Skip header and navigation

Refine By

146 records – page 1 of 15.

The 2009 H1N1 pandemic response in remote First Nation communities of Subarctic Ontario: barriers and improvements from a health care services perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130157
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):564-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Nadia A Charania
Leonard J S Tsuji
Author Affiliation
Department of Environment and Resource Studies, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada. ncharani@uwaterloo.ca
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):564-75
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Catchment Area (Health)
Federal Government
Female
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control
Information Dissemination
Male
Medically underserved area
Middle Aged
Ontario
Pandemics - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Professional-Patient Relations
Retrospective Studies
Rural health services - organization & administration
Abstract
To retrospectively examine the barriers faced and opportunities for improvement during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic response experienced by participants responsible for the delivery of health care services in 3 remote and isolated Subarctic First Nation communities of northern Ontario, Canada.
A qualitative community-based participatory approach.
Semi-directed interviews were conducted with adult key informants (n=13) using purposive sampling of participants representing the 3 main sectors responsible for health care services (i.e., federal health centres, provincial hospitals and Band Councils). Data were manually transcribed and coded using deductive and inductive thematic analysis.
Primary barriers reported were issues with overcrowding in houses, insufficient human resources and inadequate community awareness. Main areas for improvement included increasing human resources (i.e., nurses and trained health care professionals), funding for supplies and general community awareness regarding disease processes and prevention.
Government bodies should consider focusing efforts to provide more support in terms of human resources, monies and education. In addition, various government organizations should collaborate to improve housing conditions and timely access to resources. These recommendations should be addressed in future pandemic plans, so that remote western James Bay First Nation communities of Subarctic Ontario and other similar communities can be better prepared for the next public health emergency.
PubMed ID
22030007 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aboriginal users of Canadian quitlines: an exploratory analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160066
Source
Tob Control. 2007 Dec;16 Suppl 1:i60-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Lynda M Hayward
H Sharon Campbell
Carol Sutherland-Brown
Author Affiliation
Centre for Behavioural Research and Program Evaluation, Lyle S Hallman Institute, Room 1717A, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, N2L 3G1. lhayward@healthy.uwaterloo.ca
Source
Tob Control. 2007 Dec;16 Suppl 1:i60-4
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Counseling - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hotlines - utilization
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Patient satisfaction
Smoking - ethnology - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - ethnology - methods - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To conduct an exploratory, comparative study of the utilisation and effectiveness of tobacco cessation quitlines among aboriginal and non-aboriginal Canadian smokers.
Population based quitlines that provide free cessation information, advice and counselling to Canadian smokers.
First time quitline callers, age 18 years of age and over, who called the quitline between August 2001 and December 2005 and who completed the evaluation and provided data on their ethnic status (n = 7082).
Demographic characteristics and tobacco behaviours of participants at intake and follow-up; reasons for calling; actions taken toward quitting, and 6-month follow-up quit rates.
7% of evaluation participants in the time period reported aboriginal origins. Aboriginal participants were younger than non-aboriginals but had similar smoking status and level of addiction at intake. Concern about future health and current health problems were the most common reasons aboriginal participants called. Six months after intake aboriginals and non-aboriginals had taken similar actions with 57% making a 24-hour quit attempt. Quit rates were higher for aboriginals than non-aboriginals, particularly for men. The 6-month prolonged abstinence rate for aboriginal men was 16.7% compared with 7.2% for aboriginal women and 9.4% and 8.3% for non-aboriginal men and women, respectively.
This exploratory analysis showed that even without targeted promotion, aboriginal smokers do call Canadian quitlines, primarily for health related reasons. We also showed that the quitlines are effective at helping them to quit. As a population focused intervention, quitlines can reach a large proportion of smokers in a cost efficient manner. In aboriginal communities where smoking rates exceed 50% and multiple health risks and chronic diseases already exist, eliminating non-ceremonial tobacco use must be a priority. Our results, although exploratory, suggest quitlines can be an effective addition to aboriginal tobacco cessation strategies.
