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[Family income, demand and use of dental health care among Norwegian adult population 1983-1987]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52898
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1989 Nov;99(19):748-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1989
Author
J. Grytten
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1989 Nov;99(19):748-56
Date
Nov-1989
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Dental Health Services - supply & distribution - utilization
English Abstract
Humans
Norway
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of this study was to describe changes in demand and utilization of dental services according to family income among adults in Norway from 1983 to 1987. The analysis was performed on two sets of national data, which were representative of the Norwegian population aged 20 years and above. The sample size was 1,289 individuals in 1983 and 1,166 individuals in 1987. The data were analyzed according to a two-part model. The first part determined the probability of whether the consumer had demanded the services or not during the last year. The second part estimated how expenditure depended on income, given some expenditure. Family size, number of teeth present, age, gender and education were entered into the analysis as control variables. For edentulous people, and people with few remaining teeth, there were marked differences in demand and utilization of dental services according to family income both in 1983 and in 1987. During this period, there has been an increase in demand, while utilization has stayed constant. In the population as a whole, the turnover of dental services has increased by the equivalent of 80 "dentists' years work" from 1983 to 1987 due to the increase in demand.
PubMed ID
2637994 View in PubMed
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Increasing uptake of colorectal cancer screening.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90522
Source
BMJ. 2009;338:a2658
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009

Beyond case fatality rate: using potential impact fraction to estimate the effect of increasing treatment uptake on mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107448
Source
BMC Med Res Methodol. 2013;13:109
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Nicholas Mitsakakis
Harindra C Wijeysundera
Murray Krahn
Author Affiliation
Toronto Health Economics and Technology Assessment (THETA) Collaborative, Toronto, Canada. n.mitsakakis@theta.utoronto.ca.
Source
BMC Med Res Methodol. 2013;13:109
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - therapy
Humans
Models, Statistical
Multivariate Analysis
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
IMPACT is an epidemiological model that has been used to estimate how increased treatment uptakes affect mortality and related outcomes. The model calculations require the use of case fatality rate estimates under no treatment. Due to the lack of data, rates where treatment is partially present are often used instead, introducing bias. A method that does not rely on no-treatment case fatality rate estimates is needed.
Potential Impact Fraction (PIF) measures the proportional reduction in the disease or mortality risk, when the distribution of a risk factor changes. Here, we first describe a probabilistic framework for interpreting quantities used in the IMPACT model, and then we show how this is connected with PIF, facilitating its use for the estimation of the relative reduction of mortality caused by treatment uptake increase. We compare the proposed and standard methods to estimate the reduction of cardiovascular disease deaths in Ontario, if utilization of coronary heart disease interventions was increased to the level of 90%.
Using the proposed method, we estimated that increasing treatment to benchmark levels uptake results in a reduction of 22.5% in cardiovascular mortality. The standard method gives a reduction of 20.8%.
Here we present an alternative method for the estimation of the effect of treatment uptake change on mortality. Our example suggests that the bias associated with the standard method may be substantial. This approach offers a useful tool for epidemiological and health care research and policy.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24006924 View in PubMed
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The effect of copayments on the utilization of the GP service in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295389
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2018 05; 205:99-106
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
05-2018
Author
Mari Magnussen Landsem
Jon Magnussen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Nursing, NTNU, Norway.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2018 05; 205:99-106
Date
05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Cost Sharing
Female
General Practice - economics
Humans
Male
Norway
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
We examine the effect of copayment on the utilization of the GP service in Norway. We use a regression discontinuity design to study two key aspects of the policy. First, we examine the overall effect of copayments on total utilization of the GP service. Second, we look at how this effect varies across different patient groups according to medical necessity. Data consists of 5,5 million GP visits for youths aged 10-20 over the 6 year period 2009-2014. We find that the introduction of a co-payment leads to an overall reduction of GP visits of 10-15%. The effect is heterogeneous across patient groups. Patients with an acute condition exhibit low price sensitivity. Patients with general complaints and symptoms, chronic diseases and psychological diseases all react strongly to the copayment. The two latter groups capture patients with conditions that typically warrant medical attention. This paper thus suggests that the current flat fee copayment policy is inefficient at targeting unnecessary use of the GP service at the cost of patients with real medical concerns.
PubMed ID
29677584 View in PubMed
Less detail

Danish men consult GPs less than women but attend hospital more and have greater mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84724
Source
BMJ. 2007 Nov 17;335(7628):1010-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-17-2007

Utilisation of medical care by abused women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73465
Source
BMJ. 1992 Jul 4;305(6844):27-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-4-1992
Author
B. Bergman
B. Brismar
C. Nordin
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge Hospital, Sweden.
Source
BMJ. 1992 Jul 4;305(6844):27-8
Date
Jul-4-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Humans
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Spouse Abuse - psychology
Sweden
Wounds and Injuries - etiology
PubMed ID
1638194 View in PubMed
Less detail

