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A 10-year population-based study of people with multiple sclerosis in Stockholm, Sweden: use of and satisfaction with care and the value of different factors in predicting use of care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275585
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2015;15:480
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Charlotte Chruzander
Sverker Johansson
Kristina Gottberg
Ulrika Einarsson
Jan Hillert
Lotta Widén Holmqvist
Charlotte Ytterberg
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2015;15:480
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care - utilization
Disabled Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care - utilization
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The national strategy for treatment of chronic diseases - including MS - and changes in the Swedish welfare system, call for analyses of the use of, and patient satisfaction with, care in a long-term perspective. The aim was therefore to explore the use of care and the predictive value of personal factors, disease-specific factors and functioning on the use of care and to explore patient satisfaction with care in a 10-year perspective.
Information regarding personal factors, disease-specific factors, functioning and satisfaction with care was collected by home-visits; use of care was collected from the Stockholm County Council computerised register.
Data from 121 people with MS (PwMS) was collected. Primary care accounted for the majority of all care. Neurology and Rehabilitation Departments together accounted for two-thirds of all hospital outpatient care. Rehabilitation Departments accounted for one-third of the total number of inpatient days. Lower coping capacity, impaired manual dexterity and activity of daily living dependency at baseline, together with progress in MS disability predicted a higher use of care. Overall, patient satisfaction with care was stable over time.
The extensive use of care offers challenges to care coordination. Implementation of person-centred care could be a strategy to increase efficacy/outcome of care.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26499940 View in PubMed
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Acceptability of an eHealth Intervention to Prevent Alcohol-Exposed Pregnancy Among American Indian/Alaska Native Teens.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308304
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2020 01; 44(1):196-202
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
01-2020
Author
Jessica D Hanson
Tess L Weber
Umit Shrestha
Valerie J Bares
Michaela Seiber
Karen Ingersoll
Author Affiliation
University of Minnesota Duluth, Duluth, Minnesota.
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2020 01; 44(1):196-202
Date
01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alaskan Natives - ethnology - psychology
Alcohol Drinking - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Contraception - psychology
Early Medical Intervention - methods
Female
Health Risk Behaviors
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology - psychology
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Pregnancy
Telemedicine - methods
Abstract
A tribally led Changing High-Risk Alcohol Use and Increasing Contraception Effectiveness Study (CHOICES) Program has successfully decreased the risk of alcohol-exposed pregnancies (AEPs) among adult American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) women by either reducing risky drinking or increasing contraception use. However, a community needs assessment revealed a need to implement a similar intervention with AI/AN teens. The goal of the project was to develop and establish the acceptability of CHOICES for AI/AN teens.
Key informant interviews were conducted to review the existing OST CHOICES intervention. After modifications to the existing program, focus groups with AI/AN teens were conducted to ensure validity and to finalize the OST CHAT (CHOICES for American Indian Teens) intervention.
Key informant (N = 15) participants suggested that a Web-based intervention may increase teen engagement by making the intervention more interactive and visually stimulating. Based on this formative research, CHAT was developed via Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap). Feedback on the online CHAT curriculum was given by focus groups comprised of AI/AN adolescents, and participants felt that this type of intervention would be both acceptable and able to implement with a community of reservation-based teens.
This study outlines the development of a Web-based intervention for an AEP intervention for AI/AN teens and will inform future prevention efforts. Implications include an expansion of the evidence-based CHOICES intervention for AI/AN teens and also development of a Web-based intervention for rural, reservation-based AI/AN communities.
PubMed ID
31693195 View in PubMed
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The acceptability of physical activity programming within a smoking cessation service for individuals with severe mental illness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165975
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2007 Apr;66(1):123-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2007
Author
Guy Faulkner
Adrian Taylor
Shelly Munro
Peter Selby
Chris Gee
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Physical Education and Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. guy.faulkner@utoronto.ca
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2007 Apr;66(1):123-6
Date
Apr-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Making
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Exercise Therapy
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Nursing Methodology Research
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk Reduction Behavior
Schizophrenia - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Schizophrenic Psychology
Self Concept
Severity of Illness Index
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Smoking Cessation - psychology
Social Support
Abstract
There is a high prevalence of smoking and physical inactivity among individuals with severe mental illness (SMI). The current study assessed the acceptability of introducing physical activity, including perceived advantages and disadvantages, as an adjunct to a smoking cessation service within this population.
