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1677 records – page 1 of 168.

Patients' perceptions of barriers for participation in nursing care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137851
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2011 Sep;25(3):575-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Inga E Larsson
Monika J M Sahlsten
Kerstin Segesten
Kaety A E Plos
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden. inga-larsson@tele2.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2011 Sep;25(3):575-82
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Nursing Care
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Patients - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
In many Western countries as in Sweden, patients have legal right to participate in own care individually adjusted to each patient's wishes and abilities. There are still few empirical studies of patients' perceptions of barriers for participation. Accordingly, there is a need to identify what may prevent patients from playing an active role in own nursing care. Such knowledge is highly valuable for the nursing profession when it comes to implementation of individual patient participation.
To explore barriers for patient participation in nursing care with a special focus on adult patients with experience of inpatient physical care.
Data were collected through 6 focus groups with 26 Swedish informants recruited from physical inpatient care as well as discharged patients from such a setting. A content analysis with qualitative approach of the tape-recorded interview material was made.
The ethics of scientific work was adhered to. Each study participant gave informed consent after verbal and written information. The Ethics Committee of Göteborg University approved the study.
The barriers for patient participation were identified as four categories: Facing own inability, meeting lack of empathy, meeting a paternalistic attitude and sensing structural barriers, and their 10 underlying subcategories.
Our study contributes knowledge and understanding of patients' experiences of barriers for participation. The findings point to remaining structures and nurse attitudes that are of disadvantage for patients' participation. The findings may increase the understanding of patient participation and may serve as an incentive in practice and nursing education to meet and eliminate these barriers, in quality assurance of care, work organization and further research.
PubMed ID
21241347 View in PubMed
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[Acceptance and effects of fluoride gel treatment among school-children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40974
Source
Tandlaegebladet. 1980 Aug;84(13):427-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1980

[The extended self-care concept. Use of practitioners of alternative medicine and layman control of health services regarded as self-care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229432
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Mar 20;110(8):964-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-1990
Author
V M Christie
Author Affiliation
Norsk institutt for by- og regionforskning, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1990 Mar 20;110(8):964-6
Date
Mar-20-1990
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude
Complementary Therapies - utilization
Humans
Norway
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Self Care - methods
Abstract
Research and discussions on self-care have been concentrated mainly on what happens before the patient decides to see a doctor. Attention could just as well be given to the forms of self-care used while the patient is under medical treatment, and perhaps even more to what self-care is used after the treatment has ended. Data from the Health Survey of 1985 indicate that patients who have seen a practitioner who practises alternative medicine are more likely to use a suitable form of self-care afterwards. This is supported by an interview survey of 150 patients who had visited such practitioners. The patients' attempts to influence the health system have to be regarded as a form of self-care. Many patients' organizations also function as centers which provide information about the quality of the practitioners. The extended health concept gives more authority to health personnel, the extended self-care concept gives more authority to the patients.
PubMed ID
2321227 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Practitioner. 1990 Jul 16;234(1492):703-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-16-1990
Author
R. Ramaiah
Author Affiliation
South Tees Health Authority, Middlesbrough.
Source
Practitioner. 1990 Jul 16;234(1492):703-4
Date
Jul-16-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Nursing - organization & administration
Humans
Immunization
Infant
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Saskatchewan
PubMed ID
2217068 View in PubMed
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[Compulsory or voluntary health care?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249675
Source
Lakartidningen. 1977 Aug 17;74(33):2731-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-17-1977
Author
L. Palmgren
Source
Lakartidningen. 1977 Aug 17;74(33):2731-2
Date
Aug-17-1977
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Social Control, Formal
Substance-Related Disorders - therapy
Sweden
PubMed ID
895283 View in PubMed
Less detail

Community resilience or unidentified health risk?: health professional perceptions on the impact of the Swissair Flight 111 disaster on surrounding communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178098
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 2003;22(1):69-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Terry L Mitchell
Randy D Townsend
Jane Schnare
Author Affiliation
Dalhousie and Wilfrid Laurier Universities.
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 2003;22(1):69-84
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Aviation
Disasters
Humans
Mental health
Nova Scotia
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Abstract
On September 2nd, 1998 Swissair Flight 111 crashed in Saint Margaret's Bay, Nova Scotia. Surrounding coastal communities were immediately transformed into disaster response sites. Sixteen community health professionals were interviewed that identified several types of individual and community exposure, including exposure to human remains. The interviews revealed that the coastal communities have responded with silence and stoicism. This silence has been viewed by some health professionals as resilience. The interface of a major disaster, community silence, low help-seeking behaviours, and limited disaster health responses raises the critical question whether this is a profile of resilience or a community silently enduring.
PubMed ID
15462581 View in PubMed
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A sequential model for the structure of health care utilization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285655
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(5):e0176657
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Wolfram J Herrmann
Alexander Haarmann
Anders Bærheim
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(5):e0176657
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Germany
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Norway
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Qualitative Research
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
Traditional measurement models of health care utilization are not able to represent the complex structure of health care utilization. In this qualitative study, we, therefore, developed a new model to represent the health care utilization structure. In Norway and Germany, we conducted episodic interviews, participant observation and a concurrent context analysis. Data was analyzed by thematic coding in the framework of grounded theory. Consultations do very often not only have one single reason for encounter. They are usually not independent events but form part of consultation sequences. We could find structural differences between Norway and Germany regarding the flow of information between consultations and which providers are involved in health care in what way. This leads to a sequential model, in which health care utilization is seen as sequences of consultations. Such health care utilization sequences consist of nodes which are connected by edges. Nodes represent patient-provider contacts and edges depict the flow of information. Time and the level of health care providers are dimensions in the model. These sequences can be described by different measures and aggregated on population level. Thus, the sequential model can be further used in analyzing health care utilization quantitatively, e.g., by using routine data.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28498872 View in PubMed
Less detail

Involve the elderly in program design.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249867
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1977 Jun;54(6):39-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1977
Author
W A Palmer
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1977 Jun;54(6):39-41
Date
Jun-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Nursing Homes
Orientation
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
PubMed ID
873084 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 1997;18(2):93-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
A. Gentile
Author Affiliation
Early Detection and Treatment Division, Cancer Bureau, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Chronic Dis Can. 1997;18(2):93-4
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Complementary Therapies - utilization
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Neoplasms - therapy
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Questionnaires
PubMed ID
9268288 View in PubMed
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1677 records – page 1 of 168.