational weight gain. However, excessive weight gain during pregnancy may lead to postpartum weight retention and add to the burden of increasing obesity prevalence. Therefore, it is of interest to examine whether adherence to nutrient recommendations or food-based guidelines is associated with postpartum weight retention 6 months after birth.
This analysis is based on data from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. Diet during the first 4-5 months of pregnancy was assessed by a food-frequency questionnaire and maternal weight before pregnancy as well as in the postpartum period was assessed by questionnaires. Two Healthy Eating Index (HEI) scores were applied to measure compliance with either the official Norwegian food-based guidelines (HEI-NFG) or the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (HEI-NNR) during pregnancy. The considered outcome, i.e. weight retention 6 months after birth, was modelled in two ways: continuously (in kg) and categorically (risk of substantial postpartum weight retention, i.e. =?5% gain to pre-pregnancy weight). Associations between the HEI-NFG and HEI-NNR score with postpartum weight retention on the continuous scale were estimated by linear regression models. Relationships of both HEI scores with the categorical outcome variable were evaluated using logistic regression.
In the continuous model without adjustment for gestational weight gain (GWG), the HEI-NFG score but not the HEI-NNR score was inversely related to postpartum weight retention. However, after additional adjustment for GWG as potential intermediate the HEI-NFG score was marginally inversely and the HEI-NNR score was inversely associated with postpartum weight retention. In the categorical model, both HEI scores were inversely related with risk of substantial postpartum weight retention, independent of adjustment for GWG.
Higher adherence to either the official Norwegian food guidelines or possibly also to Nordic Nutrition Recommendations during pregnancy appears to be associated with lower postpartum weight retention.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24456804 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adherence to beta-blocker therapy under drug cost-sharing in patients with and without acute myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162000
Source
Am J Manag Care. 2007 Aug;13(8):445-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Sebastian Schneeweiss
Amanda R Patrick
Malcolm Maclure
Colin R Dormuth
Robert J Glynn
Author Affiliation
Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 1620 Tremont St (Ste 3030), Boston, MA 02120, USA. schneeweiss@post.harvard.edu
Source
Am J Manag Care. 2007 Aug;13(8):445-52
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - economics - therapeutic use
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
British Columbia
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Cost Sharing
Deductibles and Coinsurance
Diabetes Complications
Female
Health Policy - trends
Humans
Male
Medical Record Linkage
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy - economics
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Prescription Fees
Vascular Diseases
Abstract
To evaluate the effects of patient copayment and coinsurance policies on adherence to therapy with beta-adrenergic blocking agents (beta-blockers) and on the rate of initiation of beta-blocker therapy after acute myocardial infarction (MI) in a population-based natural experiment.
Three sequential cohorts included British Columbia residents age 66 years and older who initiated beta-blocker therapy during time intervals with full drug coverage (2001), a $10 or $25 copayment (2002), and 25% coinsurance (2003-2004). We used linked data on all prescription drug dispensings, physician services, and hospitalizations. Follow-up of each cohort was 9 months after the policy changes.
We measured the proportion of subjects in each cohort who were adherent to beta-blocker therapy over time, with adherence defined as having >80% of days covered. We also measured the proportion of patients initiating beta-blocker therapy after acute MI. Policy effects were evaluated using multivariable regression.
Adherence to beta-blocker therapy was marginally reduced as a consequence of the copayment policy (-1.3 percentage points, 95% confidence interval [CI] = -2.5 , -0.04) or the coinsurance policy (-0.8 percentage points, 95% CI = -2.0, 0.3). The proportion of patients initiating beta-blockers after hospitalization for acute MI remained steady at about 61% during the study period, similar to that observed in a control population of elderly Pennsylvania residents with full drug coverage.
Fixed patient copayment and coinsurance policies had little negative effect on adherence to relatively inexpensive beta-blocker therapy, or initiation of beta-blockers after acute MI.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17685825 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adherence to emergency department discharge prescriptions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152169
Source
CJEM. 2009 Mar;11(2):131-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Corinne M Hohl
Riyad B Abu-Laban
Jeffrey R Brubacher
Peter J Zed
Boris Sobolev
Gina Tsai
Patricia Kretz
Kevin Nemethy
Jan Jaap Bijlsma
Roy A Purssell
Author Affiliation
Department of Emergency Medicine, Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. chohl@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
CJEM. 2009 Mar;11(2):131-8
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia
Drug Prescriptions - standards
Emergency Service, Hospital - standards
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Guideline Adherence
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Patient Discharge - standards
Prospective Studies
Abstract
Nonadherence to prescribed medication is associated with increased morbidity and mortality as well as the increased use of health services. The main objective of our study was to assess the incidence of prescription-filling and medication adherence in patients discharged from the emergency department (ED).
