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An examination of the difference in performance of self-care behaviours between white and non-white patients following CABG surgery: a secondary analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138747
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2010;20(4):21-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Suzanne Fredericks
Joyce Lo
Sarah Ibrahim
Jennifer Leung
Author Affiliation
Daphne Cockwell School of Nursing, Ryerson University, Toronto, ON. sfrederi@ryerson.ca
Source
Can J Cardiovasc Nurs. 2010;20(4):21-9
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
China - ethnology
Coronary Artery Bypass - nursing - psychology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
European Continental Ancestry Group - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
India - ethnology
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Methodology Research
Ontario
Patient Compliance - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Patient Discharge
Patient Education as Topic
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Self Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The demographic profile of the patient receiving coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery in Canada has changed significantly over the past 20 years from mainly white (i.e., English, Irish, Scottish) to non-white (i.e., Indian or Chinese). To support individuals who have recently undergone a CABG procedure, patient education is provided to guide performance of self-care behaviours in the home environment. The relevance of this education, when applied to the current CABG surgery population, is questionable, as it was designed and tested using a white, homogenous sample. Thus, the number and type of self-care behaviours performed by persons of Indian and Chinese origin has not been investigated. These individuals may have varying self-care needs that are not reflected in the current self-care patient education materials.
The intent of this study was to examine the difference in the type and number of self-care behaviours performed between white and non-white patients following CABG surgery.
This study is a sub-study of a descriptive, exploratory design that included a convenience sample. Ninety-nine patients were recruited, representing three cultural groups (White, Indian, and Chinese). Descriptive data were used to describe the sample and identify specific self-care behaviours performed in the home environment.
Results indicate statistically significant differences between white and non-white individuals related to use of incentive spirometer (p = 0.04), deep breathing and coughing exercises (p = 0.04), and activity modification (p
PubMed ID
21141231 View in PubMed
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Associations among 25-year trends in diet, cholesterol and BMI from 140,000 observations in men and women in Northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123566
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Ingegerd Johansson
Lena Maria Nilsson
Birgitta Stegmayr
Kurt Boman
Göran Hallmans
Anna Winkvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Odontology, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden. ingegerd.johansson@odont.umu.se
Source
Nutr J. 2012;11:40
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - trends
Body mass index
Cholesterol - blood
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet Surveys
Diet, Carbohydrate-Restricted - adverse effects
Diet, High-Fat - adverse effects
Diet, Reducing - adverse effects - trends
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Mass Media - trends
Middle Aged
Patient Compliance - ethnology
Sex Characteristics
Sweden
Weight Gain
Abstract
In the 1970s, men in northern Sweden had among the highest prevalences of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) worldwide. An intervention program combining population- and individual-oriented activities was initiated in 1985. Concurrently, collection of information on medical risk factors, lifestyle and anthropometry started. Today, these data make up one of the largest databases in the world on diet intake in a population-based sample, both in terms of sample size and follow-up period. The study examines trends in food and nutrient intake, serum cholesterol and body mass index (BMI) from 1986 to 2010 in northern Sweden.
Cross-sectional information on self-reported food and nutrient intake and measured body weight, height, and serum cholesterol were compiled for over 140,000 observations. Trends and trend breaks over the 25-year period were evaluated for energy-providing nutrients, foods contributing to fat intake, serum cholesterol and BMI.
Reported intake of fat exhibited two significant trend breaks in both sexes: a decrease between 1986 and 1992 and an increase from 2002 (women) or 2004 (men). A reverse trend was noted for carbohydrates, whereas protein intake remained unchanged during the 25-year period. Significant trend breaks in intake of foods contributing to total fat intake were seen. Reported intake of wine increased sharply for both sexes (more so for women) and export beer increased for men. BMI increased continuously for both sexes, whereas serum cholesterol levels decreased during 1986 - 2004, remained unchanged until 2007 and then began to rise. The increase in serum cholesterol coincided with the increase in fat intake, especially with intake of saturated fat and fats for spreading on bread and cooking.
