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Acute forensic medical procedures used following a sexual assault among treatment-seeking women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175653
Source
Women Health. 2004;40(2):53-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Hester Dunlap
Paulette Brazeau
Lana Stermac
Mary Addison
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto at Sunnybrook and Women's College of Health Sciences Centre, Room 231, 7th Floor, 252 Bloor Street, West, Toronto, ON, M5S 1V6, Canada. hester_dunlap@camh.net
Source
Women Health. 2004;40(2):53-65
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Battered Women - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Crime Victims - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Forensic Pathology - standards
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Physical Examination
Rape - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Social Perception
Socioeconomic Factors
Women's Health Services - standards
Abstract
Despite the negative physical and mental health outcomes of sexual assault, a minority of sexually assaulted women seek immediate post-assault medical and legal services. This study identified the number and types of acute forensic medical procedures used by women presenting at a hospital-based urgent care centre between 1997 and 2001 within 72 hours following a reported sexual assault. The study also examined assault and non-assault factors associated with the use of procedures. It was hypothesized that assault characteristics resembling the stereotype of rape would be associated with the use of more procedures. The multiple regression indicated that injury severity, coercion severity, homelessness, and delay in presentation were significantly associated with the number of procedures received. Findings provide partial support for the hypothesis that post-assault procedures would be associated with the stereotype of rape, and highlight homeless women as a group particularly at risk for not receiving adequate medical treatment following a sexual assault.
PubMed ID
15778138 View in PubMed
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Acute psychological reactions in assault victims of non-domestic violence: peritraumatic dissociation, post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety and depression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79450
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2006;60(6):452-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Johansen Venke A
Wahl Astrid K
Eilertsen Dag Erik
Hanestad Berit R
Weisaeth Lars
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health, Buskerud University College, Drammen, Norway. venke.johansen@isf.uib.no
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2006;60(6):452-62
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Catchment Area (Health)
Crime Victims - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Dissociative Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Emergency Medical Services - utilization
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aims of this study were to investigate acute and subacute post-traumatic reactions in victims of physical non-domestic violence. A Norwegian sample of 138 physically assaulted victims was interviewed and a questionnaire was completed. The following areas were examined: the frequency and intensity of acute and subacute psychological reactions such as peritraumatic dissociation (PD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and anxiety and depression; the relationship between several psychological reactions; the relationship between psychological reactions and level of physical injury, perceived life threat, and potential of severe physical injury, and the relationship between psychological reactions and socio-demographic variables. The following distress reactions were measured retrospectively: PD, PTSD, and anxiety and depression. Thirty-three per cent of the victims scored as probable PTSD cases according to the Post Traumatic Symptoms Scale 10 (PTSS-10); the corresponding Impact of Event Scale-15 (IES-15) score identified prevalence of 34% respectively. Forty-four per cent scored as cases with probable anxiety and depression, according to the Hopkins Symptom Check List 25 (HSCL-25). Severity of perceived threat predicted higher scores on all measures of psychological reactions. There were no statistically significant differences between acute and subacute groups on PD, PTSS-10, IES-15, IES-22 and HSCL-25 according to measured means (and standard deviations) and occurrence of probable cases and risk level cases. The results showed no connection between severity of physical injury and caseness. The acute psychological impairment that results from assault violence may have a deleterious effect on the mental health of victims.
PubMed ID
17162453 View in PubMed
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Adaptation and use of health services by primiparous women with urinary incontinence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163663
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2007 May-Jun;36(3):222-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
Edith Lepire
Marie Hatem
Author Affiliation
Université Laval, Québec, Québec, Canada. edithlepire@hotmail.com
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2007 May-Jun;36(3):222-30
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Health education
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Puerperal Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Quality of Life
Quebec
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Urinary Incontinence - epidemiology - therapy
Women's health
Abstract
To describe the use of health services by primiparous women with urinary incontinence by (a) examining the quality of life of these women and (b) describing the different predictors associated with their use of health services.
This correlative study is a secondary analysis of a broader epidemiologic study.
The 382 women identified as having urinary incontinence in the main epidemiologic study in Quebec, Canada.
Consultation rate; quality of life, predictors of quality of life, and use of health services; treatments received; and reasons for not seeking help.
Consultation rate was 11.1%. Many sociodemographic, clinical, and urinary incontinence factors were significantly associated with a decreased quality of life. Only frequency of nocturia, severe urinary incontinence, use of sanitary protection, and lower scores on the quality-of-life scale were significantly associated with differences in consultation rates. Physiotherapy was the most popular treatment received (71.4%). Most women with urinary incontinence did not consult because they considered urinary incontinence to be normal (47.3%).
