Skip header and navigation

Refine By

   MORE

9 records – page 1 of 1.

Care partnerships between family physicians and rheumatologists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133685
Source
J Rheumatol. 2011 Sep;38(9):1981-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Benjamin Lou
Mirella DE Civita
Debbie Ehrmann Feldman
Asvina Bissonauth
Sasha Bernatsky
Author Affiliation
Montreal General Hospital, Clinical Epidemiology, 1650 Cedar Ave., L10-424, Montreal H3G 1A4, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Rheumatol. 2011 Sep;38(9):1981-5
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Family Practice - organization & administration - trends
Female
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Male
National Health Programs - organization & administration - trends
Partnership Practice - organization & administration - trends
Patient Care Team - organization & administration - trends
Physician's Practice Patterns - organization & administration - trends
Quality of Health Care - trends
Quebec
Questionnaires - standards
Referral and Consultation - organization & administration - trends
Rheumatology - organization & administration - trends
Abstract
To describe care partnerships between family physicians and rheumatologists.
A random sample (20%, n = 478) of family physicians was mailed a questionnaire, asking if there was at least 1 particular rheumatologist to whom the physician tended to refer patients. If the answer was affirmative, the physician would be considered as having a "care partnership" with that rheumatologist. The family physician then rated, on a 5-point scale, factors of importance regarding the relationship with that rheumatologist.
The questionnaire was completed by 84/462 (18.2%) of family physicians; 52/84 (61.9%) reported having rheumatology care partnerships according to our definition. Regarding interactions with rheumatologists, most respondents rated the following as important (score = 4): adequate communication and information exchange (44/50, 88.0%); waiting time for new patients (40/50, 80.0%); clear and appropriate balance of responsibilities (39/49, 79.6%); and patient feedback and preferences (34/50, 68%). Male family physicians were more likely than females to accord high importance to personal knowledge of the rheumatologist, and to physical proximity of the rheumatologist's practice. Regarding relationships with rheumatologists, 30/50 (60.0%) of respondents felt communication and information exchange were adequate, and 35/50 (70.0%) felt they had a clear balance of responsibilities.
Almost two-thirds of family physicians have rheumatology care partnerships, according to our definition. In this partnership, establishing adequate communication and shorter waiting time seem of paramount importance to family physicians. A balanced sharing of responsibilities and patients' preferences are also valued. Although many physicians reported adequate communication and clear and appropriate balance of responsibilities in their current interactions with rheumatologists, there appears to be room for improvement.
PubMed ID
21677002 View in PubMed
Less detail

