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366 records – page 1 of 37.

Source
Dan Medicinhist Arbog. 2015;43:101-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Sven Erik Hansen
Source
Dan Medicinhist Arbog. 2015;43:101-8
Date
2015
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Fatal Outcome
Female
Fetal Death - etiology
History, 19th Century
Humans
Medical Illustration - history
Obstetrics - history
Osteomyelitis - complications - history - pathology
Parturition
Periodicals as Topic
Pregnancy
Abstract
A birth with fatal outcome for both the mother and the foetus was reported in the Danish medical journal, Bibliothek for Læger in 1868. Here, the article with its two illustrations is summarised because of the vivid description of the course together with the therapeutic considerations expressed by the obstetrician. Due to an earlier osteomyelitis the pregnant woman's spine was deformed and her pelvis was narrowed. The birth came to a standstill, and it became necessary to reduce the circumference of the foetus' cranium by perforation, after which the dead foetus could be delivered. The woman died of infection some days later. Afterwards her deformed lumbar spine and pelvis was removed, preserved and depicted in two lithographs. The preserved pelvis is still extant in the Saxtorphian obstetric collection in Medical Museion, Copenhagen.
PubMed ID
27086448 View in PubMed
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Able to choose? Women's thoughts and experiences regarding informed choices during birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310264
Source
Midwifery. 2019 Oct; 77:123-129
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2019
Author
Hilde Bringedal
Ingvild Aune
Author Affiliation
Women and Children Center, St.Olavs Hospital, Olav Kyrres gate 11, 7006 Trondheim, Norway. Electronic address: hilde.bringedal@stolav.no.
Source
Midwifery. 2019 Oct; 77:123-129
Date
Oct-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Choice Behavior
Decision Making, Shared
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic - methods
Norway
Parturition - psychology
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women - psychology
Qualitative Research
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
To gain a deeper understanding of women's thoughts and experiences regarding informed choices during childbirth.
A qualitative approach with individual in-depth interviews was chosen for data collection. Ten women were interviewed three to four weeks after the birth of their first child. The transcribed interviews were analysed using systematic text condensation.
Two main themes emerged based on the analysis: "women's resources and coping abilities" and "women's abilities to make informed choices during birth". Women's resources and coping abilities influenced how they retrieved information and made their own choices. Their abilities to make informed choices during birth were influenced by the course of the birth process and the fact that they were patients and submitted to the hospitals' routines.
Instead of using the term "informed choice", women in this study discussed involvement, participation and being heard and seen as individuals. How receptive women are to information during birth varies, and midwives play an important role during pregnancy in informing and encouraging them. The relationship between women and midwives influences women's abilities to make informed choices during birth. Women need individual care and should be encouraged to have realistic expectations and to gain knowledge and confidence in their ability to give birth. A model of care in which women experience greater continuity will have an impact on their expectations, decision-making and experience of birth.
PubMed ID
31323487 View in PubMed
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Acute otitis media and season of birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29840
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2005 Apr;69(4):487-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Preben Homøe
Rene B Christensen
Poul Bretlau
Author Affiliation
Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Rigshospitalet, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, Copenhagen DK-2100 Ø, Denmark. phom@rh.dk
Source
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2005 Apr;69(4):487-91
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Child
Child, Preschool
Greenland
Health Surveys
Humans
Otitis Media - etiology
Parturition
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Seasons
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: This study examines the question whether season of birth is associated with acute otitis media (AOM) and recurrent AOM (rAOM) and whether season of birth is associated with early age of AOM onset. METHODS: This was done in a population-based survey of 591 unselected Greenlandic children aged 3-5 and 8 years, living in the two largest towns in Greenland. The overall attendance rate was 86%. Information of AOM episodes was obtained from the parents and cross-checked in medical records available for 95% of the children. In total, 67% reported AOM at least once and 30% of those had rAOM. RESULTS: According to season of birth, the frequency of history of AOM in general varied between 63% and 70% lowest for birth in the autumn and highest for birth in the spring but without any significant statistical difference (p=0.51). The similar variation in rAOM according to season of birth was between 21% and 35%, highest for children born in autumn and winter and lowest for children born in the spring (p=0.09). Additionally, there was no difference in age at onset of the first AOM episode according to season of birth. However, AOM children born in the summer and autumn periods have a significantly higher relative risk (RR=1.44, CI=1.04-1.99) of attracting rAOM than AOM children born in the winter and spring periods. This may be due to a higher risk of being quickly reinfected in the late autumn and winter period with another episode of upper respiratory tract infection. CONCLUSION: Season of birth do not seem to be a predictor of AOM episodes or early onset of AOM but children born in the summer and autumn periods who attracts AOM have a higher risk of developing rAOM.