109 participants with SMI who were receiving smoking cessation treatment completed a survey assessing perceived interest in physical activity and a 24-item decisional balance questionnaire reflecting potential advantages and disadvantages of becoming more physically active.
The majority of the participants reported being interested in assistance in becoming more active [63% (69/109)]. The highest rated advantages reported were 'It would improve my health or reduce my risk of disease' and 'It would improve how I feel about myself'. Cost, and being active by oneself were the most frequently reported barriers.
This study suggests that many individuals with SMI seeking treatment for smoking cessation may also be receptive to assistance in becoming more physically active. Such individuals endorse both advantages and disadvantages more frequently than those not interested.
This study provides preliminary support for the acceptability of adding physical activity as a smoking cessation strategy with SMI individuals. Addressing salient barriers will be critical to integrating physical activity within this smoking cessation service.
PubMed ID
17184957 View in PubMed
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Acknowledging illness and treatment needs in first-time admitted psychiatric patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134522
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2011 Oct;26(7):446-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
K W Sorgaard
M. Nivison
V. Hansen
T. Oiesvold
Author Affiliation
Nordland Hospital Trust, 8092 Bodø, Norway. kso@nlsh.no
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2011 Oct;26(7):446-51
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Denial (Psychology)
Female
Health services needs and demand
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Mental Health Services - utilization
Middle Aged
Mood Disorders - psychology - therapy
Norway
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Questionnaires
Schizophrenia - therapy
Schizophrenic Psychology
Sick Role
Sickness Impact Profile
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Abstract
Help-seeking and service utilization depends on the patients' interpretation of their illness and treatment needs. Worry, denial of illness, need for treatment and need for hospitalization in first-time admitted patients was studied.
New patients in two mental hospitals were consecutively recruited. Three hundred and thirty-four satisfied the inclusion criteria and 251 gave informed consent. One hundred and ninety-six had complete datasets (56% of those eligible).
Demography was recorded with the Minimal Basic Dataset by Ruud et al. (1993). Experiences of hospitalisation were measured with the Patient's Experience of Hospitalisation Questionnaire by Carskey et al. (1992). MINI was used for diagnosing and SCL-90-R by Derogatis (1997) for subjective symptoms. Standard multiple regressions were performed with the PEH subscales (Denial, Worry, Need for treatment and Need for hospitalisation) as dependents and demography, diagnosis and SCL-90-R subscales as explanatory variables.
(a) Psychoticism and the diagnosis of schizophrenia were associated with little worrying, denial of illness, of treatment needs and of need for hospitalisation. (b) Anxiety and affective disorders were related to worries, acknowledgement of illness, need for treatment and for hospitalisation.
In contrast to patients with mainly anxiety and affective disorders, psychotic patient tended to deny illness-related worries, that they had an illness and that they needed treatment and hospitalisation. An affective disorder together with suicidal thoughts (not attempts) was a strong drive towards hospital admission.
PubMed ID
21570259 View in PubMed
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Acute forensic medical procedures used following a sexual assault among treatment-seeking women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175653
Source
Women Health. 2004;40(2):53-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Hester Dunlap
Paulette Brazeau
Lana Stermac
Mary Addison
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto at Sunnybrook and Women's College of Health Sciences Centre, Room 231, 7th Floor, 252 Bloor Street, West, Toronto, ON, M5S 1V6, Canada. hester_dunlap@camh.net
Source
Women Health. 2004;40(2):53-65
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Battered Women - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Crime Victims - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Forensic Pathology - standards
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Physical Examination
Rape - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Social Perception
Socioeconomic Factors
Women's Health Services - standards
Abstract
Despite the negative physical and mental health outcomes of sexual assault, a minority of sexually assaulted women seek immediate post-assault medical and legal services. This study identified the number and types of acute forensic medical procedures used by women presenting at a hospital-based urgent care centre between 1997 and 2001 within 72 hours following a reported sexual assault. The study also examined assault and non-assault factors associated with the use of procedures. It was hypothesized that assault characteristics resembling the stereotype of rape would be associated with the use of more procedures. The multiple regression indicated that injury severity, coercion severity, homelessness, and delay in presentation were significantly associated with the number of procedures received. Findings provide partial support for the hypothesis that post-assault procedures would be associated with the stereotype of rape, and highlight homeless women as a group particularly at risk for not receiving adequate medical treatment following a sexual assault.