This was a prospective, observational study carried out at a Canadian tertiary care ED with an annual census of 69 000. We enrolled a convenience sample of patients being discharged with a prescription. We queried a provincial prescription-dispensing database 2 weeks later to determine whether prescriptions had been filled. We used a standardized follow-up interview to assess adherence and whether or not the patient experienced an adverse drug-related event (ADRE) or an unplanned revisit to an ED or clinic.
Of the 301 patients who agreed to participate, follow-up was successful for 258 (85.7%). Fifty-one patients (19.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 15.4%-25.1%) failed to fill their discharge prescriptions and 104 (40.3%, 95% CI 34.5%-46.4%) did not adhere to 1 or more medications. Antibiotics were associated with a lower odds ratio (OR) of nonadherence (OR 0.21, 95% CI 0.08-0.52). There was a trend toward increasing nonadherence in patients who reported an ADRE (OR 1.84, 95% CI 0.98-3.48) or had 2 or more medications coprescribed (OR 1.71, 95% CI 0.95-3.09). There was also a trend toward a higher risk of a revisit to an ED or clinic in nonadherent patients (OR 1.75, 95% CI 0.94-3.25).
Approximately 4 in 10 patients discharged from the ED did not adhere to his or her prescribed medication. Our results suggest that patients who are prescribed antibiotics are more likely to be adherent, and that further evaluation of the associations between nonadherence, ADREs, the coprescription of 2 or more medications and the use of health services is warranted.
PubMed ID
19272214 View in PubMed
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Adherence to health regimens among frequent attenders of Finnish healthcare.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature280267
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016;75:30726
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Sari Hirsikangas
Outi Kanste
Juha Korpelainen
Helvi Kyngäs
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016;75:30726
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland
Health Services Misuse - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Medication Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Office visits - statistics & numerical data
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Risk assessment
Self Care - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Abstract
The aim of the study was to describe adherence to health regimens and the factors associated with it among adult frequent attenders (FAs).
This was a cross-sectional study. The study sample consisted of 462 healthcare FAs in 7 municipal health centres in northern Finland. An FA is a person who has had 8 or more outpatient visits to a GP (in a health centre) or 4 or more outpatient visits to a university hospital during 1 year. The main outcome was self-reported adherence to health regimens.
Of the FAs, 82% adhered well to their health regimens. Carrying out self-care, medical care and feeling responsible for self-care were the most significant predictors to good adherence in all models. No significant differences in adherence were found in male and female subjects, age groups or educational levels. Support from healthcare providers and support from relatives were not significant predictors of good adherence.
FAs in Finland adhere well to health regimens and exceptionally well to medication. Variables that predict the best adherence of FAs to health regimens are carrying out self-care, receiving medical care and feeling responsible for self-care.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26996780 View in PubMed
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Adherence to lipid-lowering drug therapy among members of the Canadian Forces.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155689
Source
Mil Med. 2008 Jul;173(7):666-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Janice Ma
Régis Vaillancourt
Carol Bennett
Author Affiliation
Directorate of Medical Policy, Pharmacy Policies and Standards, National Defence Medical Centre Building, 2nd Floor, 1745 Alta Vista Drive, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0K6, Canada.
Source
Mil Med. 2008 Jul;173(7):666-70
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Databases as Topic
Female
Humans
Hyperlipidemias - drug therapy
Hypolipidemic Agents - therapeutic use
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Military Medicine
Military Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Abstract
This study was performed to quantify adherence rates to lipid-lowering drug therapy among members of the Canadian Forces (CF) and to identify factors associated with nonadherence.
Pharmacy claims were reviewed for all CF members who received a lipid-lowering drug between April 1 and June 1, 2003. Subjects were categorized as adherent if records indicated consumption of at least 80% of prescribed doses. Logistic regression was performed to assess the impact of patient and drug characteristics upon adherence.
Overall adherence rate at 1 year was 38.5% among all users of lipid-lowering medications. Adherence did not vary among the different classes of lipid-lowering drugs. Duration of service was the only independent predictor of adherence.
Despite a relative lack of treatment barriers and the presence of established treatment programs in the CF health care system, long-term adherence with lipid-lowering medications remains suboptimal in this population.
