Skip header and navigation

Refine By

714 records – page 1 of 72.

A 2-year follow-up of involuntary admission's influence upon adherence and outcome in first-episode psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145997
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 May;121(5):371-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
S. Opjordsmoen
S. Friis
I. Melle
U. Haahr
J O Johannessen
T K Larsen
J I Røssberg
B R Rund
E. Simonsen
P. Vaglum
T H McGlashan
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål and Institute of Psychiatry, University of Oslo, Norway. o.s.e.ilner@medisin.uio.no
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2010 May;121(5):371-6
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Combined Modality Therapy
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Norway
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patient Compliance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotherapy - statistics & numerical data
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Sex Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
To see, if voluntary admission for treatment in first-episode psychosis results in better adherence to treatment and more favourable outcome than involuntary admission.
We compared consecutively first-admitted, hospitalised patients from a voluntary (n = 91) with an involuntary (n = 126) group as to psychopathology and functioning using Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale and Global Assessment of Functioning Scales at baseline, after 3 months and at 2 year follow-up. Moreover, duration of supportive psychotherapy, medication and number of hospitalisations during the 2 years were measured.
More women than men were admitted involuntarily. Voluntary patients had less psychopathology and better functioning than involuntary patients at baseline. No significant difference as to duration of psychotherapy and medication between groups was found. No significant difference was found as to psychopathology and functioning between voluntarily and involuntarily admitted patients at follow-up.
Legal admission status per se did not seem to influence treatment adherence and outcome.
PubMed ID
20085554 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 5-year follow-up study of suicide attempts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46467
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1996 Mar;93(3):151-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
E. Johnsson Fridell
A. Ojehagen
L. Träskman-Bendz
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Lund University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1996 Mar;93(3):151-7
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adjustment Disorders - mortality - psychology - therapy
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - mortality - psychology - therapy
Cause of Death
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology
Depressive Disorder - mortality - psychology - therapy
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Personality Disorders - mortality - psychology - therapy
Recurrence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Seventy-five patients were admitted to the ward of the Lund Suicide Research Center following a suicide attempt. After 5 years, the patients were followed up by a personal semistructured interview covering sociodemographic, psychosocial and psychiatric areas. Ten patients (13%) had committed suicide during the follow-up period, the majority within 2 years. They tended to be older at the index attempt admission, and most of them had a mood disorder in comparison with the others. Two patients had died from somatic diseases. Forty-two patients were interviewed, of whom 17 (40%) had reattempted during the follow-up period, most of them within 3 years. Predictors for reattempt were young age, personality disorder, parents having received treatment for psychiatric disorder, and a poor social network. At the index attempt, none of the reattempters had diagnoses of adjustment disorders or anxiety disorders. At follow-up, reattempters had more psychiatric symptoms (SCL-90), and their overall functioning (GAF) was poor compared to those who did not reattempt. All of the reattempters had long-lasting treatment ( > 3 years) as compared to 56% of the others. It is of great clinical importance to focus on treatment strategies for the vulnerable subgroup of self-destructive reattempters.
PubMed ID
8739657 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 20-year prospective study of mortality and causes of death among hospitalized opioid addicts in Oslo.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87156
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2008;8:8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Bjornaas Mari A
Bekken Anette S
Ojlert Aasa
Haldorsen Tor
Jacobsen Dag
Rostrup Morten
Ekeberg Oivind
Author Affiliation
Department of Acute Medicine, Ullevaal University Hospital, N-0407 Oslo, Norway. mabjornaas@gmail.com
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2008;8:8
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality
Adolescent
Adult
Cause of Death - trends
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospital Mortality - trends
Humans
Male
Mathematical Computing
Narcotics - poisoning
Neoplasms - mortality
Opioid-Related Disorders - mortality - rehabilitation
Overdose - mortality - prevention & control
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Risk
Street Drugs - poisoning
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Violence - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To study mortality rate and causes of death among all hospitalized opioid addicts treated for self-poisoning or admitted for voluntary detoxification in Oslo between 1980 and 1981, and to compare their mortality to that of the general population. METHODS: A prospective cohort study was conducted on 185 opioid addicts from all medical departments in Oslo who were treated for either self-poisoning (n = 93, 1980), voluntary detoxification (n = 75, 1980/1981) or both (n = 17). Their median age was 24 years; with a range from 16 to 41, and 53% were males. All deaths that had occurred by the end of 2000 were identified from the Central Population Register. Causes of death were obtained from Statistics Norway. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were computed for mortality, in general, and in particular, for different causes of death. RESULTS: During a period of 20 years, 70 opioid addicts died (37.8%), with a standardized mortality ratio (SMR) equal to 23.6 (95% CI, 18.7-29.9). The SMR remained high during the whole period, ranging from 32.4 in the first five-year period, to 13.4 in the last five-year period. There were no significant differences in SMR between self-poisonings and those admitted for voluntarily detoxification. The registered causes of death were accidents (11.4%), suicide (7.1%), cancer (4.3%), cardiovascular disease (2.9%), other violent deaths (2.9%), other diseases (71.4%). Among the 50 deaths classified as other diseases, the category "drug dependence" was listed in the vast majority of cases (37 deaths, 52.9% of the total). SMRs increased significantly for all causes of death, with the other diseases group having the highest SMR; 65.8 (95% CI, 49.9-86.9). The SMR was 5.4 (95% CI, 1.3-21.5) for cardiovascular diseases, and 4.3 (95% CI, 1.4-13.5) for cancer. The SMR was 13.2 (95% CI, 6.6-26.4) for accidents, 10.7 (95% CI, 4.5-25.8) for suicides, and 28.6 (95% CI, 7.1-114.4) for other violent deaths. CONCLUSION: The risk of death among opioid addicts was significantly higher for all causes of death compared with the general population, implying a poor prognosis over a 20-year period for this young patient group.