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2002 Oct 3;347(14):1087-9312362011
Cites: Nicotine Tob Res. 2003 Feb;5(1):13-2512745503
Cites: Br J Addict. 1991 Sep;86(9):1119-271932883
Cites: Tob Control. 2007 Dec;16 Suppl 1:i3-818048627
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1999 Sep;89(9):1322-710474547
Cites: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2005 Nov 11;54(44):1121-416280969
Cites: Tob Control. 2007 Dec;16 Suppl 1:i16-2018048624
Cites: Health Rep. 1992;4(1):7-241391655
PubMed ID
18048634 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acceptability of a web-based community reinforcement approach for substance use disorders with treatment-seeking American Indians/Alaska Natives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270301
Source
Community Ment Health J. 2015 May;51(4):393-403
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Aimee N C Campbell
Eva Turrigiano
Michelle Moore
Gloria M Miele
Traci Rieckmann
Mei-Chen Hu
Frankie Kropp
Roz Ringor-Carty
Edward V Nunes
Source
Community Ment Health J. 2015 May;51(4):393-403
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Internet
Interviews as Topic
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Qualitative Research
Substance-Related Disorders - ethnology - therapy
Therapy, Computer-Assisted - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
Longstanding disparities in substance use disorders and treatment access exist among American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/AN). Computerized, web-delivered interventions have potential to increase access to quality treatment and improve patient outcomes. Prior research supports the efficacy of a web-based version [therapeutic education system (TES)] of the community reinforcement approach to improve outcomes among outpatients in substance abuse treatment; however, TES has not been tested among AI/AN. The results from this mixed method acceptability study among a diverse sample of urban AI/AN (N = 40) show that TES was acceptable across seven indices (range 7.8-9.4 on 0-10 scales with 10 indicating highest acceptability). Qualitative interviews suggest adaptation specific to AI/AN culture could improve adoption. Additional efforts to adapt TES and conduct a larger effectiveness study are warranted.
Notes
Cites: Contemp Clin Trials. 2012 Mar;33(2):386-9522085803
Cites: J Psychoactive Drugs. 2011 Oct-Dec;43(4):291-622400459
Cites: J Psychoactive Drugs. 2011 Oct-Dec;43(4):319-2422400463
Cites: Annu Rev Clin Psychol. 2012;8:131-6022149479
Cites: J Addict Dis. 2012;31(3):313-822873192
Cites: Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2012 Sep;38(5):372-522931068
Cites: Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2012 Sep;38(5):376-8222931069
Cites: Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2012 Sep;38(5):483-9222931083
Cites: Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2001;10(2):67-8411698984
Cites: J Subst Abuse Treat. 2003 Sep;25(2):117-2114680015
Cites: Alcohol. 2004 Jan;32(1):37-4315066702
Cites: Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 Apr;69(4 Suppl):755S-759S10195598
Cites: Lancet. 1999 May 15;353(9165):1657-6110335785
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2005 Jan;62(1):99-10815630077
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2005 Nov 3;353(18):1881-316267317
Cites: J Pers Assess. 2006 Apr;86(2):150-6116599789
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2006 May;96(5):889-9616571710
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2007 May;64(5):566-7617485608
Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2007 Jul;64(7):830-4217606817
Cites: Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2011 Sep;37(5):333-821854275
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2011 Aug;168(8):790-921536689
Cites: Med J Aust. 2011 Aug 1;195(3):S44-5021806518
Cites: Implement Sci. 2011;6:6321679438
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 2011 May 1;115(1-2):74-921131143
Cites: J Addict Dis. 2011 Jan;30(1):63-7421218312
Cites: Vital Health Stat 10. 2009 Dec;(242):1-15720821903
Cites: Curr Psychiatry Rep. 2010 Oct;12(5):426-3220683681
Cites: Exp Clin Psychopharmacol. 2008 Apr;16(2):132-4318489017
Cites: Am J Addict. 2001;10 Suppl:51-911268821
Cites: Addiction. 2000 Nov;95(11):1712-511219379
Cites: J Ethn Subst Abuse. 2009;8(3):283-30020157631
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2014 Jun;171(6):683-9024700332
Cites: JAMA Psychiatry. 2014 May;71(5):566-7224671165
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2014 Apr;171(4):436-4424577287
Cites: Alcohol Res Health. 2010;33(1-2):152-6021209793
Cites: Community Ment Health J. 2013 Dec;49(6):714-2122843125
Cites: J Subst Abuse Treat. 2014 Jan;46(1):43-5124060350
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2008 Jul;165(7):881-818450927
PubMed ID