Effect of regulatory changes on the frequency of emergency department visits to request prescriptions for emergency contraception.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164761
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2007 Mar;29(3):217-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007

An epidemiological survey of constipation in canada: definitions, rates, demographics, and predictors of health care seeking.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192419
Source
Am J Gastroenterol. 2001 Nov;96(11):3130-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Author
P. Pare
S. Ferrazzi
W G Thompson
E J Irvine
L. Rance
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Laval University, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Am J Gastroenterol. 2001 Nov;96(11):3130-7
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Constipation - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Abstract
The prevalence of functional constipation is highly variable among epidemiological surveys and may relate to the definitions applied. We estimated the population prevalence of self-reported, Rome I-defined, and Rome II-defined constipation in Canada and determined the variables that best predicted health care seeking.
A research firm was employed to conduct a random digit dial national survey, inviting household members at least 18 yr of age to participate in a study assessing personal health issues. The sample was stratified to ensure that each region of Canada was represented. Data collection involved three stages: 1) recruitment of participants by phone, 2) mailing of the questionnaire, and 3) data retrieval through a follow-up phone call. The Rome II questionnaire was used to derive the prevalence of functional constipation using both Rome I and Rome II criteria.
Of the 1149 participants, 27.2% self-reported constipation within the past 3 months, and 16.7% and 14.9% had functional constipation according to Rome I and II, criteria, respectively. For all three definitions, the rate for women was close to twice that for men. Approximately 34% of those with self-reported constipation had visited a physician for it, versus 26.3% of Rome II subjects. In a regression model, subjects self-reporting in the past 3 months were more likely to have seen a doctor for their constipation (odds ratio 2.47, p
PubMed ID
11721760 View in PubMed
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[Coverage of anti-tetanus vaccinations in adults in Canada-year 2002. ].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176824
Source
Can J Public Health. 2004 Nov-Dec;95(6):456-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Norbert Coulibaly
Gaston De Serres
Author Affiliation
Département de médecine sociale et préventive, Faculté de médecine, Université Laval, Québec.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2004 Nov-Dec;95(6):456-9
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Tetanus - prevention & control
Tetanus Toxoid - administration & dosage
Abstract
The rare cases of tetanus that have occurred in Canada were in adults whose vaccination was not up-to-date. The objective of this study was to estimate the vaccine coverage in Canadian adults.
1,002 individuals 18 years of age and older selected by random digit dialing were interviewed by telephone in February 2002. Information was collected about their vaccination status, the circumstances of their vaccination, and their opinion about the duration of the protection of the tetanus vaccine and the recommended interval between booster doses.
The participation rate was 38%. Overall, 54% of participants reported having received one dose of tetanus vaccine during the last 10 years: 58% for men and 51% for women. The vaccine coverage was lower in adults > or =60 years of age than in those under 60 (38% vs. 59%). Most doses (57%) were administered as part of treatment for a wound. 30% of participants thought they were protected for life by their childhood immunization against tetanus, whereas 52% knew they had to receive a booster dose each 6-10 years.
Vaccine coverage against tetanus is insufficient in adults, especially those > or =60 years of age. As most doses are administered as part of wound treatment, it is not likely that this situation will improve without developing specific interventions.
PubMed ID
15622797 View in PubMed
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Introducing nurse-led heart failure clinics in Swedish primary care settings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300173
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 2019 01; 21(1):103-109
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2019
Author
Maria Liljeroos
Anna Strömberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 2019 01; 21(1):103-109
Date
01-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Disease Management
Female
Heart Failure - nursing
Humans
Male
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Registries
Sweden
Abstract
According to clinical guidelines, it is recommended that patients with heart failure (HF) receive structured multidisciplinary care at nurse-led HF clinics in order to optimise treatment and avoid preventable readmissions. Today, there are HF clinics with specialist-trained nurses at almost all Swedish hospitals, but HF clinics remain scarce in primary care (PC). The aim of this study was two-fold: firstly, to evaluate the effects of systematically implementing nurse-led HF clinics in PC settings with regard to hospital healthcare utilisation and evidence-based HF treatment, and secondly to explore patients' experiences of HF clinics in PC.
The study had a pre-post design. Annual measurement were done between 2010-2017 regarding in-hospital healthcare consumption and medical treatment. Data from 2011-2017 after the implementation of HF clinics in PC in one county council Sweden were compared with baseline data collected before the implementation in 2010. The implementation of HF clinics in PC significantly reduced the number of HF-related hospital admissions by 27% (P?
Notes
CommentIn: Eur J Heart Fail. 2019 Jan;21(1):110-111 PMID 30520538
PubMed ID
30338881 View in PubMed
Less detail

442 records – page 1 of 45.