PubMed ID
18271956 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 20-year study of an adolescent psychiatric clientele, with special reference to the age of onset.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31748
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2001;55(1):5-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
J. Pedersen
T. Aarkrog
Author Affiliation
Department of Child Psychiatry, Centralsygehuset i Holbaek, Gl. Ringstedvej 1, DK-4300 Holbaek, Denmark.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2001;55(1):5-10
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Borderline Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Hospitals, Urban
Humans
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Schizophrenia, Childhood - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Schizotypal Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
During a period of 20 years (1968-1988) all inpatients admitted for the first time to the adolescent psychiatric unit in Copenhagen (n = 841) were classified in accordance with social and psychiatric variables, to describe the clientele as a group and, furthermore, to investigate changes occurring during that period. The total clientele had a broad age range (12-21 years), with as many as 36% less than 15 years old. Eleven percent of the patients had attempted suicide before admission. Fifty-six percent of the total group were diagnosed as psychotic or as borderline cases. The patients came predominantly from lower social levels, and almost half the group had a child debut defined as symptoms that had resulted in referral for further investigation during childhood. Moreover, among the schizophrenic patients 35% had an early onset. The age of onset may have some clinical significance, as this item was related to several sociodemographic variables. Finally, an increase in the rate of psychoses and lower social class was recorded during the period.
PubMed ID
11827600 View in PubMed
Less detail

30-Day Survival Probabilities as a Quality Indicator for Norwegian Hospitals: Data Management and Analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273361
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(9):e0136547
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Sahar Hassani
Anja Schou Lindman
Doris Tove Kristoffersen
Oliver Tomic
Jon Helgeland
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(9):e0136547
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comorbidity
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Episode of Care
Hospital Mortality
Hospital records
Hospitals - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Length of Stay
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Patient transfer
Probability
Quality Improvement
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Survival Analysis
Abstract
The Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services (NOKC) reports 30-day survival as a quality indicator for Norwegian hospitals. The indicators have been published annually since 2011 on the website of the Norwegian Directorate of Health (www.helsenorge.no), as part of the Norwegian Quality Indicator System authorized by the Ministry of Health. Openness regarding calculation of quality indicators is important, as it provides the opportunity to critically review and discuss the method. The purpose of this article is to describe the data collection, data pre-processing, and data analyses, as carried out by NOKC, for the calculation of 30-day risk-adjusted survival probability as a quality indicator.
Three diagnosis-specific 30-day survival indicators (first time acute myocardial infarction (AMI), stroke and hip fracture) are estimated based on all-cause deaths, occurring in-hospital or out-of-hospital, within 30 days counting from the first day of hospitalization. Furthermore, a hospital-wide (i.e. overall) 30-day survival indicator is calculated. Patient administrative data from all Norwegian hospitals and information from the Norwegian Population Register are retrieved annually, and linked to datasets for previous years. The outcome (alive/death within 30 days) is attributed to every hospital by the fraction of time spent in each hospital. A logistic regression followed by a hierarchical Bayesian analysis is used for the estimation of risk-adjusted survival probabilities. A multiple testing procedure with a false discovery rate of 5% is used to identify hospitals, hospital trusts and regional health authorities with significantly higher/lower survival than the reference. In addition, estimated risk-adjusted survival probabilities are published per hospital, hospital trust and regional health authority. The variation in risk-adjusted survival probabilities across hospitals for AMI shows a decreasing trend over time: estimated survival probabilities for AMI in 2011 varied from 80.6% (in the hospital with lowest estimated survival) to 91.7% (in the hospital with highest estimated survival), whereas it ranged from 83.8% to 91.2% in 2013.