Men and women in northern Sweden decreased their reported fat intake in the first 7 years (1986-1992) of an intervention program. After 2004 fat intake increased sharply for both genders, which coincided with introduction of a positive media support for low carbohydrate-high-fat (LCHF) diet. The decrease and following increase in cholesterol levels occurred simultaneously with the time trends in food selection, whereas a constant increase in BMI remained unaltered. These changes in risk factors may have important effects on primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD).
Notes
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PubMed ID
22686621 View in PubMed
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Associations between sociocultural home environmental factors and vegetable consumption among Norwegian 3-5-year olds: BRA-study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291600
Source
Appetite. 2017 Oct 01; 117:310-320
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-01-2017
Author
Anne Lene Kristiansen
Mona Bjelland
Anne Himberg-Sundet
Nanna Lien
Lene Frost Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, PO Box 1046 Blindern, 0316 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: a.l.kristiansen@medisin.uio.no.
Source
Appetite. 2017 Oct 01; 117:310-320
Date
Oct-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena - ethnology
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Family Characteristics - ethnology
Female
Fruit
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Healthy Diet - ethnology
Humans
Male
Norway
Nutrition Surveys
Parenting - ethnology
Parents
Patient Compliance - ethnology
Principal Component Analysis
Self Report
Socioeconomic Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
The home environment is the first environment to shape childhood dietary habits and food preferences, hence greater understanding of home environmental factors associated with vegetable consumption among young children is needed. The objective has been to examine questionnaire items developed to measure the sociocultural home environment of children focusing on vegetables and to assess the psychometric properties of the resulting factors. Further, to explore associations between the environmental factors and vegetable consumption among Norwegian 3-5 year olds. Parents (n 633) were invited to participate and filled in a questionnaire assessing the child's vegetable intake and factors potentially influencing this, along with a 24-h recall of their child's fruit and vegetable intake. Children's fruit and vegetable intakes at two meals in one day in the kindergarten were observed by researchers. Principal components analysis was used to examine items assessing the sociocultural home environment. Encouragement items resulted in factors labelled "reactive encouragement", "child involvement" and "reward". Modelling items resulted in the factors labelled "active role model" and "practical role model". Items assessing negative parental attitudes resulted in the factor labelled "negative parental attitudes" and items assessing family pressure/demand resulted in the factor labelled "family demand". The psychometric properties of the factors were for most satisfactory. Linear regression of the associations between vegetable intake and the factors showed, as expected, generally positive associations with "child involvement", "practical role model" and "family demand", and negative associations with "negative parental attitudes" and "reward". Unexpectedly, "reactive encouragement" was negatively associated with vegetable consumption. In conclusion, associations between sociocultural home environmental factors and children's vegetable consumption showed both expected and unexpected associations some of which differed by maternal education - pointing to a need for further comparable studies.
PubMed ID
28676449 View in PubMed
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Attitudes to compliance with tuberculosis treatment among women and men in Vietnam.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52539
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 1999 Oct;3(10):862-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
E. Johansson
N H Long
V K Diwan
A. Winkvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. eva.johansson@phs.ki.se
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 1999 Oct;3(10):862-8
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antitubercular Agents - therapeutic use
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Comparative Study
Costs and Cost Analysis
Female
Focus Groups - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Compliance - ethnology - psychology
Prejudice
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - drug therapy - economics - ethnology - psychology
Vietnam - epidemiology
Abstract
SETTING: A study carried out in 1996 in four districts representing south and north as well as urban and rural areas of Vietnam. OBJECTIVE: To explore gender differences in knowledge, beliefs and attitudes towards tuberculosis and its treatment, and how these factors influence patients' compliance with treatment. DESIGN: Sixteen focus group discussions were performed by a multi-disciplinary research team from Vietnam and Sweden. Analysis was performed using modified Grounded Theory technique, specifically evaluating gender differences. RESULTS: Women were believed to be more compliant than men. Insufficient knowledge and individual cost during treatment were reported as main obstacles to compliance among men (poor patient compliance), while sensitivity to interaction with health staff and stigma in society (poor health staff and system compliance) were reported as the main obstacles among women. CONCLUSIONS: It is time to adopt a more comprehensive and gender-sensitive approach to compliance, which incorporates patient compliance, doctor compliance and system compliance, in order to fully support individual patients in their efforts to comply with treatment.