25022913 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acceptance of screening and completion of treatment for latent tuberculosis infection among refugee claimants in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179817
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2004 Jun;8(6):711-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
J F Levesque
P. Dongier
P. Brassard
R. Allard
Author Affiliation
Direction des systèmes de soins et services, Institut national de santé publique du Québec, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. jflevesq@sentepub-mtl.qc.ca
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2004 Jun;8(6):711-7
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Antitubercular Agents - administration & dosage
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Humans
Isoniazid - administration & dosage
Logistic Models
Male
Mass Chest X-Ray
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Primary Health Care
Quebec - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Refugees - psychology
Tuberculin Test - utilization
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - diagnosis - drug therapy - ethnology
Abstract
Primary care clinic for refugee claimants, Montreal, Canada.
To identify factors linked to the acceptance of the tuberculin skin test (TST), and assess completion of treatment for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI).
Asylum seekers consulting for a medical complaint or medical immigration examination between February and October 1999 were assessed for eligibility. Personal and clinical information was gathered prospectively by questionnaire. Hospital files were reviewed to assess completion of LTBI treatment.
In our study, 296 subjects (72.4% of 409 eligible) were offered TST, of whom 227 accepted (76.7%). Of these, 49 (24.9%) had a TST > or = 10 mm and 24 (49%) completed 6 months of LTBI treatment. Logistic regression models showed that patients who had never had a TST (OR 3.2, 95%CI 1.34-7.6) or had no temporary exclusion criteria (OR 4.0, 95%CI 1.6-9.9) were more likely to accept TST. Perceiving tuberculosis as a severe disease (OR 0.29, 95%CI 0.09-0.91) and consulting for an immigration examination (OR 0.42, 95%CI 0.18-0.98) was associated with refusal of TST. Increasing age was found to be independently associated with a positive TST (OR 1.06, 95%CI 1.01-1.12). Variability in the proportion of positive results was found between TST readers.
This study supports the feasibility of screening refugee claimants for LTBI during medical consultation and of developing organizational links to ensure completion of LTBI treatment.
PubMed ID
15182140 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acceptance of treatment for latent tuberculosis infection: prospective cohort study in the United States and Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115630
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2013 Apr;17(4):473-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
P W Colson
Y. Hirsch-Moverman
J. Bethel
P. Vempaty
K. Salcedo
K. Wall
W. Miranda
S. Collins
C R Horsburgh
Author Affiliation
Charles P Felton National Tuberculosis Center, International Center for AIDS Care and Treatment Programs, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027, USA. pwc2@columbia.edu
Source
Int J Tuberc Lung Dis. 2013 Apr;17(4):473-9
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antitubercular Agents - therapeutic use
Appointments and Schedules
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada - epidemiology
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Latent Tuberculosis - diagnosis - drug therapy - ethnology
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Treatment Refusal
United States - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
An estimated 300?000 individuals are treated for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in the United States and Canada annually. Little is known about the proportion or characteristics of those who decline treatment.
To define the proportion of individuals in various groups who accept LTBI treatment and to identify factors associated with non-acceptance of treatment.
Persons offered LTBI treatment at 30 clinics in 12 Tuberculosis Epidemiologic Studies Consortium sites were prospectively enrolled. Multivariate regression models were constructed based on manual stepwise assessment of potential predictors.
Of 1692 participants enrolled from March 2007 to September 2008, 1515 (89.5%) accepted treatment and 177 (10.5%) declined. Predictors of acceptance included believing one could personally spread TB germs, having greater TB knowledge, finding clinic schedules convenient and having low acculturation. Predictors of non-acceptance included being a health care worker, being previously recommended for treatment and believing that taking medicines would be problematic.
