Skip header and navigation

Refine By

50 records – page 1 of 5.

Application of physiotherapy outcome measures to the managed care model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215594
Source
Physiother Can. 1994;46(4):260-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
J. Thomas
P. Miller
A. Silaj
M L King
Author Affiliation
Toronto Hospital.
Source
Physiother Can. 1994;46(4):260-5
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Clinical Protocols
Data Collection
Female
Forms and Records Control
Humans
Knee Prosthesis - standards - statistics & numerical data
Male
Ontario
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Patient Care Planning - standards - statistics & numerical data
Physical Therapy Department, Hospital - standards - statistics & numerical data
Pilot Projects
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
Managed Care (MC) is a multidisciplinary model for health care delivery that organizes and sequences the caregiving process. Its objectives include: 1) to reduce length of stay and resource consumption, and 2) to measure, maintain or improve patient outcomes related to care received. Our tertiary care facility is the first Canadian hospital to implement MC. Patient care is directed through the use of a Care Map. Each map is specific to a pathological state and its treatment, i.e. Total Knee Replacement (TKR), and consists of a Patient Problem List, with related patient-centred outcomes, and a Critical Path. The Critical Path outlines the temporal sequence of the provision of care. Most key events on a Care Map are determined anecdotally. The purpose of this project was to collect outcome information in patients assigned to the Total Knee Replacement Care Map in an attempt to validate the existing Care Map or make recommendations for revisions. Inter-rater and intra-rater reliability of knee range of motion-was calculated using the Intra Class Correlation Coefficient (ICC). ICC values ranged from .64-.97. Seventeen patients were assessed. All patients were measured on Day 6 and 8 of the Care Map. This process has resulted in validation of certain range estimates and recommendations for revision of others.
PubMed ID
10138506 View in PubMed
Less detail

Application of the guidelines for client-centred practice to paediatric occupational therapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229292
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 1990 Apr;57(2):88-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1990
Author
D. Stewart
S. Harvey
Author Affiliation
Erinoak Serving Young People With Physical Disabilities, Mississauga, Ontario, L5L 2M5.
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 1990 Apr;57(2):88-94
Date
Apr-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Humans
Occupational Therapy - standards
Ontario
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Care Planning - standards
Pediatrics - standards
Referral and Consultation
Rehabilitation Centers - standards
Abstract
This paper outlines the process of incorporating the "Guidelines For the Client-Centred Practice of Occupational Therapy" into the practice of occupational therapy in an out-patient rehabilitation facility serving young people with physical disabilities. Specifically, the areas of practice addressed are screening and assessment. The process started in 1987 with an identification of the need to find a holistic framework that meets the complex needs of clients with chronic physical disabilities. The conceptual model of occupational performance, as outlined in the Guidelines, provided such a framework. The process of incorporating the Guidelines into the screening and assessment practices of occupational therapists at Erinoak Serving Young People With Physical Disabilities is described, with examples of documents developed by the department. Suggestions are given to integrate the conceptual model of occupational performance into the practice of occupational therapists working with children and adolescents with physical disabilities.
PubMed ID
10104739 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assigning service-dependent elderly to appropriate treatment settings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244278
Source
Soc Sci Med D. 1981 Aug;15(3):405-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1981