PubMed ID
10524582 View in PubMed
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Attribute importance segmentation of Norwegian seafood consumers: The inclusion of salient packaging attributes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291603
Source
Appetite. 2017 Oct 01; 117:214-223
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
Oct-01-2017
Author
Svein Ottar Olsen
Ho Huu Tuu
Klaus G Grunert
Author Affiliation
School of Business and Economics, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway. Electronic address: svein.o.olsen@uit.no.
Source
Appetite. 2017 Oct 01; 117:214-223
Date
Oct-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Adult
Cluster analysis
Consumer Behavior - economics
Cookbooks as Topic - economics
Cooking - economics
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Food Packaging - economics
Food Preferences - ethnology
Food Quality
Food, Preserved - adverse effects - economics
Healthy Diet - economics - ethnology - psychology
Humans
Internet
Male
Meals - ethnology
Models, Psychological
Norway
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritive Value
Patient Compliance - ethnology
Seafood - adverse effects - economics
Abstract
The main purpose of this study is to identify consumer segments based on the importance of product attributes when buying seafood for homemade meals on weekdays. There is a particular focus on the relative importance of the packaging attributes of fresh seafood. The results are based on a representative survey of 840 Norwegian consumers between 18 and 80 years of age. This study found that taste, freshness, nutritional value and naturalness are the most important attributes for the home consumption of seafood. Except for the high importance of information about expiration date, most other packaging attributes have only medium importance. Three consumer segments are identified based on the importance of 33 attributes associated with seafood: Perfectionists, Quality Conscious and Careless Consumers. The Quality Conscious consumers feel more self-confident in their evaluation of quality, and are less concerned with packaging, branding, convenience and emotional benefits compared to the Perfectionists. Careless Consumers are important as regular consumers of convenient and pre-packed seafood products and value recipe information on the packaging. The seafood industry may use the results provided in this study to strengthen their positioning of seafood across three different consumer segments.
PubMed ID
28669742 View in PubMed
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Barriers to HIV care: an exploration of the complexities that influence engagement in and utilization of treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139011
Source
Soc Work Health Care. 2010;49(10):934-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Mary A Cavaleri
Kosta Kalogerogiannis
Mary M McKay
Laura Vitale
Erika Levi
Sian Jones
Fran Wallach
Erin Flynn
Author Affiliation
New York State Psychiatric Institute, 100 Haven Avenue #31D, New York, NY 10032, USA. cavaleri@pi.cpmc.columbia.edu
Source
Soc Work Health Care. 2010;49(10):934-45
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
African Americans - psychology
Ambulatory Care - utilization
Comorbidity
Female
HIV Infections - ethnology - psychology - therapy
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Services Accessibility
Hispanic Americans - psychology
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
New York City - epidemiology
Patient Compliance - ethnology - psychology
Poverty
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Urban Population
Abstract
This study is an exploration of engagement in outpatient medical care, medication utilization, and barriers to treatment utilization among 24 predominantly low-income, ethnic minority adults who were admitted to an urban hospital for HIV-related illnesses. A semi-structured interview was administered during the sample's hospital stay to explore patterns of service use and identify barriers to care. The majority of the sample was connected to an outpatient provider and satisfied with the care they received; however, most missed treatment appointments and skipped medication dosages. Health and treatment-related barriers, competing demands, and co-occurring mental health symptoms and illicit substance use were identified as barriers to care. Multiple obstacles indigenous to the individual, their treatment, and the environment prevented consistent treatment use among an economically disadvantaged ethnic minority sample: Implications and future directions in engaging vulnerable populations into health care for HIV are discussed.