PubMed ID
15763285 View in PubMed
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Ada Parsons: "Giving birth should be a special time": Narrative 9 of the Marathon maternity oral history project. Interview date: August 22, 2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256849
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2014 Jan;60(1):e81-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014

Adaption of pregnancy anxiety questionnaire-revised for all pregnant women regardless of parity: PRAQ-R2.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279025
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2016 Feb;19(1):125-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
A C Huizink
M J Delforterie
N M Scheinin
M. Tolvanen
L. Karlsson
H. Karlsson
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2016 Feb;19(1):125-32
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety - diagnosis - psychology
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Delivery, Obstetric - methods
Female
Finland
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Parity
Parturition
Predictive value of tests
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women - psychology
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Reproducibility of Results
Surveys and Questionnaires - standards
Abstract
The 10-item Pregnancy-Related Anxiety Questionnaire-Revised (PRAQ-R) is a widely used instrument to assess and identify pregnancy-specific anxiety in nulliparous women. It has good psychometric values and predictive validity for birth and childhood outcomes. Nonetheless, the PRAQ-R is not designed for use in parous women, as particularly one item of the questionnaire is not relevant for women who gave birth before. We tested the factorial and scalar invariance of a modified PRAQ-R2 across nulliparous and parous women with an adapted item to fit both groups of pregnant women. A longitudinal study among 1144 pregnant women (n = 608 nulliparous and n = 536 parous) with two repeated measures of the PRAQ-R2 was used to test for measurement invariance of the instrument. Results show metric and scalar invariance, indicating that the PRAQ-R2 measures similar constructs on the same scale for all pregnant women at two different times during pregnancy. We conclude that the PRAQ-R2 can be used, compared, or combined in a sample of nulliparous and parous women.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25971851 View in PubMed
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Age at first childbirth and breast cancer survival: a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307416
Source
BMC Res Notes. 2020 Jan 06; 13(1):9
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-06-2020
Author
Johanna Aurin
Henrik Thorlacius
Salma Tunå Butt
Author Affiliation
Institution of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Department of Surgery, Skåne University Hospital Malmo, Lund University, 205 02, Malmö, Sweden. johannaeaurin@gmail.com.
Source
BMC Res Notes. 2020 Jan 06; 13(1):9
Date
Jan-06-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Parturition
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Late age at first childbirth is a well-established risk factor for breast cancer. Previous studies have, however, shown conflicting results to whether late age at first childbirth also influences the prognosis of breast cancer survival. The aim of this study was to examine age at first birth in relation to survival after breast cancer diagnosis.
We used information from the Malmö Diet and Cancer study. At baseline 17,035 women were included. All women were followed from the year they developed breast cancer until they either died or until the end of follow-up. All women were asked how many children they had given birth to and were then divided into different groups, =?20, >?20 to ?=?25, >?25 to ?=?30 and >?30. Nulliparous women form a separate group. Survival analyses were then performed using Cox proportional hazard survival analysis. Women in all age groups had a lower risk of breast cancer specific death as compared to the reference group?=?20, however non-significantly. Nulliparous women had a higher risk of breast cancer specific death as compared to the same reference group, however these results were not statistically significant. We could not see any negative effect of late first childbirth on breast cancer specific survival.
PubMed ID
31907014 View in PubMed
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Age at onset of multiple sclerosis is correlated to use of combined oral contraceptives and childbirth before diagnosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100449
Source
Fertil Steril. 2010 Dec;94(7):2835-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Per Holmqvist
Mats Hammar
Anne-Marie Landtblom
Jan Brynhildsen
Author Affiliation
Division of Womens and Childrens Health, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. per.holmqvist@lvn.se
Source
Fertil Steril. 2010 Dec;94(7):2835-7
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Age of Onset
Contraceptives, Oral, Combined - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Multiple Sclerosis - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Parturition - physiology
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate whether age of onset of multiple sclerosis is related to use of combined oral contraceptives and/or timing of childbirth. The results showed that use of combined oral contraceptives and childbirth before the first multiple sclerosis symptom was correlated to a higher mean age at the onset of the disease.