PubMed ID
15778138 View in PubMed
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Acute posttraumatic stress: nonacceptance of early intervention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71884
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2001;62 Suppl 17:35-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
L. Weisaeth
Author Affiliation
Division of Disaster Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, University of Oslo, Norway. lars.weisath@psykiatri.uio.no
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2001;62 Suppl 17:35-40
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Occupational - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Acute Disease
Adaptation, Psychological
Anxiety - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Cooperative Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dreams - psychology
Explosions - statistics & numerical data
False Negative Reactions
False Positive Reactions
Fear - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Change Events
Male
Mass Screening - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Sleep Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Social Isolation - psychology
Startle Reaction - physiology
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
Psychological resistance may be of considerable importance in the posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) population, considering that researchers in the field of traumatic stress are frequently unsuccessful in achieving high response rates, that many subjects suffering from PTSD never seek help, and that dropouts from therapy are frequent. This article presents data on the main complaints reported in the acute aftermath of an industrial disaster by 246 employees who had been exposed to the disaster. The dominant concerns were symptomatic complaints related to posttraumatic stress reactions rather than external problems. Sleep disturbance, anxiety/fear responses, and physical symptoms were reported by individuals with complaints in the acute phase as most problematic, while irritability and depressive symptoms appeared very infrequently among the reported main complaints. A high specificity and sensitivity were achieved in predicting later PTSD (as defined by DSM-III criteria) by applying early response variables: thus, there were few false-positives and false-negatives. There was a considerable overlap between the PTSD predictors and the main symptom complaints. From a prevention point of view, this should be advantageous, since it would bring the right people to seek help. However, in a significant proportion of the acutely distressed, the reluctance to seek help was motivated by the very symptoms that predicted PTSD. Even a relatively high rate of subjects agreeing to be screened (82.8%) would have lost 42% of those who qualified for a diagnosis of PTSD, and more than half of the subjects with severe outcomes would not have been included. For primary and secondary prevention, the findings suggest that early screening and outreach should be very active.
PubMed ID
11495094 View in PubMed
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Acute psychological reactions in assault victims of non-domestic violence: peritraumatic dissociation, post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety and depression.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79450
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2006;60(6):452-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Johansen Venke A
Wahl Astrid K
Eilertsen Dag Erik
Hanestad Berit R
Weisaeth Lars
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Health, Buskerud University College, Drammen, Norway. venke.johansen@isf.uib.no
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2006;60(6):452-62
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Catchment Area (Health)
Crime Victims - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Dissociative Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Emergency Medical Services - utilization
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aims of this study were to investigate acute and subacute post-traumatic reactions in victims of physical non-domestic violence. A Norwegian sample of 138 physically assaulted victims was interviewed and a questionnaire was completed. The following areas were examined: the frequency and intensity of acute and subacute psychological reactions such as peritraumatic dissociation (PD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and anxiety and depression; the relationship between several psychological reactions; the relationship between psychological reactions and level of physical injury, perceived life threat, and potential of severe physical injury, and the relationship between psychological reactions and socio-demographic variables. The following distress reactions were measured retrospectively: PD, PTSD, and anxiety and depression. Thirty-three per cent of the victims scored as probable PTSD cases according to the Post Traumatic Symptoms Scale 10 (PTSS-10); the corresponding Impact of Event Scale-15 (IES-15) score identified prevalence of 34% respectively. Forty-four per cent scored as cases with probable anxiety and depression, according to the Hopkins Symptom Check List 25 (HSCL-25). Severity of perceived threat predicted higher scores on all measures of psychological reactions. There were no statistically significant differences between acute and subacute groups on PD, PTSS-10, IES-15, IES-22 and HSCL-25 according to measured means (and standard deviations) and occurrence of probable cases and risk level cases. The results showed no connection between severity of physical injury and caseness. The acute psychological impairment that results from assault violence may have a deleterious effect on the mental health of victims.
PubMed ID
17162453 View in PubMed
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Adaptation and use of health services by primiparous women with urinary incontinence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163663
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2007 May-Jun;36(3):222-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
Edith Lepire
Marie Hatem
Author Affiliation
Université Laval, Québec, Québec, Canada. edithlepire@hotmail.com
Source
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs. 2007 May-Jun;36(3):222-30
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Health education
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Puerperal Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Quality of Life
Quebec
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation - statistics & numerical data
Urinary Incontinence - epidemiology - therapy
Women's health
Abstract
To describe the use of health services by primiparous women with urinary incontinence by (a) examining the quality of life of these women and (b) describing the different predictors associated with their use of health services.