Can critical care be delivered humanely?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221680
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1993 Mar-Apr;2(2):16-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
F A Carnevale
Author Affiliation
Montreal Children's Hospital.
Source
Leadersh Health Serv. 1993 Mar-Apr;2(2):16-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Critical Care - standards
Empathy
Ethics, Medical
Hospitals, Pediatric - standards
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care, Neonatal - standards
Life Support Care - standards
Male
Patient Care Planning - standards
Patient care team
Professional-Family Relations
Quebec
Technology, High-Cost - utilization
Abstract
Technological advances have tremendously altered the nature of health care delivered to the critically ill. High-technology care should be balanced with a humanistic approach to meet the needs of the "whole person". Humanistic care can be fostered by cultivating open dialogue among patients, families, physicians, nurses, and other involved staff.
PubMed ID
10125207 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Check list for safer care in stroke].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177124
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Nov 4;101(45):3511-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-4-2004
Author
Bo Agren
Author Affiliation
Lasarettet i Helsingborg. bo.agren@helsingborgslasarett.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2004 Nov 4;101(45):3511-3
Date
Nov-4-2004
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Disability Evaluation
Humans
Needs Assessment
Patient Care Planning - standards
Patient Care Team - standards
Safety
Stroke - diagnosis - rehabilitation - therapy
Sweden
PubMed ID
15575423 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Clinical pharmacist improves the use of drugs in hospital].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178869
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Aug 12;124(15):1923-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-12-2004
Author
Piia Pretsch
Sissel W Hertzenberg
Sjur Humerfelt
Author Affiliation
Sykehusapotekene ANS, Sykehusapoteket Aker, Trondheimsveien 235, 0514 Oslo. piia_pretsch@yahoo.com
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 Aug 12;124(15):1923-5
Date
Aug-12-2004
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Drug Information Services
Drug Prescriptions - standards
Drug Utilization - standards
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Humans
Lung Diseases - drug therapy
Medication Errors - prevention & control
Norway
Patient Care Planning - standards
Patient care team
Pharmaceutical Preparations - administration & dosage
Pharmacists
Pharmacy Service, Hospital - manpower - standards
Quality Assurance, Health Care - methods - organization & administration
Respiratory Care Units - standards
Abstract
We investigated how a clinical pharmacist can contribute to quality assurance of the use of drugs for inpatients in a respiratory ward.
Up to twice a week over two periods (43 meetings, 31 in the first and 12 in the second period), a clinical pharmacist sat in on the morning meetings regarding patients. Various drug-related problems were identified and discussed.
The clinical pharmacist took part in discussions of 232 (70%) of a total of 332 patients. On average, 0.71 drug-related problems per patient resulting in a prescription change were identified. This included 239 drug-related problems: lack of use of drugs (25), unnecessary use (18) or wrong use (1); too low dose (16), too high dose (30); adverse effects (29); compliance (10) and miscellaneous problems (110). The average number of prescription changes suggested by the clinical pharmacist went down from 0.81 per patient in the first period to 0.57 in the second (p
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Nov 30;126(23):314817160128
PubMed ID
15306860 View in PubMed
Less detail

Congruence between nursing problems in nursing care plans and NANDA nursing diagnoses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95179
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2009;146:778-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Varsi Cecilie
Ruland Cornelia M
Author Affiliation
Center for Shared Decision Making and Nursing Research, Rikshospitalet Medical Center, Oslo, Norway. cecilie.varsi@rr-research.no
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2009;146:778-9
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Norway
Nursing Assessment - classification
Nursing Diagnosis - classification
Nursing Records
Patient Care Planning - standards
Abstract
This study abstracted nursing problems documented in cancer patients' nursing care plans to analyze (1) which nursing problems were documented and (2) the degree of congruence between the abstracted problems and NANDA nursing diagnoses. 236 unique nursing problems were identified and could be mapped to 32 NANDA nursing diagnoses. However, only 4.3% had a precise match with NANDA, Thirty-eight percent were classified as similar and the rest were broader, narrower or no match. Thus NANDA only partially covered problems written by nurses in the care plans for this group of patients.
PubMed ID
19592976 View in PubMed
Less detail

Development of an evaluation tool for a clinical practice guideline on nursing assessment and device selection for vascular access.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165603
Source
J Infus Nurs. 2007 Jan-Feb;30(1):45-54
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kathryn A Smith Higuchi
Nancy Edwards
Evangeline Danseco
Barbara Davies
Heather McConnell
Author Affiliation
University of Ottawa School of Nursing, 451 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H 8M5. khiguchi@uottawa.ca
Source
J Infus Nurs. 2007 Jan-Feb;30(1):45-54
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Catheterization, Peripheral - adverse effects - instrumentation - nursing
Catheters, Indwelling - adverse effects
Clinical Competence - standards
Decision Making
Documentation - standards
Evidence-Based Medicine
Feasibility Studies
Female
Guideline Adherence - standards
Home Care Services
Hospitals, Community
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Assessment - standards
Nursing Audit - methods - standards
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Records - standards
Ontario
Patient Care Planning - standards
Patient Selection
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
This study developed and tested a chart audit tool to assess the implementation of evidence-based recommendations for vascular access nursing assessment and device selection. Chart audits of 71 patients were conducted in a home healthcare agency and a community hospital prior to guideline implementation. Observations of initial infusion therapy and chart audit documentation of 31 patients were also compared. Results from observations indicated that nurses provided care consistent with the recommendations, but findings from chart audits indicated that assessment and decisionmaking were poorly documented. Studies that use only precomparison and postcomparison by chart audit may miss changes in nursing practice.
PubMed ID
17228198 View in PubMed
Less detail

50 records – page 1 of 5.