Few women with urinary incontinence used health services for their urinary incontinence problem despite a decreased quality of life. Health professionals need to intervene early and promptly to help women with urinary incontinence deal more adequately with urinary incontinence and to inform women on how and where to seek help.
PubMed ID
17489928 View in PubMed
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Adult victims of sexual assault: acute medical response and police reporting among women consulting a center for victims of sexual assault.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71299
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2003 Aug;82(8):750-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Berit Schei
Katrine Sidenius
Lene Lundvall
Gyda Lolk Ottesen
Author Affiliation
Center for Victims of Sexual Assault, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. berit.schei@medisin.ntnu.no
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2003 Aug;82(8):750-5
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Crime Victims - psychology - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Delivery of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Denmark
Emergency Medical Services - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Outpatient clinics, hospital - statistics & numerical data
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Police - statistics & numerical data
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Sex Offenses - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Trauma Severity Indices
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The medical response to adult sexual assault should comprise: the collection of forensic evidence, the treatment of injuries, and follow-up counselling. In the past, victims of sexual assault reporting directly to the police may not have received this total medical care. The Copenhagen Center for Victims of Sexual Assault at Rigshospitalet, Denmark offers a 24-h service. Medical treatment and psychosocial follow up is offered independent of police reporting. The aim of this study was to assess whether adult sexual assault victims who reported to the police differed from those who did not report to the police. METHODS: Using clinical records, sociodemographics, characteristics of the assault, and type of preventive medical treatment received were obtained for 156 consecutive women consulting the Copenhagen Center (March 1st to December 31st 2000). Comparisons between characteristics of victims who reported to the police or not were determined. RESULTS: Ninety-four (60.2%) of the women reported to the police. Women who sought services within 24 h of the assault, had experienced use of force, were subjected to assault outdoors, and among whom nongenital injuries were observed were more likely to report to the police (p
PubMed ID
12848647 View in PubMed
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An investigation of the health beliefs and motivations of complementary medicine clients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188626
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2002 Sep;55(6):1025-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2002
Author
Fuschia M Sirois
Mary L Gick
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ont., Canada. fsirois@ccs.carleton.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2002 Sep;55(6):1025-37
Date
Sep-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Clinical Medicine - standards
Complementary Therapies - utilization
Disease - classification
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Needs Assessment
Ontario
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Patient satisfaction
Personality
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
The current study was concerned with factors associated with the use of complementary medicine (CM). The reasons for CM use were examined by dividing complementary medicine clients into two groups based on the frequency and length of their use of complementary therapies, and comparing them with conventional medicine clients as well as to each other. New/infrequent CM clients (n = 70), established CM clients (n = 71), and orthodox medicine clients (n = 58) were distinguished on the basis of health beliefs, socio-demographic, medical, and personality variables. Different patterns of predictors of CM use emerged depending on which client groups were compared. In general, health-aware behaviors and dissatisfaction with conventional medicine were the best predictors of overall and initial/ infrequent CM use, and more frequent health-aware behaviors were associated with continued CM use. Medical need also influenced the choice to use CM, and was the best predictor of committed CM use, with the established CM clients reporting more health problems than the new/infrequent CM group. Overall, income was a significant discriminator, but did not predict initial or continued CM use. Openness to new experience was associated with CM use in general, but was most notable in the decision to initially try or explore using CM. The findings support the utility of the three components (predisposing, enabling, and need factors) of the socio-behavioral model for explaining why some people choose CM. Overall, the results of the current study suggest that CM clients need to be looked at in more sophisticated ways, rather than being treated simply as a homogenous group with similar beliefs, motivations and needs.
PubMed ID
12220087 View in PubMed
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Are acceptance rates of a national preventive home visit programme for older people socially imbalanced?: a cross sectional study in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123849
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:396
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Yukari Yamada
Anette Ekmann
Charlotte Juul Nilsson
Mikkel Vass
Kirsten Avlund
Author Affiliation
Section of Social Medicine, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. yukari.yamada@upol.cz
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:396
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Financing, Personal - economics - statistics & numerical data
Geriatric Assessment
Health Services for the Aged - economics
Healthcare Disparities - economics
Home Care Services - economics - utilization
House Calls - utilization
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Physicians, Family - education - standards
Prevalence
Preventive Health Services - economics - methods
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Sex Distribution
Social Class
Abstract
Preventive home visits are offered to community dwelling older people in Denmark aimed at maintaining their functional ability for as long as possible, but only two thirds of older people accept the offer from the municipalities. The purpose of this study is to investigate 1) whether socioeconomic status was associated with acceptance of preventive home visits among older people and 2) whether municipality invitational procedures for the preventive home visits modified the association.