PubMed ID
21113849 View in PubMed
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Chinese and white Canadian satisfaction and compliance with physicians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164517
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2007;8:11
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Richard Liu
Lawrence So
Hude Quan
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Canada. ryliu@ualberta.ca
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2007;8:11
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alberta - epidemiology
Asian Americans - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Emigration and Immigration - classification - statistics & numerical data
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Compliance - ethnology
Patient Satisfaction - ethnology
Population Surveillance
Primary Health Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Patient satisfaction has become an important indicator of primary care and healthcare system performance. Ethnic disparities in patient satisfaction and compliance with physician care have been studied in several countries. However, this issue has not received significant attention in Canada. The unique characteristics of the Canadian healthcare system and ethnic population make it worthwhile to examine this issue in this population. Therefore, we conducted a survey among Chinese and Whites in a Canadian city to determine their reported satisfaction, and perceptions of physicians.
The survey was conducted in English, Mandarin and Cantonese in 2005 among Chinese and White Canadians, 18 years of age or older, who had visited at least one physician in Canada.
We analyzed 746 Chinese and 711 Whites in the general practitioner (GP) visit group and 485 Chinese and 637 Whites in the specialist visit group. A lower proportion of Chinese compared to Whites reported that they were very satisfied or satisfied with GP (73.7% vs. 92.8%) and specialist care (75.5% vs. 85.6%) and the differences between the two groups remained after adjustment for demographic variables and chronic conditions (risk adjusted OR: 0.70, 95%CI: 0.42-1.18 for the GP visit group and OR: 0.77, 95%CI: 0.48-1.23 for the specialist visit group). A similar proportion of Chinese and Whites reported that they always followed a physician's advice (59.4% vs. 59.6% for the GP visit group and 67.2% vs. 62.8% for the specialist visit group). Non-English speaking Chinese and recent arrivals in Canada were less likely to be satisfied with GPs than Chinese born in Canada [risk adjusted OR: 0.5, 95%CI: 0.3-0.9, 0.2 and 0.1-0.7, respectively].
Chinese Canadians reported lower satisfaction with physicians and perceived physicians slightly more negatively than White Canadians. Particularly, Chinese with limited English and short length of stay in Canada were less satisfied than Canadian born Chinese.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17376235 View in PubMed
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Clinical characteristics, modalities and complications of diabetic patients with migration background at a Central European University Clinic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136633
Source
Wien Med Wochenschr. 2011 Mar;161(5-6):128-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Ammon Handisurya
Dagmar Bancher-Todesca
Majid Reza Kamyar
Rosa Lemmens-Gruber
Alexandra Kautzky-Willer
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology and Dialysis, Department of Internal Medicine III, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
Source
Wien Med Wochenschr. 2011 Mar;161(5-6):128-35
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - ethnology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - epidemiology - ethnology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - ethnology
Diabetes, Gestational - epidemiology - ethnology
Emigrants and Immigrants - statistics & numerical data
Female
Germany
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - analysis
Hospitals, University
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Patient Compliance - ethnology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology - ethnology
Pregnancy in Diabetics - epidemiology - ethnology
Risk factors
Abstract
The objective of the present study was to assess (i) the effects of immigration on the outcome of 200 consecutive singleton pregnancies in women with overt diabetes as well as (ii) gender-specific differences in cardiovascular risk factor profile and the achievement of therapeutic targets in type 2 diabetic subjects with migration background (n = 50). In pregnant subjects, baseline characteristics at admission, pregnancy outcome and the rate of obstetrical complications were similar in immigrant and non-immigrant women. Type 2 diabetes and also preconceptionally undiagnosed diabetes were significantly more frequent in women with migration background. Following delivery, immigrants presented with a worse metabolic profile, including higher triglyceride and nonHDL levels, than the indigenous population. Furthermore, within diabetic subjects with a migration background, non-pregnant women feature a more adverse cardiovascular risk factor profile than men. However, no gender-specific differences in the total adherence to clinical recommendations according to clinical recommendations have been found.