Notes
RefSource: Fertil Steril. 2011 Jan;95(1):e3; author reply e4
PubMed ID
20807659 View in PubMed
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Alexithymia, body mass index and gestational diabetes in pregnant women - FinnBrain birth cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309298
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2019 09; 124:109742
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-2019
Author
Jani Kajanoja
Max Karukivi
Noora M Scheinin
Jetro J Tuulari
Hanna Ahrnberg
Linnea Karlsson
Hasse Karlsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland; FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study, University of Turku, Finland. Electronic address: jani.kajanoja@utu.fi.
Source
J Psychosom Res. 2019 09; 124:109742
Date
09-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Affective Symptoms - complications - epidemiology
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Diabetes, Gestational - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Parturition
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Prevalence
Abstract
Overweight, obesity, and associated problems in metabolic health are an increasing public health concern. Personality traits and emotional processing styles may play a role in the regulation of food intake and reward. Alexithymia is a personality construct involving difficulties in identifying and expressing emotions and has been previously associated with eating disorders and metabolic problems. We examined associations between alexithymia dimensions, Body Mass Index (BMI) and gestational diabetes in pregnant women.
The participants were 1660 pregnant women living in Finland from the FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study. We investigated the associations between alexithymia and its dimensions as measured by the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), overweight, and gestational diabetes. The effects of age, education, and depressive symptoms were controlled for using hierarchical regression analysis.
Alexithymic individuals had a higher prevalence of overweight compared to those with low or moderate levels of alexithymia (66.0% vs. 34.8%, OR 3.6, adjusted OR 3.6, CI95% 1.9-6.8, p?
PubMed ID
31443801 View in PubMed
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An evolutionary genomic approach to identify genes involved in human birth timing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134886
Source
PLoS Genet. 2011 Apr;7(4):e1001365
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Jevon Plunkett
Scott Doniger
Guilherme Orabona
Thomas Morgan
Ritva Haataja
Mikko Hallman
Hilkka Puttonen
Ramkumar Menon
Edward Kuczynski
Errol Norwitz
Victoria Snegovskikh
Aarno Palotie
Leena Peltonen
Vineta Fellman
Emily A DeFranco
Bimal P Chaudhari
Tracy L McGregor
Jude J McElroy
Matthew T Oetjens
Kari Teramo
Ingrid Borecki
Justin Fay
Louis Muglia
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America.
Source
PLoS Genet. 2011 Apr;7(4):e1001365
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
African Americans - genetics
Animals
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Evolution, Molecular
Female
Finland
Gene Frequency
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genotype
Humans
Linkage Disequilibrium
Models, Genetic
Parturition - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Premature Birth - genetics
Receptors, FSH - genetics
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Coordination of fetal maturation with birth timing is essential for mammalian reproduction. In humans, preterm birth is a disorder of profound global health significance. The signals initiating parturition in humans have remained elusive, due to divergence in physiological mechanisms between humans and model organisms typically studied. Because of relatively large human head size and narrow birth canal cross-sectional area compared to other primates, we hypothesized that genes involved in parturition would display accelerated evolution along the human and/or higher primate phylogenetic lineages to decrease the length of gestation and promote delivery of a smaller fetus that transits the birth canal more readily. Further, we tested whether current variation in such accelerated genes contributes to preterm birth risk. Evidence from allometric scaling of gestational age suggests human gestation has been shortened relative to other primates. Consistent with our hypothesis, many genes involved in reproduction show human acceleration in their coding or adjacent noncoding regions. We screened >8,400 SNPs in 150 human accelerated genes in 165 Finnish preterm and 163 control mothers for association with preterm birth. In this cohort, the most significant association was in FSHR, and 8 of the 10 most significant SNPs were in this gene. Further evidence for association of a linkage disequilibrium block of SNPs in FSHR, rs11686474, rs11680730, rs12473870, and rs1247381 was found in African Americans. By considering human acceleration, we identified a novel gene that may be associated with preterm birth, FSHR. We anticipate other human accelerated genes will similarly be associated with preterm birth risk and elucidate essential pathways for human parturition.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21533219 View in PubMed
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366 records – page 1 of 37.