The study population included 1,023 community dwelling 80-year-old individuals from the Danish intervention study on preventive home visits. Information on preventive home visit acceptance rates was obtained from questionnaires. Socioeconomic status was measured by financial assets obtained from national registry data, and invitational procedures were identified through the municipalities. Logistic regression analyses were used, adjusted by gender.
Older persons with high financial assets accepted preventive home visits more frequently than persons with low assets (adjusted OR = 1.5 (CI95%: 1.1-2.0)). However, the association was attenuated when adjusted by the invitational procedures. The odds ratio for accepting preventive home visits was larger among persons with low financial assets invited by a letter with a proposed date than among persons with high financial assets invited by other procedures, though these estimates had wide confidence intervals.
High socioeconomic status was associated with a higher acceptance rate of preventive home visits, but the association was attenuated by invitational procedures. The results indicate that the social inequality in acceptance of publicly offered preventive services might decrease if municipalities adopt more proactive invitational procedures.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22656647 View in PubMed
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Are midwifery clients in Ontario making informed choices about prenatal screening?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104664
Source
Women Birth. 2014 Jun;27(2):86-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Vanessa Dixon
Nadya Burton
Author Affiliation
Midwifery Education Program at Ryerson University in Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. Electronic address: vanessa.dixon@ryerson.ca.
Source
Women Birth. 2014 Jun;27(2):86-90
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Choice Behavior
Decision Making
Female
Genetic Testing - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Guideline Adherence
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Informed consent
Internet
Midwifery - organization & administration
Mothers - psychology
Ontario
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care - methods
Prenatal Diagnosis - methods - utilization
Young Adult
Abstract
Informed choice is often lacking in women's decisions about prenatal screening.
The aim of this study is to evaluate how well midwives in Ontario, Canada are facilitating informed choice in this area.
An Internet-based survey was used to investigate 171 midwifery clients' knowledge, attitude towards and experience of prenatal genetic screening tests, and to determine the proportion of study participants who made an informed choice about prenatal screening.
All participants demonstrated adequate knowledge of prenatal screening. The vast majority (93.0%) of participants made an informed choice. Participants who chose to screen had lower knowledge scores than those who opted out of screening. Client satisfaction rates in regard to care received in this area ranged from 97% to 100%.
Results of this study suggest that Ontario midwives are effective in conveying information on prenatal genetic screening, contributing to high levels of client knowledge and satisfaction in comparison to similar studies in other jurisdictions.
PubMed ID
24656607 View in PubMed
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Assessing methods for measurement of clinical outcomes and quality of care in primary care practices.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122368
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:214
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Michael E Green
William Hogg
Colleen Savage
Sharon Johnston
Grant Russell
R Liisa Jaakkimainen
Richard H Glazier
Janet Barnsley
Richard Birtwhistle
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. michael.green@dfm.queensu.ca
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:214
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Chronic Disease - epidemiology - therapy
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diagnosis-Related Groups - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Medical Audit - methods
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - methods
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Patient Credit and Collection
Patients - psychology
Physicians, Family - psychology - standards
Preventive Health Services - economics - standards - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care - standards
Quality Indicators, Health Care
Social Class
Abstract
To evaluate the appropriateness of potential data sources for the population of performance indicators for primary care (PC) practices.
This project was a cross sectional study of 7 multidisciplinary primary care teams in Ontario, Canada. Practices were recruited and 5-7 physicians per practice agreed to participate in the study. Patients of participating physicians (20-30) were recruited sequentially as they presented to attend a visit. Data collection included patient, provider and practice surveys, chart abstraction and linkage to administrative data sets. Matched pairs analysis was used to examine the differences in the observed results for each indicator obtained using multiple data sources.
Seven teams, 41 physicians, 94 associated staff and 998 patients were recruited. The survey response rate was 81% for patients, 93% for physicians and 83% for associated staff. Chart audits were successfully completed on all but 1 patient and linkage to administrative data was successful for all subjects. There were significant differences noted between the data collection methods for many measures. No single method of data collection was best for all outcomes. For most measures of technical quality of care chart audit was the most accurate method of data collection. Patient surveys were more accurate for immunizations, chronic disease advice/information dispensed, some general health promotion items and possibly for medication use. Administrative data appears useful for indicators including chronic disease diagnosis and osteoporosis/ breast screening.
Multiple data collection methods are required for a comprehensive assessment of performance in primary care practices. The choice of which methods are best for any one particular study or quality improvement initiative requires careful consideration of the biases that each method might introduce into the results. In this study, both patients and providers were willing to participate in and consent to, the collection and linkage of information from multiple sources that would be required for such assessments.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22824551 View in PubMed
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Assessment of mammography experiences and satisfaction among American Indian/Alaska Native women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106365
Source
Womens Health Issues. 2013 Nov-Dec;23(6):e395-402
Publication Type
Article
Author
Florence M Ndikum-Moffor
Stacy Braiuca
Christine Makosky Daley
Byron J Gajewski
Kimberly K Engelman
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Medicine & Public Health, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas; University of Kansas Cancer Center, Kansas City, Kansas; Center for American Indian Community Health, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas. Electronic address: fndikum-moffor@kumc.edu.