Since 2011, several hospitals and hospital trusts have initiated quality improvement projects, and some of the hospitals have improved the survival over these years. Public reporting of survival/mortality indicators are increasingly being used as quality measures of health care systems. Openness regarding the methods used to calculate the indicators are important, as it provides the opportunity of critically reviewing and discussing the methods in the literature. In this way, the methods employed for establishing the indicators may be improved.
Notes
Cites: PLoS Med. 2010;7(11):e100100421151347
Cites: Med Care. 2010 Dec;48(12):1117-2120978451
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:36423088745
Cites: Qual Saf Health Care. 2003 Apr;12(2):100-612679505
Cites: Int J Qual Health Care. 2001 Dec;13(6):475-8011769750
Cites: BMJ Open. 2015;5(3):e00674125808167
Cites: BMJ. 2003 Apr 12;326(7393):816-912689983
Cites: Int J Qual Health Care. 2003 Dec;15(6):523-3014660535
Cites: Stat Med. 1994 May 15;13(9):889-9038047743
Cites: Health Care Financ Rev. 1995 Summer;16(4):107-2710151883
Cites: Heart. 1996 Jul;76(1):70-58774332
Cites: Stat Med. 1997 Dec 15;16(23):2645-649421867
Cites: Med Care. 2005 Nov;43(11):1130-916224307
Cites: Circulation. 2006 Jan 24;113(3):456-6216365198
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2011 Mar 15;173(6):676-8221330339
PubMed ID
26352600 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abnormal vital signs are strong predictors for intensive care unit admission and in-hospital mortality in adults triaged in the emergency department - a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125355
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2012;20:28
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Charlotte Barfod
Marlene Mauson Pankoke Lauritzen
Jakob Klim Danker
György Sölétormos
Jakob Lundager Forberg
Peter Anthony Berlac
Freddy Lippert
Lars Hyldborg Lundstrøm
Kristian Antonsen
Kai Henrik Wiborg Lange
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Hillerød Hospital, Denmark. cbar@hih.regionh.dk
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2012;20:28
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Intensive Care Units - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Triage - methods - statistics & numerical data
Vital Signs
Young Adult
Abstract
Assessment and treatment of the acutely ill patient have improved by introducing systematic assessment and accelerated protocols for specific patient groups. Triage systems are widely used, but few studies have investigated the ability of the triage systems in predicting outcome in the unselected acute population. The aim of this study was to quantify the association between the main component of the Hillerød Acute Process Triage (HAPT) system and the outcome measures; Admission to Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and in-hospital mortality, and to identify the vital signs, scored and categorized at admission, that are most strongly associated with the outcome measures.
The HAPT system is a minor modification of the Swedish Adaptive Process Triage (ADAPT) and ranks patients into five level colour-coded triage categories. Each patient is assigned a triage category for the two main descriptors; vital signs, T(vitals), and presenting complaint, T(complaint). The more urgent of the two determines the final triage category, T(final). We retrieved 6279 unique adult patients admitted through the Emergency Department (ED) from the Acute Admission Database. We performed regression analysis to evaluate the association between the covariates and the outcome measures.
The covariates, T(vitals), T(complaint) and T(final) were all significantly associated with ICU admission and in-hospital mortality, the odds increasing with the urgency of the triage category. The vital signs best predicting in-hospital mortality were saturation of peripheral oxygen (SpO(2)), respiratory rate (RR), systolic blood pressure (BP) and Glasgow Coma Score (GCS). Not only the type, but also the number of abnormal vital signs, were predictive for adverse outcome. The presenting complaints associated with the highest in-hospital mortality were 'dyspnoea' (11.5%) and 'altered level of consciousness' (10.6%). More than half of the patients had a T(complaint) more urgent than T(vitals), the opposite was true in just 6% of the patients.
The HAPT system is valid in terms of predicting in-hospital mortality and ICU admission in the adult acute population. Abnormal vital signs are strongly associated with adverse outcome, while including the presenting complaint in the triage model may result in over-triage.