Notes
Comment In: Mil Med. 2008 Jul;173(7):iii18700588
PubMed ID
18700601 View in PubMed
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Adherence to special diets and its association with meeting the nutrient recommendations in individuals with type 1 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294978
Source
Acta Diabetol. 2018 Aug; 55(8):843-851
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2018
Author
A J Ahola
C Forsblom
Per-Henrik Groop
Author Affiliation
Folkhälsan Institute of Genetics, Folkhälsan Research Center, University of Helsinki, Biomedicum Helsinki C318b, PO Box 63, 00014, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Acta Diabetol. 2018 Aug; 55(8):843-851
Date
Aug-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - diet therapy - epidemiology
Diet - methods - statistics & numerical data
Diet Records
Diet, Diabetic - standards - statistics & numerical data
Energy Intake - physiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Not much is known about adherence to special diets in type 1 diabetes, characteristics of individuals with special diets, and whether such practices should raise concerns with respect to meeting the dietary recommendations. In this study, we assessed the frequencies of adherence to special diets, in a population of individuals with type 1 diabetes, and investigated the association between special diet adherence and dietary intake, measured as dietary patterns and nutrient intakes.
During the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy Study visit, participants with type 1 diabetes (n?=?1429) were instructed to complete a diet questionnaire inquiring about the adherence to special diets. The participants also completed a food record, from which energy and nutrient intakes were calculated.
In all, 36.6% participants reported adhering to some special diet. Most commonly reported special diets were lactose-free (17.1%), protein restriction (10.0%), vegetarian (7.0%), and gluten-free (5.6%) diet. Special diet adherents were more frequently women, older, had longer diabetes duration, and more frequently had various diabetes complications. Mean carbohydrate intakes were close to the lower levels of the recommendation in all diet groups, which was reflected in low mean fibre intakes but high frequencies of meeting the sucrose recommendations. The recommendation for saturated fatty acid intake was frequently unmet, with the highest frequencies observed in vegetarians. Of the micronutrients, vitamin D, folate, and iron recommendations were most frequently unmet, with some differences between the diet groups.
Special diets are frequently followed by individuals with type 1 diabetes. The adherents are more frequently women, and have longer diabetes duration and more diabetes complications. Achieving the dietary recommendations differed between diets, and depended on the nutrient in question. Overall, intakes of fibre, vitamin D, folate, and iron fell short of the recommendations.
PubMed ID
29777369 View in PubMed
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Adherence to statins, beta-blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors following a first cardiovascular event: a retrospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174577
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 May 1;21(6):485-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2005
Author
David F Blackburn
Roy T Dobson
James L Blackburn
Thomas W Wilson
Mary Rose Stang
William M Semchuk
Author Affiliation
College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. d.blackburn@usask.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 May 1;21(6):485-8
Date
May-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Age Factors
Angina, Unstable - drug therapy
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Coronary Artery Bypass
Databases as Topic
Drug Prescriptions - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Saskatchewan
Severity of Illness Index
Time Factors
Abstract
Population studies of statin adherence are generally restricted to one to two years of follow-up and do not analyze adherence to other drugs.
To report long-term adherence rates for statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and beta-blockers in patients who recently experienced a first cardiovascular event.
Linked administrative databases in the province of Saskatchewan were used in this retrospective cohort study. Eligible patients received a new statin prescription within one year of their first cardiovascular event between 1994 and 2001. Adherence to statins, beta-blockers and ACE inhibitors was assessed from the first statin prescription to a subsequent cardiovascular event.
Of 1221 eligible patients, the proportion of patients adherent to statin medications dropped to 60.3% at one year and 48.8% at five years. The decline in the proportion of adherent patients was most notable during the first two years (100% to 53.7%). Several factors were associated with statin adherence, including age (P = 0.012), number of physician service days (P = 0.037), chronic disease score (P = 0.032), beta-blocker adherence (P
PubMed ID
15917876 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adherence to statin therapy under drug cost sharing in patients with and without acute myocardial infarction: a population-based natural experiment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164224
Source
Circulation. 2007 Apr 24;115(16):2128-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-24-2007
Author
Sebastian Schneeweiss
Amanda R Patrick
Malcolm Maclure
Colin R Dormuth
Robert J Glynn
Author Affiliation
Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 1620 Tremont St, Suite 3030, Boston, MA 02120, USA. schneeweiss@post.harvard.edu
Source
Circulation. 2007 Apr 24;115(16):2128-35
Date
Apr-24-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
British Columbia
Cohort Studies
Cost Sharing - economics - statistics & numerical data
Deductibles and Coinsurance - economics - statistics & numerical data
Drug Costs
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - economics - therapeutic use
Insurance Coverage - economics - statistics & numerical data
Insurance, Pharmaceutical Services - classification - economics - statistics & numerical data
Male
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy
National Health Programs - economics - statistics & numerical data
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
As medication spending grows, Medicare Part D will need to adapt its coverage policies according to emerging evidence from a variety of insurance policies. We sought to evaluate the consequences of copayment and coinsurance policies on the initiation of statin therapy after acute myocardial infarction and adherence to therapy in statin initiators using a natural experiment of all British Columbia residents aged 66 years and older.