PubMed ID
21360290 View in PubMed
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Determinants of meal satisfaction in a workplace environment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287710
Source
Appetite. 2016 Oct 01;105:195-203
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-01-2016
Author
Pernille Haugaard
Catalin M Stancu
Per B Brockhoff
Inga Thorsdottir
Liisa Lähteenmäki
Source
Appetite. 2016 Oct 01;105:195-203
Date
Oct-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Agriculture - manpower
Consumer Behavior
Denmark
Energy Intake - ethnology
Female
Food Quality
Food Services
Healthy Diet - economics - ethnology - psychology
Humans
Lunch - ethnology - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Mindfulness
Models, Psychological
Patient Compliance - ethnology - psychology
Satiety Response
Stress, Psychological - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Technology Transfer
Workplace - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
Workplace lunches are recurrent meal occasions that can contribute to the general well-being of employees. The objective of our research was to study which factors influence consumers' satisfaction with these meals by exploring the relative role of food-related, personal, situational factors. Using a longitudinal approach, we monitored a total of 71 participants compiled and experienced 519 meals from their workplace canteen buffet during a three-month period; in addition the composed lunches were photographed. Before and after the lunch choice period respondents filled in a questionnaire on several meal-related variables. A mixed modelling approach was used to analyse the data. Meal satisfaction was directly associated with a positive ambience and a positive evaluation of both the quality of the food eaten and the buffet assortment, whereas the meal's energy content did not contribute to meal satisfaction. Additionally, meal satisfaction was associated with a more positive mood, lower hunger level as well as feeling less busy and stressed after lunch. The buffet assortment, a more positive mood before lunch and mindful eating contributed to the perceived food quality, but not associated with the hunger level before lunch. Time available, mindful eating and eating with close colleagues were positively associated with perceived ambience. The results indicate that consumers' satisfaction with workplace meals can be increased by putting emphasis on the quality of food served, but equally important is the ambience in the lunch situation. Most of the ambience factors were related to available time and mental resources of the participants and the possibility to share the meal with close colleagues. These are factors that can be facilitated by the service provider, but not directly influenced.
PubMed ID
27235825 View in PubMed
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Dietary intake and biomarker status of folate in Swedish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294851
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2018 Mar; 57(2):451-462
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2018
Author
Veronica Öhrvik
Eva Warensjö Lemming
Cecilia Nälsén
Wulf Becker
Peter Ridefelt
Anna Karin Lindroos
Author Affiliation
Science Department, National Food Agency, Box 622, 751 26, Uppsala, Sweden. Veronica.Ohrvik@slv.se.
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2018 Mar; 57(2):451-462
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Biomarkers - blood - metabolism
Diet - adverse effects - ethnology - trends
Dietary Supplements
Erythrocytes - metabolism
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Folic Acid - blood - metabolism - therapeutic use
Folic Acid Deficiency - epidemiology - ethnology - prevention & control
Healthy Diet - ethnology
Humans
Male
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena - ethnology
Middle Aged
Neural Tube Defects - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology - prevention & control
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status - ethnology
Patient Compliance - ethnology
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
National data on folate status are missing in Sweden, and regional data indicate folate insufficiency in up to more than 25% of the study populations. The objectives were to determine folate intake and status in the adult Swedish population as well as identifying dietary patterns associated with beneficial folate status.
Folate intake was estimated using a web-based 4-d food record in adults aged 18-80 years (n = 1797). Folate status was measured as erythrocyte (n = 282) and plasma folate concentrations (n = 294). Factor analysis was used to derive a dietary pattern associated with a higher folate status.
Median folate intake was 246 µg/day (Q 1 = 196, Q 3 = 304, n = 1797) and for women of reproductive age 227 µg/day (Q 1 = 181, Q 3 = 282, n = 450). As dietary folate equivalents (DFE), median intake was 257 µg/day (Q 1 = 201, Q 3 = 323) and for women of reproductive age 239 µg/day (Q 1 = 185, Q 3 = 300). Low blood folate concentrations were found in 2% (erythrocyte concentrations 
Notes
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PubMed ID
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