Notes
Cites: J Intern Med. 2004 May;255(5):579-8715078500
Cites: Am J Emerg Med. 1987 Jul;5(4):278-823593492
Cites: Emerg Med Australas. 2005 Jun;17(3):212-715953221
Cites: CJEM. 2008 Mar;10(2):151-7318371253
Cites: Rev Esp Salud Publica. 2008 May-Jun;82(3):251-918711640
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2012;20:2922490233
Cites: Emerg Med J. 2010 Feb;27(2):86-9220156855
Cites: Resuscitation. 2010 Aug;81(8):932-720637974
Cites: J Emerg Med. 2011 Jun;40(6):623-818930373
Cites: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2011;19:4221718476
Cites: Ugeskr Laeger. 2011 Oct 3;173(40):2490-321975184
Cites: J Emerg Med. 2010 Jan;38(1):70-918514465
PubMed ID
22490208 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Abuse of psychoactive drugs and social adjustment of psychotic patients].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203535
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1998 Dec;43(10):1036-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
A. Lépine
G. Côté
Author Affiliation
Département de psychologie, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières, Québec.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1998 Dec;43(10):1036-9
Date
Dec-1998
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Humans
Male
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Prisoners - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Psychotropic Drugs
Quebec
Social Adjustment
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
Is the abuse of psychoactive drugs in psychotic patients linked to social adjustment?
Fifty-five psychotic men from a detention centre or a psychiatric hospital were assessed with the Social Adjustment Scale (SAS-II) and a French version of the Phillips Rating Scale of Premorbid Adjustment in Schizophrenia.
In psychotic patients, the abuse of psychoactive drugs is linked to some indicators of social adjustment and premorbid sexual adaptation.
Differences were found in some aspects of social functioning, but it is difficult to establish an overall assessment of social adjustment.
PubMed ID
9868570 View in PubMed
Less detail

Access to health care among status Aboriginal people with chronic kidney disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154422
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Nov 4;179(10):1007-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-4-2008
Author
Song Gao
Braden J Manns
Bruce F Culleton
Marcello Tonelli
Hude Quan
Lynden Crowshoe
William A Ghali
Lawrence W Svenson
Sofia Ahmed
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB.
Source
CMAJ. 2008 Nov 4;179(10):1007-12
Date
Nov-4-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alberta - epidemiology
Chronic Disease
Creatinine - blood
Delphi Technique
Female
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Health Services Accessibility
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Kidney Diseases - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Nephrology
Office visits - statistics & numerical data
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Ethnic disparities in access to health care and health outcomes are well documented. It is unclear whether similar differences exist between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people with chronic kidney disease in Canada. We determined whether access to care differed between status Aboriginal people (Aboriginal people registered under the federal Indian Act) and non-Aboriginal people with chronic kidney disease.
We identified 106 511 non-Aboriginal and 1182 Aboriginal patients with chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)). We compared outcomes, including hospital admissions, that may have been preventable with appropriate outpatient care (ambulatory-care-sensitive conditions) as well as use of specialist services, including visits to nephrologists and general internists.
Aboriginal people were almost twice as likely as non-Aboriginal people to be admitted to hospital for an ambulatory-care-sensitive condition (rate ratio 1.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.46-2.13). Aboriginal people with severe chronic kidney disease (estimated glomerular filtration rate
Notes
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2000 Jun 26;160(12):1862-610871982
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 2000 Dec;11(12):2351-711095658
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2001 May 10;344(19):1443-911346810
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2001 Mar-Apr;92(2):155-911338156
Cites: Med Care. 2001 Jun;39(6):551-6111404640
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2001 Sep 20;345(12):861-911565518
Cites: Clin Invest Med. 2001 Aug;24(4):164-7011558850
Cites: Lancet. 2001 Oct 6;358(9288):1147-5311597669
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2002 Mar;25(3):512-611874939
Cites: JAMA. 2002 Mar 13;287(10):1288-9411886320
Cites: Am J Kidney Dis. 2002 Feb;39(2 Suppl 1):S1-26611904577
Cites: Med J Aust. 2002 Aug 5;177(3):135-812149081
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2002 Aug 20;137(4):298-912186531
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2002 Sep 17;137(6):479-8612230348
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2002 Sep 23;162(17):2002-612230424
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2003 May;93(5):798-80212721147
Cites: BMJ. 2003 Aug 23;327(7412):419-2212933728
Cites: Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2004 Jul;19(7):1808-1415199194
Cites: CMAJ. 2004 Sep 14;171(6):577-8215367459
Cites: Health Rep. 1993;5(2):179-888292757
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1996 Apr;86(4):520-48604782
Cites: CMAJ. 1996 Dec 1;155(11):1569-788956834
