Skip header and navigation

Refine By

1693 records – page 1 of 170.

1,005 delayed days: a study of adult psychiatric discharge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244608
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1981 Apr;32(4):266-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1981
Author
P A Barrette
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1981 Apr;32(4):266-8
Date
Apr-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Hospitals, Community
Hospitals, Psychiatric - organization & administration
Humans
Length of Stay
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Patient Discharge
Abstract
Delay in discharge of psychiatric patients frequently is attributed to the lack of available community resources, or to the unwillingness of the patient or his family to accept discharge or transfer to another facility. The role of the psychiatric system itself rarely is mentioned as a factor. A study of 138 psychiatric patients in a Canadian community hospital in 1978 showed that 35 per cent were judged to be delayed in their discharge. By far the greatest source of delay was the administration of the various psychiatric services within the system. Delayed patients were found to be statistically similar to nondelayed patients, except for the delayed patients tendency to be poorer and to be overrepresented on two of the six wards studied. The cost implications of the delays in discharge are discussed, as are suggestions for solving the problems within the administrative framework.
PubMed ID
7227988 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 5-year follow-up study of 117 battered women

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68577
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1991 Nov;81(11):1486-1489
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1991
  1 website  
Author
Bergman, B
Brismar, B
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Huddinge Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1991 Nov;81(11):1486-1489
Date
Nov-1991
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Marriage
Mental Health Services - utilization
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Spouse Abuse - epidemiology - psychology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
This paper reports register data concerning somatic and psychiatric hospital care on 117 battered women who were identified in a surgical emergency department and offered a treatment program. Data were collected during a period of 10 years before to 5 years after the battering in question. It was concluded that the battered woman seeks hospital care much more than the average woman of the same age. It is, however, not only traumatic injuries that bring her to the hospital, but also medical, gynecological, psychiatric, and unspecified disorders and suicide attempts. In this study it was hypothesized that this overuse of hospital care reflects the situation at home characterized by ongoing battering and other psychosocial problems. During the 5 years following the battering, the women did not show any signs of reducing their use of hospital care. It is alarming that this high use of medical care continues over years, and doctors should consider battering as one possible explanation for this phenomenon.
PubMed ID
1951810 View in PubMed
Online Resources
Less detail