This is the first prospective multisite study to examine predictors of LTBI treatment acceptance in general clinic populations. Greater efforts should be made to increase acceptance among health care workers, those previously recommended for treatment and those who expect problems with LTBI medicines. Ensuring convenient clinic schedules and TB education to increase knowledge could be important for ensuring acceptance.
PubMed ID
23485381 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acculturation and cancer information preferences of Spanish-speaking immigrant women to Canada: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147531
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2009 Dec;30(12):1131-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Maria D Thomson
Laurie Hoffman-Goetz
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, Department of Health Studies and Gerontology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Health Care Women Int. 2009 Dec;30(12):1131-51
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Communication Barriers
Cultural Characteristics
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Female
Health Behavior - ethnology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hispanic Americans - psychology
Humans
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - ethnology - prevention & control - psychology
Ontario
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Questionnaires
Social Change
Socioeconomic Factors
Women's Health - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore the cancer information preferences of immigrant women by their level of acculturation we conducted interviews with 34 Spanish-speaking English-as-a-second-language (ESL) women. Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests were used to look for differences by acculturation. Four themes were identified: What is prevention? What should I do; sources of my cancer information, strategies I use to better understand, and identifying and closing my health knowledge gaps. Acculturation did not differentiate immigrant women's cancer information sources, preferences, or strategies used to address language barriers. We suggest the effect of acculturation is neither direct nor simple and may reflect other factors including self-efficacy.
PubMed ID
19894155 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol dependence among Alaskan natives and their health care utilization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9637
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2003 Aug;27(8):1353-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2003
Author
Victor M Hesselbrock
Michie N Hesselbrock
Bernard Segal
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, Connecticut 06030-2103, USA. hesselb@psychiatry.uchc.edu
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2003 Aug;27(8):1353-5
Date
Aug-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Alcoholism - ethnology - therapy
Humans
Inuits
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
PubMed ID
12966338 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of dissociation in Bosnian treatment-seeking refugees in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268448
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2015 May;69(4):307-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Sabina Palic
Jessica Carlsson
Cherie Armour
Ask Elklit
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2015 May;69(4):307-14
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Bosnia and Herzegovina - ethnology
Denmark - ethnology
Dissociative Disorders - diagnosis - ethnology - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology - psychology
Refugees - psychology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Dissociative experiences are common in traumatized individuals, and can sometimes be mistaken for psychosis. It is difficult to identify pathological dissociation in the treatment of traumatized refugees, because there is a lack of systematic clinical descriptions of dissociative phenomena in refugees. Furthermore, we are currently unaware of how dissociation measures perform in this clinical group.
To describe the phenomenology of dissociative symptoms in Bosnian treatment-seeking refugees in Denmark.
As a part of a larger study, dissociation was assessed systematically in 86 Bosnian treatment-seeking refugees using a semi-structured clinical interview (Structured Interview for Disorders of Extreme Stress-dissociation subscale; SIDES-D) and a self-report scale (Dissociative Experiences Scale; DES).
The SIDES-D indicated twice as high prevalence of pathological dissociation as the DES. According to the DES, 30% of the refugees had pathological dissociation 15 years after their resettlement. On the SIDES-D, depersonalization and derealization experiences were the most common. Also, questions about depersonalization and derealization at times elicited reporting of visual and perceptual hallucinations, which were unrelated to traumatic re-experiencing. Questions about personality alteration elicited spontaneous reports of a phenomenon of "split" pre- and post-war identity in the refugee group. Whether this in fact is a dissociative phenomenon, characteristic of severe traumatization in adulthood, needs further examination.
Knowledge of dissociative symptoms in traumatized refugees is important in clinical settings to prevent misclassification and to better target psychotherapeutic interventions. Much development in the measurement of dissociation in refugees is needed.