Cites: Health Econ. 1997 Mar-Apr;6(2):197-2079158971
Cites: Health Rep. 1998 Spring;9(4):49-58(Eng); 51-61(Fre)9836880
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1999 Mar 16;130(6):461-7010075613
Cites: Am J Kidney Dis. 1999 Apr;33(4):728-3310196016
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 2005 Feb;16(2):459-6615615823
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2005 Jan-Feb;96 Suppl 1:S39-4415686152
Cites: J Am Soc Nephrol. 2007 Nov;18(11):2953-917942955
Comment In: CMAJ. 2008 Nov 4;179(10):985-618981431
PubMed ID
18981441 View in PubMed
Less detail

The accuracy of administrative data for identifying the presence and timing of admission to intensive care units in a Canadian province.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127694
Source
Med Care. 2012 Mar;50(3):e1-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Allan Garland
Marina Yogendran
Kendiss Olafson
Damon C Scales
Kari-Lynne McGowan
Randy Fransoo
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada. agarland@hsc.mb.ca
Source
Med Care. 2012 Mar;50(3):e1-6
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Critical Care - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Databases, Factual - standards
Hospital Information Systems - organization & administration - standards
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Intensive Care Units - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Manitoba
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Abstract
A prerequisite for using administrative data to study the care of critically ill patients in intensive care units (ICUs) is that it accurately identifies such care. Only limited data exist on this subject.
To assess the accuracy of administrative data in the Canadian province of Manitoba for identifying the existence, number, and timing of admissions to adult ICUs.
For the period 1999 to 2008, we compared information about ICU care from Manitoba hospital abstracts, with the criterion standard of a clinical ICU database that includes all admissions to adult ICUs in its largest city of Winnipeg. Comparisons were made before and after a national change in administrative data requirements that mandated specific data elements identifying the existence and timing of ICU care.
In both time intervals, hospital abstracts were extremely accurate in identifying the presence of ICU care, with positive predictive values exceeding 98% and negative predictive values exceeding 99%. Administrative data correctly identified the number of separate ICU admissions for 93% of ICU-containing hospitalizations; inaccuracy increased with more ICU stays per hospitalization. Hospital abstracts were highly accurate for identifying the timing of ICU care, but only for hospitalizations containing a single ICU admission.
Under current national-reporting requirements, hospital administrative data in Canada can be used to accurately identify and quantify ICU care. The high accuracy of Manitoba administrative data under the previous reporting standards, which lacked standardized coding elements specific to ICU care, may not be generalizable to other Canadian jurisdictions.
PubMed ID
22270100 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A community short-term crisis unit does not reduce acute admissions to psychiatric wards]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95020
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2009 Oct 8;129(19):1973-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-8-2009
Author
Bergerud Tone
Møller Paul
Larsen Frode
Veenstra Marijke
Ruud Torleif
Author Affiliation
Allmennpsykiatrisk døgnseksjon, Psykiatrisk Senter Asker, Sykehuset Asker og Baerum, Postboks 83, 1309 Rud, Norway. tone.bergerud@sabhf.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2009 Oct 8;129(19):1973-6
Date
Oct-8-2009
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Community Mental Health Centers
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Crisis Intervention - organization & administration
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - therapy
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Due to long-term capacity problems in the psychiatric acute ward, we tried to canalise acute admissions due to life crises (and not serious mental disease) to a new short-term in-patient crisis unit. Our hypothesis was that the opening of this unit would lead to fewer admissions to the psychiatric acute ward and that this change would be reflected by an increase of patients with a more severe psychopathology. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study had a quasi-experimental design. Two patient groups in a psychiatric acute ward (from separate catchment areas) were compared before (2.1.2003-1.6.2003) and after (2.1.2004-1.6.2004) establishment of a community based short-term inpatient crisis unit in one of the catchment areas. RESULTS: 234 patients were included in the study. Admissions to the psychiatric acute ward did not decline from any of the catchment areas from the first to the second time-period . The second time-period was associated with less psychopathology, but only for men in the area with a crisis unit. The reduction was largest for self-harm and suicidal behaviour (p = 0.02) and depression (p = 0.01). INTERPRETATION: None of our hypotheses were confirmed. Our main conclusion is that patient flow in acute mental health services involves a multitude of complex and unpredictable factors. The services continuously reorganise. Different ways of organising mental health services are rarely studied systematically, and such studies are difficult and resource demanding.
PubMed ID
19823199 View in PubMed
Less detail

714 records – page 1 of 72.