This correlative study is a secondary analysis of a broader epidemiologic study.
The 382 women identified as having urinary incontinence in the main epidemiologic study in Quebec, Canada.
Consultation rate; quality of life, predictors of quality of life, and use of health services; treatments received; and reasons for not seeking help.
Consultation rate was 11.1%. Many sociodemographic, clinical, and urinary incontinence factors were significantly associated with a decreased quality of life. Only frequency of nocturia, severe urinary incontinence, use of sanitary protection, and lower scores on the quality-of-life scale were significantly associated with differences in consultation rates. Physiotherapy was the most popular treatment received (71.4%). Most women with urinary incontinence did not consult because they considered urinary incontinence to be normal (47.3%).
Few women with urinary incontinence used health services for their urinary incontinence problem despite a decreased quality of life. Health professionals need to intervene early and promptly to help women with urinary incontinence deal more adequately with urinary incontinence and to inform women on how and where to seek help.
PubMed ID
17489928 View in PubMed
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Addressing oncofertility needs: views of female cancer patients in fertility preservation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124552
Source
J Psychosoc Oncol. 2012;30(3):331-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Samantha Yee
Kaajal Abrol
Melanie McDonald
Madeline Tonelli
Kimberly E Liu
Author Affiliation
Centre for Fertility and Reproductive Health, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada. syee@mtsinai.on.ca
Source
J Psychosoc Oncol. 2012;30(3):331-46
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Female
Fertility Preservation
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Neoplasms - therapy
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Survivors - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
A total of 41 questionnaires were returned from 64 respondents who consented to receive a questionnaire through the mail. Almost all valued the opportunity to receive consultation to address their fertility concerns and discuss fertility preservation options. Psychological stress, time pressure, and costs were identified as main factors affecting respondents' decision to proceed with in-vitro fertilization to cryopreserve oocytes or embryos. About one third indicated that the discussion of fertility matters was initiated by themselves, their friends, and families rather than their health care providers. The findings have identified several major barriers encountered by female cancer patients when seeking fertility preservation services.
PubMed ID
22571247 View in PubMed
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Addressing the burden of post-conflict surgical disease - strategies from the North Caucasus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135930
Source
Glob Public Health. 2011;6(6):669-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Karsten Lunze
Fatima I Lunze
Author Affiliation
Preventive Medicine, Boston University, Boston, MA, USA. karsten.lunze@post.harvard.edu
Source
Glob Public Health. 2011;6(6):669-77
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Altruism
Blast Injuries - complications - psychology - surgery
Capacity Building - methods
Child
Disaster Planning - methods - standards
Ear, Middle - injuries - surgery
Explosions
General Surgery - manpower
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
International Cooperation
Needs Assessment
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Prisoners - statistics & numerical data
Russia
Schools
Surgical Procedures, Operative
Terrorism
War
Abstract
The 2004 terror attack on a school in Beslan, North Caucasus, with more than 1300 children and their families taken hostage and 334 people killed, ended after extreme violence. Following the disaster, many survivors with blast ear injuries developed complications because no microsurgery services were available in the region. Here, we present our strategies in North Ossetia to strengthen subspecialty surgical care in a region of instable security conditions. Disaster modifies disease burden in an environment of conflict-related health-care limitations. We built on available secondary care and partnered international with local stakeholders to reach and treat victims of a humanitarian disaster. A strategy of mutual commitment resulted in treatment of all consenting Beslan victims with blast trauma sequelae and of non disaster-related patients. Credible, sustained partnerships and needs assessments beyond the immediate phases after a disaster are essential to facilitate a meaningful transition from humanitarian aid to capacity building exceeding existing insufficient standards. Psychosocial impacts of disaster might constitute a barrier to care and need to be assessed when responding to the burden of surgical disease in conflict or post-conflict settings. Involving local citizen groups in the planning process can be useful to identify and access vulnerable populations. Integration of our strategy into broader efforts might strengthen the local health system through management and leadership.
PubMed ID
21432701 View in PubMed
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369 records – page 1 of 37.