A 5-year follow-up study of adolescents who sought treatment for substance misuse in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107628
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2014 May;23(5):347-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Sheilagh Hodgins
Sara Lövenhag
Mattias Rehn
Kent W Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Maria-Ungdom Research Centre, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2014 May;23(5):347-60
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Antisocial Personality Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Crime - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Parents
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Poverty - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Population
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Previous studies have shown that substance misuse in adolescence is associated with increased risks of hospitalizations for mental and physical disorders, convictions for crimes, poverty, and premature death from age 21 to 50. The present study examined 180 adolescent boys and girls who sought treatment for substance misuse in Sweden. The adolescents and their parents were assessed independently when the adolescents first contacted the clinic to diagnose mental disorders and collect information on maltreatment and antisocial behavior. Official criminal files were obtained. Five years later, 147 of the ex-clients again completed similar assessments. The objectives were (1) to document the prevalence of alcohol use disorders (AUD) and drug use disorders (DUD) in early adulthood; and (2) to identify family and individual factors measured in adolescence that predicted these disorders, after taking account of AUD and DUD in adolescence and treatment. Results showed that AUD, DUD, and AUD + DUD present in mid-adolescence were in most cases also present in early adulthood. Prediction models detected no positive effect of treatment in limiting persistence of these disorders. Thus, treatment-as-usual provided by the only psychiatric service for adolescents with substance misuse in a large urban center in Sweden failed to prevent the persistence of substance misuse. Despite extensive clinical assessments of the ex-clients and their parents, few factors assessed in mid-adolescence were associated with substance misuse disorders 5 years later. It may be that family and individual factors in early life promote the mental disorders that precede adolescent substance misuse.
PubMed ID
23989597 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 10-year population-based study of people with multiple sclerosis in Stockholm, Sweden: use of and satisfaction with care and the value of different factors in predicting use of care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275585
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2015;15:480
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Charlotte Chruzander
Sverker Johansson
Kristina Gottberg
Ulrika Einarsson
Jan Hillert
Lotta Widén Holmqvist
Charlotte Ytterberg
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2015;15:480
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care - utilization
Disabled Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care - utilization
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The national strategy for treatment of chronic diseases - including MS - and changes in the Swedish welfare system, call for analyses of the use of, and patient satisfaction with, care in a long-term perspective. The aim was therefore to explore the use of care and the predictive value of personal factors, disease-specific factors and functioning on the use of care and to explore patient satisfaction with care in a 10-year perspective.
Information regarding personal factors, disease-specific factors, functioning and satisfaction with care was collected by home-visits; use of care was collected from the Stockholm County Council computerised register.
Data from 121 people with MS (PwMS) was collected. Primary care accounted for the majority of all care. Neurology and Rehabilitation Departments together accounted for two-thirds of all hospital outpatient care. Rehabilitation Departments accounted for one-third of the total number of inpatient days. Lower coping capacity, impaired manual dexterity and activity of daily living dependency at baseline, together with progress in MS disability predicted a higher use of care. Overall, patient satisfaction with care was stable over time.
The extensive use of care offers challenges to care coordination. Implementation of person-centred care could be a strategy to increase efficacy/outcome of care.
Notes
Cites: J Neurol Sci. 2014 Apr 15;339(1-2):57-6324492009
Cites: Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2000 Aug;81(8):1034-810943751
Cites: Scand J Rehabil Med. 2000 Dec;32(4):173-911201624
Cites: Med Care. 1978 Apr;16(4):327-36651398
Cites: Neurology. 1983 Nov;33(11):1444-526685237
Cites: Int Rehabil Med. 1985;7(4):176-814093249
Cites: J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 1987 Jun;50(6):714-93612152
Cites: Scand J Rehabil Med. 1991;23(4):193-2021785028
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1993 Mar;36(6):725-338480217
Cites: Scand J Caring Sci. 1993;7(1):3-108502852
Cites: Neurology. 1996 Apr;46(4):907-118780061
Cites: J Pers Assess. 1996 Dec;67(3):588-978991972
Cites: Neurology. 1998 Jun;50(6):1594-6009633699
Cites: Md State Med J. 1965 Feb;14:61-514258950
Cites: Mult Scler. 2005 Jun;11(3):328-3715957516
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2006;(1):CD00443116437487
Cites: Mult Scler. 2006 Jun;12(3):340-5316764349
Cites: J Rehabil Med. 2006 Jul;38(4):230-616801205
Cites: Eur J Health Econ. 2006 Sep;7 Suppl 2:S75-8517310342
Cites: J Adv Nurs. 2007 Apr;58(1):11-2217394612
Cites: BMC Neurol. 2008;8:3618823543
Cites: Pharmacoeconomics. 2008;26(10):847-6018793032
Cites: Can J Neurol Sci. 2007 May;34(2):167-7417598593
Cites: J Neurol. 2008 Sep;255(9):1354-6018677639
Cites: Mult Scler. 2009 Jan;15(1):88-9518701570
Cites: Brain. 2009 May;132(Pt 5):1175-8919339255
Cites: J Manag Care Pharm. 2010 Nov-Dec;16(9):703-1221067256
Cites: J Neurol Sci. 2013 Sep 15;332(1-2):121-723896259
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2013;13:36524074396
Cites: J Neurol Sci. 2013 Dec 15;335(1-2):42-724183855
Cites: J Med Philos. 2008 Jun;33(3):241-6118567905
Cites: Mult Scler. 2008 Aug;14(7):962-7118573818
PubMed ID
26499940 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2009 H1N1 pandemic response in remote First Nation communities of Subarctic Ontario: barriers and improvements from a health care services perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130157
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):564-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Nadia A Charania
Leonard J S Tsuji
Author Affiliation
Department of Environment and Resource Studies, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada. ncharani@uwaterloo.ca
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):564-75
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Catchment Area (Health)
Federal Government
Female
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control
Information Dissemination
Male
Medically underserved area
Middle Aged
Ontario
Pandemics - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Professional-Patient Relations
Retrospective Studies
Rural health services - organization & administration
Abstract
To retrospectively examine the barriers faced and opportunities for improvement during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic response experienced by participants responsible for the delivery of health care services in 3 remote and isolated Subarctic First Nation communities of northern Ontario, Canada.
A qualitative community-based participatory approach.
Semi-directed interviews were conducted with adult key informants (n=13) using purposive sampling of participants representing the 3 main sectors responsible for health care services (i.e., federal health centres, provincial hospitals and Band Councils). Data were manually transcribed and coded using deductive and inductive thematic analysis.
Primary barriers reported were issues with overcrowding in houses, insufficient human resources and inadequate community awareness. Main areas for improvement included increasing human resources (i.e., nurses and trained health care professionals), funding for supplies and general community awareness regarding disease processes and prevention.
Government bodies should consider focusing efforts to provide more support in terms of human resources, monies and education. In addition, various government organizations should collaborate to improve housing conditions and timely access to resources. These recommendations should be addressed in future pandemic plans, so that remote western James Bay First Nation communities of Subarctic Ontario and other similar communities can be better prepared for the next public health emergency.
PubMed ID
22030007 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aboriginal users of Canadian quitlines: an exploratory analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160066
Source
Tob Control. 2007 Dec;16 Suppl 1:i60-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Lynda M Hayward
H Sharon Campbell
Carol Sutherland-Brown
Author Affiliation
Centre for Behavioural Research and Program Evaluation, Lyle S Hallman Institute, Room 1717A, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, N2L 3G1. lhayward@healthy.uwaterloo.ca
Source
Tob Control. 2007 Dec;16 Suppl 1:i60-4
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Counseling - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hotlines - utilization
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Patient satisfaction
Smoking - ethnology - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - ethnology - methods - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To conduct an exploratory, comparative study of the utilisation and effectiveness of tobacco cessation quitlines among aboriginal and non-aboriginal Canadian smokers.
Population based quitlines that provide free cessation information, advice and counselling to Canadian smokers.
First time quitline callers, age 18 years of age and over, who called the quitline between August 2001 and December 2005 and who completed the evaluation and provided data on their ethnic status (n = 7082).
Demographic characteristics and tobacco behaviours of participants at intake and follow-up; reasons for calling; actions taken toward quitting, and 6-month follow-up quit rates.
7% of evaluation participants in the time period reported aboriginal origins. Aboriginal participants were younger than non-aboriginals but had similar smoking status and level of addiction at intake. Concern about future health and current health problems were the most common reasons aboriginal participants called. Six months after intake aboriginals and non-aboriginals had taken similar actions with 57% making a 24-hour quit attempt. Quit rates were higher for aboriginals than non-aboriginals, particularly for men. The 6-month prolonged abstinence rate for aboriginal men was 16.7% compared with 7.2% for aboriginal women and 9.4% and 8.3% for non-aboriginal men and women, respectively.
This exploratory analysis showed that even without targeted promotion, aboriginal smokers do call Canadian quitlines, primarily for health related reasons. We also showed that the quitlines are effective at helping them to quit. As a population focused intervention, quitlines can reach a large proportion of smokers in a cost efficient manner. In aboriginal communities where smoking rates exceed 50% and multiple health risks and chronic diseases already exist, eliminating non-ceremonial tobacco use must be a priority. Our results, although exploratory, suggest quitlines can be an effective addition to aboriginal tobacco cessation strategies.
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2002 Oct 3;347(14):1087-9312362011
Cites: Nicotine Tob Res. 2003 Feb;5(1):13-2512745503
Cites: Br J Addict. 1991 Sep;86(9):1119-271932883
Cites: Tob Control. 2007 Dec;16 Suppl 1:i3-818048627
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1999 Sep;89(9):1322-710474547
Cites: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 2005 Nov 11;54(44):1121-416280969
Cites: Tob Control. 2007 Dec;16 Suppl 1:i16-2018048624
Cites: Health Rep. 1992;4(1):7-241391655
PubMed ID
18048634 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abortion induced with methotrexate and misoprostol: a comparison of various protocols.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature209155
Source
Contraception. 1997 Mar;55(3):159-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1997
Author
E R Wiebe
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Practice, University of British Colubmia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Contraception. 1997 Mar;55(3):159-63
Date
Mar-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortifacient Agents, Nonsteroidal - administration & dosage
Abortion, Induced - methods - statistics & numerical data
Administration, Intravaginal
Administration, Oral
Adult
Canada
Cohort Studies
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Double-Blind Method
Female
Humans
Injections, Intramuscular
Methotrexate - administration & dosage
Misoprostol - administration & dosage
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Time Factors
Urban Population
Abstract
Seven hundred fifty-six women had abortions induced with methotrexate and misoprostol. Various protocols were compared. In Group 1, phase 1, after receiving 50 mg/m2 methotrexate IM, 289 women were randomized to receive either 750 or 500 micrograms of vaginal misoprostol. In Group 1, phase 2, 84 women who had failed to abort after one dose of misoprostol were randomized to receive either vaginal or oral routes for the second dose of misoprostol given on Day 8. In Group 2, a cohort of 226 women who received 60 mg/m2 methotrexate were compared to the 289 women who received 50 mg/m2 in Group 1. There were no differences in rates of effectiveness in the various trial groups. Side effects were greater with 60 mg/m2 of methotrexate. In Group 3, a cohort of 241 women received the misoprostol in three vaginal doses 8 hr apart starting on Day 5, and were compared to the 289 women in Group 1 receiving one vaginal dose. In women whose medical abortion failed, fetuses were found to have limb abnormalities In the total group of 756 women, 88.8% aborted successfully without surgical aspiration, with only minor side effects, and the acceptance rate was high. This study indicates that medical abortions induced with methotrexate and misoprostol are safe and effective, but more research is needed to find a more effective protocol.
PubMed ID
9115004 View in PubMed
Less detail