Source
Womens Health Issues. 2013 Nov-Dec;23(6):e395-402
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska
Attitude to Health
Breast Neoplasms - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Community-Based Participatory Research
Early Detection of Cancer - psychology
Female
Focus Groups
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Mammography - psychology - utilization
Mass Screening - psychology - utilization
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Rural Population
Socioeconomic Factors
United States
United States Indian Health Service
Urban Population
Abstract
American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) women have lower breast cancer (BCA) screening and 5-year survival rates than non-Hispanic Whites. Understanding reasons for low screening rates is important to combatting later stage diagnoses. The purpose of this study was to assess mammography experiences and satisfaction among AI/AN women.
Nine focus groups were held with rural (N = 15) and urban (N = 38) AI/AN women 40 years and older in Kansas and Kansas City, Missouri, living both near and far from Indian Health Service (IHS) and tribal facilities, to examine experiences and satisfaction with mammography. Transcripts were coded and themes identified using a community-based participatory research approach.
Themes were classified under knowledge, communication, and awareness of BCA; barriers to mammography; mammogram facility size; impressions of mammogram technologist; motivations for getting a mammogram; and how to improve the mammogram experience. Participants had knowledge of prevention, but described cultural reasons for not discussing it and described better experiences in smaller facilities. Participants indicated having a mammogram technologist who was friendly, knowledgeable, respectful, competent, and explained the test was a determining factor in satisfaction. Other factors included family history, physician recommendation, and financial incentives. Barriers included transportation, cost, perceptions of prejudice, and time constraints. Participants on reservations or near IHS facilities preferred IHS over mainstream providers. Suggestions for improvement included caring technologists, better machines with less discomfort, and education.
Interventions to enhance the professionalism, empathy, and cultural awareness of mammogram technologists; reduce barriers; and provide positive expectations and incentives could improve satisfaction and compliance with screening mammography.
PubMed ID
24183414 View in PubMed
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Attendance, drug use patterns, and referrals made from North America's first supervised injection facility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171504
Source
Drug Alcohol Depend. 2006 Jul 27;83(3):193-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-27-2006
Author
Mark W Tyndall
Thomas Kerr
Ruth Zhang
Evelyn King
Julio G Montaner
Evan Wood
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, and BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, University of British Columbia, St. Paul's Hospital, 1081 Burrard Street, Vancouver, BC, Canada. mtyndall@cfenet.ubc.ca
Source
Drug Alcohol Depend. 2006 Jul 27;83(3):193-8
Date
Jul-27-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - epidemiology - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Adult
British Columbia
Cocaine-Related Disorders - epidemiology - ethnology - psychology - rehabilitation
Community Mental Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drug Overdose - epidemiology - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Female
HIV Infections - epidemiology - ethnology - psychology
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Heroin Dependence - epidemiology - ethnology - psychology - rehabilitation
Humans
Male
Needle Sharing - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data - trends
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Population Groups - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Street Drugs - poisoning
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers - organization & administration - utilization
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - epidemiology - ethnology - psychology - rehabilitation
Utilization Review - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
North America's first government sanctioned supervised injection facility (SIF) was opened in Vancouver in response to the serious health and social consequences of injection drug use and the perseverance of committed advocates and drug user groups who demanded change. This analysis was conducted to describe the attendance, demographic characteristics, drug use patterns, and referrals made during the first 18 months of operation.
As part of the evaluation strategy for the SIF, information is collected through a comprehensive on-site database designed to track attendance and the daily activities within the facility. All users of the SIF must sign a waiver form and are then entered into a database using a unique identifier of their choice. This identifier is used at each subsequent visit to provide a prospective record of attendance, drug use, and interventions.
From 10 March 2004 to 30 April 2005 inclusive, there were 4764 unique individuals who registered at the SIF. The facility successfully attracted a range of community injection drug users including women (23%) and members of the Aboriginal community (18%). Although heroin was used in 46% of all injections, cocaine was injected 37% of the time. There were 273 witnessed overdoses with no fatalities. During just 12 months of observation, 2171 individual referrals were made with the majority (37%) being referred for addiction counseling.
Vancouver's SIF has successfully been integrated into the community, has attracted a wide cross section of community injection drug users, has intervened in overdoses, and initiated over 2000 referrals to counseling and other support services. These findings should be useful for other settings considering SIF trials.
PubMed ID
16356659 View in PubMed
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149 records – page 1 of 15.