Changing structure and resources in a rheumatology combined unit during 1977-1999.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77822
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2007 Mar-Apr;36(2):125-35
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kvalvik A G
Larsen S.
Aadland H A
Høyeraal H M
Author Affiliation
Haugesund Rheumatism Hospital. Haugesund.
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2007 Mar-Apr;36(2):125-35
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care
Hospitals, Special - organization & administration
Humans
Inpatients
Length of Stay - trends
Norway
Patient Care - methods - trends
Patient Care Team - organization & administration - trends
Retrospective Studies
Rheumatic Diseases - therapy
Rheumatology - methods - organization & administration
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim was to study the changing structure and resources in a rheumatism hospital during the period 1977-1999 when rheumatology care was decentralized and new treatment strategies were introduced. METHODS: Data on hospital management and production were retrieved retrospectively. RESULTS: The number of beds was stepwise reduced from 133 to 44 and the average length of stay declined from 48 to 16 days. The combined unit and multidisciplinary team organization was kept, ensuring the combined effort of rheumatologists, rheumasurgeons, registered nurses, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, and social workers. One-third of the total staff was rheumateam members in 1977 compared to one-half in 1999. The proportions of physicians and registered nurses increased while the proportion of physiotherapists was stable. The number of discharges remained relatively unchanged and the number of outpatient consultations increased. Inflammatory rheumatic diseases remained the largest diagnostic group of in- and outpatients. Hospitalized care was received primarily by patients with arthritis and spondylitis. Patients with vasculitis and diffuse disorders of connective tissue accounted for an increasing proportion of the outpatient clinic production. Surgical procedures became more prevalent. Since 1995 approximately 50 large joint replacements have been performed annually. CONCLUSION: The length of stay declined and patient care was shifted towards the outpatient clinic. The multidisciplinary team was strengthened. More resources were dedicated to physician-led and nurse-dependent procedures, but physiotherapy and rehabilitation remained part of inpatient care throughout the period. The expertise concentrated on inflammatory rheumatic disorders. The modesty of the large joint replacement caseload may challenge decentralized care.
PubMed ID
17476619 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Habilitation of children--an expanding discipline]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32209
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Mar 20;121(8):965-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-2001
Author
F F Sommer
Author Affiliation
Seksjon for habilitering Barneavdelingen Sentralsykehuset i Akershus 1474 Nordbyhagen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Mar 20;121(8):965-8
Date
Mar-20-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Health Services - organization & administration - trends
Community Health Services - organization & administration - trends
Counseling
Disabled Children - psychology - rehabilitation
English Abstract
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Norway
Patient Care Team - organization & administration - trends
Pediatrics - organization & administration - trends
Practice Guidelines
Research
Abstract
Children with mental or physical disabilities require both general and specialised medical care. Since the separate health care system for mentally disabled people was closed down in Norway in 1991, new acts of parliament, parliamentary documents and guidelines have focused on improving the medical, educational and social services for this group. This article describes the organisation and some of the tools used in an interdisciplinary model. The challenge for us as health workers is to utilise the new diagnostic tools and the new treatment options. Working alongside other professions, our aim is to optimise the care and conditions of disabled children and their families, helping them closer to the goal: an independent life based on self-determination.
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 May 20;121(13):163711446057
PubMed ID
11332389 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Improved treatment of diabetic foot problems]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47711
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Jun 4;163(23):3212-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-4-2001

Pharmacist's identity development within multidisciplinary primary health care teams in Ontario; qualitative results from the IMPACT project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146919
Source
Res Social Adm Pharm. 2009 Dec;5(4):319-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Kevin Pottie
Susan Haydt
Barbara Farrell
Natalie Kennie
Connie Sellors
Carmel Martin
Lisa Dolovich
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5, Canada.
Source
Res Social Adm Pharm. 2009 Dec;5(4):319-26
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Pharmacy Services - organization & administration - trends
Drug Therapy - standards - trends
Family Practice - organization & administration - trends
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Mentors
Ontario
Patient Care Team - organization & administration - trends
Pharmacists - trends
Physicians
Primary Health Care - organization & administration - trends
Professional Role
Abstract
Multidisciplinary team development generates changes in roles, responsibilities, and identities of individual health care providers. The Integrating Family Medicine and Pharmacy to Advance Primary Care Therapeutics (IMPACT) project introduced pharmacists into family practice teams across Ontario, Canada, to provide medication assessments, drug information, and academic detailing and to develop office system enhancements to improve drug therapy.
To analyze pharmacists' narrative accounts during early integration to study identity development within emerging team-based care.
Qualitative design using 63 pharmacist narrative reports of pharmacists' experiences over a 9-month integration period. Four independent researchers with varied professional backgrounds used immersion and crystallization to identify codes and iterative grounded theory to determine and debate process and content themes relevant to identity development.
The pharmacists' narratives spoke of the daily experiences of integrating into a family practice setting: feeling valued and contributing concretely to patient care; feeling underutilized; feeling like a nuisance, or feeling as though working too slowly. Pharmacist mentors helped deal with uncertainty and complexity of care. Pharmacists perceived that complementary clinical contributions enhanced their status with physicians and motivated pharmacists to take on new responsibilities. Changes in perspective, clinic-relevant skill development, and a new sense of professionalism signaled an emerging pharmacist family practice identity.
Pharmacists found that the integration into team-based primary health care provided both challenges and fresh opportunities. Pharmacists' professional identities evolved in relation to valued role models, emerging practice-level opportunities, and their patient-related contributions.
Notes
Comment In: Res Social Adm Pharm. 2009 Dec;5(4):302-419962673
PubMed ID
19962675 View in PubMed
Less detail