Above all, do no harm: assessing the risk of an adverse reaction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194729
Source
West J Med. 2001 May;174(5):325-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2001
Author
K. Turcotte
P. Raina
V A Moyer
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology University of British Columbia, 4480 Oak St, L-408 Vancouver, BC, Canada V6H 1V4.
Source
West J Med. 2001 May;174(5):325-9
Date
May-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Case-Control Studies
Causality
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis Vaccine - adverse effects
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Physician-Patient Relations
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Reproducibility of Results
Research Design
Risk assessment
Sensitivity and specificity
Vaccination - adverse effects
Notes
Cites: J Pediatr. 1983 Jan;102(1):14-86848712
Cites: JAMA. 1990 Mar 23-30;263(12):1641-52308203
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Jul 15;136(2):121-351415136
Cites: Lancet. 1998 Jan 31;351(9099):356-619652634
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1996 Feb 8;334(6):341-88538704
Cites: Dev Biol Stand. 1997;89:109-129272340
Cites: Vaccine. 1998 Jan-Feb;16(2-3):225-319607034
Cites: JAMA. 1994 Jan 5;271(1):37-417903109
PubMed ID
11342510 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abused women's vulnerability in daily life and in contact with psychiatric care: In the light of a caring science perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286928
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2017 Aug;26(15-16):2384-2391
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Karin Örmon
Ulrica Hörberg
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2017 Aug;26(15-16):2384-2391
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult Survivors of Child Abuse - psychology
Battered Women - psychology
Behavioral Sciences
Clinical Studies as Topic
Female
Humans
Mental Disorders - nursing - psychology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Sweden
Vulnerable Populations - psychology
Women's health
Abstract
The aim of the study is to deepen the understanding of abused women's vulnerability in relation to how the abuse and encounters with health care professionals affect life. A further aim is to highlight abused women's vulnerability with a caring science perspective.
Experience of abuse has consequences for the mental health of women and girls. Abused women may experience health care as unsupportive, and as a result, often chose not to disclose their experiences of abuse.
The results of two qualitative empirical studies were analysed along with a phenomenological meaning analysis in accordance with the methodological principles of Reflective Lifeworld Research.
Living one's life with experiences of abuse implies vulnerability, which can prevent abused women from achieving good health. This vulnerability results from insecurity regarding identity, along with the sense that one could have been a different individual if it were not for the abuse and thereby have a more fair chance in life. Being cared for within general psychiatric care could further increase this vulnerability. The healthcare professional's ability to care for the women who have experienced abuse leads to either an encounter of trust or else further suffering for the women.
A lifeworld-oriented caring science perspective as a foundation for care can contribute to care for abused women which reaches the existential dimensions of their vulnerability and vulnerable life situation.
It is evident that healthcare professionals should deepen their understanding of how abused women live, within a general psychiatric context. This study enables a deeper understanding of abused women's vulnerability in relation to how the abuse and encounters with healthcare professionals affect life.
PubMed ID
27349375 View in PubMed
Less detail