PubMed ID
25415764 View in PubMed
Less detail

Barriers, supports, and effective interventions for uptake of human papillomavirus- and other vaccines within global and Canadian Indigenous peoples: a systematic review protocol.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296896
Source
Syst Rev. 2018 03 02; 7(1):40
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Date
03-02-2018
Author
Kelly J Mrklas
Shannon MacDonald
Melissa A Shea-Budgell
Nancy Bedingfield
Heather Ganshorn
Sarah Glaze
Lea Bill
Bonnie Healy
Chyloe Healy
Juliet Guichon
Amy Colquhoun
Christopher Bell
Ruth Richardson
Rita Henderson
James Kellner
Cheryl Barnabe
Robert A Bednarczyk
Angeline Letendre
Gregg S Nelson
Author Affiliation
Research Innovation and Analytics, Alberta Health Services, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Syst Rev. 2018 03 02; 7(1):40
Date
03-02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Keywords
Canada
Female
Health Services, Indigenous
Humans
Papillomavirus Infections - prevention & control
Papillomavirus Vaccines - administration & dosage
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Population Groups - ethnology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - prevention & control
Vaccination
Abstract
Despite the existence of human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccines with demonstrated safety and effectiveness and funded HPV vaccination programs, coverage rates are persistently lower and cervical cancer burden higher among Canadian Indigenous peoples. Barriers and supports to HPV vaccination in Indigenous peoples have not been systematically documented, nor have interventions to increase uptake in this population. This protocol aims to appraise the literature in Canadian and global Indigenous peoples, relating to documented barriers and supports to vaccination and interventions to increase acceptability/uptake or reduce hesitancy of vaccination. Although HPV vaccination is the primary focus, we anticipate only a small number of relevant studies to emerge from the search and will, therefore, employ a broad search strategy to capture literature related to both HPV vaccination and vaccination in general in global Indigenous peoples.
Eligible studies will include global Indigenous peoples and discuss barriers or supports and/or interventions to improve uptake or to reduce hesitancy, for the HPV vaccine and/or other vaccines. Primary outcomes are documented barriers or supports or interventions. All study designs meeting inclusion criteria will be considered, without restricting by language, location, or data type. We will use an a priori search strategy, comprised of key words and controlled vocabulary terms, developed in consultation with an academic librarian, and reviewed by a second academic librarian using the PRESS checklist. We will search several electronic databases from date of inception, without restrictions. A pre-defined group of global Indigenous websites will be reviewed for relevant gray literature. Bibliographic searches will be conducted for all included studies to identify relevant reviews. Data analysis will include an inductive, qualitative, thematic synthesis and a quantitative analysis of measured barriers and supports, as well as a descriptive synthesis and quantitative summary of measures for interventions.
To our knowledge, this study will contribute the first systematic review of documented barriers, supports, and interventions for vaccination in general and for HPV vaccination. The results of this study are expected to inform future research, policies, programs, and community-driven initiatives to enhance acceptability and uptake of HPV vaccination among Indigenous peoples.
PROSPERO Registration Number: CRD42017048844.
PubMed ID
29499749 View in PubMed
Less detail

Barriers to providing effective mental health services to American Indians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191397
Source
Ment Health Serv Res. 2001 Dec;3(4):215-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
J L Johnson
M C Cameron
Author Affiliation
School of Social Work, University at Buffalo, New York 14260-1050, USA. jj44@acsu.buffalo.edu
Source
Ment Health Serv Res. 2001 Dec;3(4):215-23
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Culture
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Mental Disorders - ethnology - therapy
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Prejudice
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
Like most indigenous populations throughout the world who have undergone innumerable cultural changes, the mental health care needs of American Indians are great. Some surveys conducted by the Indian Health Service show high rates of suicide, mortality, depression and substance abuse. Little is known about effective mental health care among American Indians due, in part, to the lack of culturally appropriate models of mental health in American Indians. This article presents a cultural framework in order to understand the mental health care needs of American Indians and discusses barriers to providing effective mental health services to American Indians.
PubMed ID
11859967 View in PubMed
Less detail

146 records – page 1 of 15.