Psychiatric networks: they make sense, but do they work?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220976
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1993 Jun;38(5):319-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993
Author
N. Kates
B. Humphrey
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1993 Jun;38(5):319-23
Date
Jun-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration - trends
Consumer Satisfaction
Humans
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Care Team - organization & administration - trends
Psychiatry - trends
Quality Assurance, Health Care - trends
Abstract
With a trend toward coordinated networks of mental health services, it is necessary to be able to assess their impact. This paper outlines an approach to network analysis, using a variety of methodologies to come up with a composite picture. Areas to examine include the network processes, such as its goals, functions, structures, outcomes, and the satisfaction of all involved.
PubMed ID
8348470 View in PubMed
Less detail

The situation of hospital hygiene in Scandinavia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210406
Source
Zentralbl Hyg Umweltmed. 1996 Dec;199(2-4):172-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
J. Ojajärvi
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Zentralbl Hyg Umweltmed. 1996 Dec;199(2-4):172-7
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross Infection - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Finland - epidemiology
Forecasting
Humans
Infection Control - organization & administration - trends
Patient Care Team - organization & administration - trends
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Total Quality Management - trends
Abstract
The situation of hospital hygiene in Scandinavian countries, especially Finland, is described. The infection control activities are most often also quality assurance and management, although the infection control staff does not always realize it. The features of infection control in all Scandinavian countries are similar, but they differ in details. Most hospitals have Infection Control Committees with an advisory and expert role in infection control, but normally with no executive power. All Scandinavian countries have a network of skillful Infection Control Nurses working together with the Infection Control Officer of the hospital. The Scandinavian countries have advanced guidelines for various procedures and other activities that need infection control alertness. The voluntary infection control societies have a major role in the development of infection control activities and education. The development of suitable process and outcome quality indicators are a demanding task for the future.
PubMed ID
9353549 View in PubMed
Less detail

Taking the lead: community pharmacists' perception of their role potential within the primary care team.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146918
Source
Res Social Adm Pharm. 2009 Dec;5(4):327-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Roy T Dobson
Jeff G Taylor
Carol J Henry
Jean Lachaine
Gordon A Zello
David L Keegan
Dorothy A Forbes
Author Affiliation
College of Pharmacy and Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7 N 5C9, Canada. roy.dobson@usask.ca
Source
Res Social Adm Pharm. 2009 Dec;5(4):327-36
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Community Pharmacy Services - organization & administration - trends
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Leadership
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Care Team - organization & administration - trends
Patient-Centered Care
Pharmaceutical Services
Pharmacists - trends
Primary Health Care - organization & administration - trends
Professional Role
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Patient-focused care provided by an interprofessional team has long been presented as the preferred method of primary care delivery. Community pharmacists should and can provide leadership for many clinical and managerial activities within the primary care team.
To determine the extent to which community pharmacists are prepared to be members of the health care team, and to assess their support for general expansion of clinical responsibilities.
A mail questionnaire (in either English or French) was sent to 1500 community pharmacists between February and April 2004. Respondents were asked to indicate the necessity of pharmacy leadership for a range of clinical and managerial services associated with a primary care team. Respondents were also asked to indicate the extent to which they should be more involved in drug therapy selection and monitoring, as well as assuming greater responsibility for treating both minor and chronic illnesses.
The response rate was 35.2% (470/1337) with the highest response rate in the Prairie provinces (40.6%) and the lowest in Quebec (24.4%). Most pharmacists in the study did not advocate a strong leadership role for non-discipline-specific clinical and managerial activities. Most of them indicated that community pharmacists should be more involved in selecting (69.9%) and monitoring (81.0%) drug therapy, and be more responsible for treating minor illnesses (72.0%). Support for more responsibility declined to 50% for chronic illnesses.
The findings of the study suggest substantial variability among pharmacists in their perception of the need for pharmacy leadership across 16 clinical and managerial activities.
Notes
Comment In: Res Social Adm Pharm. 2009 Dec;5(4):302-419962673
PubMed ID
19962676 View in PubMed
Less detail

9 records – page 1 of 1.