The acceptability of a depression screening tool in an urban, Aboriginal community-controlled health service.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162060
Source
Aust N Z J Public Health. 2007 Jun;31(3):259-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
Danielle M Esler
Fay Johnston
David Thomas
Author Affiliation
Danila Dilba Health Service, Northern Territory General Practice Education and Flinders University, South Australia. danielleelser@hotmail.com
Source
Aust N Z J Public Health. 2007 Jun;31(3):259-63
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Services
Depression - diagnosis
Focus Groups
Humans
Oceanic ancestry group - psychology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Urban Population
Abstract
To assess the acceptability and face validity of a psychological assessment instrument, the Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9), as a depression screening tool for use with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients.
Four focus groups were held in an urban, Aboriginal community-controlled health service. Participants' attitudes to screening for depression and the specific components of PHQ-9 were explored.
Process-oriented and PHQ-9-specific themes were raised. They included the role of family in the screening process, the need for a trusting relationship between the tool administrator and patient, the risk of confounding by social disadvantage or physical co-morbidities, the absence of a question assessing the presence of anger as a symptom of depression, and the importance of culturally appropriate language within the tool.
Modification of the screening process and wording of the PHQ-9 in response to these concerns should render it acceptable for use with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander patients in this setting.
These results may apply to the use of other psychological screening tools in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population. This is particularly relevant given the policy emphasis on screening in Indigenous health.
PubMed ID
17679245 View in PubMed
Less detail

1693 records – page 1 of 170.