Three consecutive cohorts that included all patients who began statin therapy during full drug coverage (2001), coverage with a $10 or $25 copay (2002), and coverage with a 25% coinsurance benefit (2003-2004) were followed up with linked healthcare utilization data (n=51,561). Follow-up of cohorts was 9 months after each policy change. Adherence to statin therapy was defined as > or = 80% of days covered. Relative to full-coverage policies, adherence to new statin therapy was significantly reduced, from 55.8% to 50.5%, under a fixed copayment policy (-5.4% points; 95% CI, -6.4% to -4.4%) and the subsequent coinsurance policy (-5.4% points; 95% CI, -6.3% to -4.4%). An uninterrupted increase in the proportion of patients initiating statin therapy after an acute myocardial infarction (1.7% points per quarter) was observed over the study period, similar to a Pennsylvania control population with full coverage. Sudden changes to full out-of-pocket spending, similar to Medicare's Part D "doughnut hole," almost doubled the risk of stopping statins (adjusted odds ratio, 1.94, 95% CI, 1.82 to 2.08).
Fixed patient copayment and coinsurance policies have negative effects on adherence to statin lipid-lowering drug therapy but not on their initiation after myocardial infarction.
PubMed ID
17420348 View in PubMed
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Adherence to the cervical cancer screening program in women living with HIV in Denmark: comparison with the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259332
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2014;14:256
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Kristina Thorsteinsson
Steen Ladelund
Søren Jensen-Fangel
Terese L Katzenstein
Isik Somuncu Johansen
Gitte Pedersen
Jette Junge
Marie Helleberg
Merete Storgaard
Anne-Mette Lebech
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2014;14:256
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
Early Detection of Cancer
Female
HIV Infections
Humans
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis
Vaginal Smears - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Women living with HIV (WLWH) are at increased risk of invasive cervical cancer (ICC). International HIV guidelines suggest cervical screening twice the first year after HIV diagnosis and thereafter annually. Adherence to the HIV cervical screening program in Denmark is unknown.
We studied women from a population-based, nationwide HIV cohort in Denmark and a cohort of age-matched females from the general population. Screening behaviour was assessed from 1999-2010. Adjusted odds ratios (OR's) for screening attendance in the two cohorts and potential predictors of attendance to guidelines were estimated. Pathology specimens were identified from The Danish Pathology Data Bank.
We followed 1143 WLWH and 17,145 controls with no prior history of ICC for 9,509 and 157,362 person-years. The first year after HIV diagnosis 2.6% of WLWH obtained the recommended two cervical cytologies. During the different calendar intervals throughout the study period between 29-46% of WLWH followed the HIV cervical screening guidelines. Adjusted OR's of attendance to the general population screening program for WLWH aged 30, 40 and 50 years, compared to controls, were 0.69 (95% CI: 0.56-0.87), 0.67 (0.55-0.80) and 0.84 (0.61-1.15). Predictors of attendance to the HIV cervical screening program were a CD4 count?>?350 cells/µL and HIV RNA?
Notes
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PubMed ID
24885577 View in PubMed
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Adherence to the Danish food-based dietary guidelines and risk of myocardial infarction: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299380
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2018 05; 21(7):1286-1296
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-2018
Author
Camilla Plambeck Hansen
Kim Overvad
Inge Tetens
Anne Tjønneland
Erik Thorlund Parner
Marianne Uhre Jakobsen
Christina Catherine Dahm
Author Affiliation
1Section for Epidemiology,Department of Public Health,Aarhus University,Bartholins Allé 2,DK-8000 Aarhus C,Denmark.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2018 05; 21(7):1286-1296
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology
Nutrition Policy
Nutritive Value
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A direct way to evaluate food-based dietary guidelines is to assess if adherence is associated with development of non-communicable diseases. Thus, the objective was to develop an index to assess adherence to the 2013 Danish food-based dietary guidelines and to investigate the association between adherence to the index and risk of myocardial infarction (MI).
Population-based cohort study with recruitment of participants in 1993-1997. Information on dietary intake was collected at baseline using an FFQ and an index ranging from 0 to 6 points was created to assess adherence to the 2013 Danish food-based dietary guidelines. MI cases were identified by record linkage to the Danish National Patient Register and the Causes of Death Register. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) of MI.
Greater areas of Aarhus and Copenhagen, Denmark.
Men and women aged 50-64 years (n 55 021) from the Diet, Cancer and Health study.
A total of 3046 participants were diagnosed with first-time MI during a median follow-up of 16·9 years. A higher Danish Dietary Guidelines Index score was associated with a lower risk of MI. After adjustment for potential confounders, the hazard of MI was 13 % lower among men with a score of 3-
PubMed ID
29331164 View in PubMed
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