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Association between incidence risk of milk fever and lactation number, breed and season.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64878
Source
Acta Vet Scand Suppl. 1993;89:141-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
E. Kusumanti
J F Agger
K. Jensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Animal Science and Animal Health, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg C, Denmark.
Source
Acta Vet Scand Suppl. 1993;89:141-2
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Breeding
Cattle
Cattle Diseases - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Incidence
Parity
Parturient Paresis - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Random Allocation
Risk factors
Seasons
PubMed ID
8237653 View in PubMed
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Displacement of the abomasum in the cow. Incidence, etiological factors and results of treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65954
Source
Nord Vet Med. 1979 Mar;31(3):106-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1979
Author
S A Varden
Source
Nord Vet Med. 1979 Mar;31(3):106-13
Date
Mar-1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abomasum
Age Factors
Animal Feed
Animals
Cattle
Cattle Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - surgery
Exertion
Female
Ketosis - epidemiology - veterinary
Norway
Parturient Paresis - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Seasons
Abstract
Fiftynine cases of abomasal displacement were registered during a 10 year period in a veterinary district in Norway with a dairy cow population of approx. 2500. Of these, 88% were left displacements and 12% right displacements. Ten per cent recovered spontaneously without subsequent relapse. Corrective surgery was performed on the remainder, and 92% of these recovered completely. Surgery was, in most cases, performed on the same day as the diagnosis of abomasal displacement was made. The displacements occurred at all times of the year: 86% of cases involved cows in third or subsequent lactation 95% were diagnosed within the period 4--64 days after calving, and 70% of the cows had been treated for other illness with disturbance of digestion during the week immediately prior to the demonstration of the displacement. In a further 25%, ketosis was diagnosed at the same time as the displacement. Etiology and pathogenesis are discussed.
PubMed ID
254885 View in PubMed
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Incidence of milk fever and ketosis in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64879
Source
Acta Vet Scand Suppl. 1993;89:139-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
S. Waage
Author Affiliation
National Veterinary Institute, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Acta Vet Scand Suppl. 1993;89:139-40
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cattle
Cattle Diseases - epidemiology
Dairying
Female
Incidence
Ketosis - epidemiology - veterinary
Norway - epidemiology
Parturient Paresis - epidemiology
Pregnancy
PubMed ID
8237652 View in PubMed
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Mastitis, ketosis, and milk fever in 31 organic and 93 conventional Norwegian dairy herds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63740
Source
J Dairy Sci. 2001 Dec;84(12):2673-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
F. Hardeng
V L Edge
Author Affiliation
Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo. froydis.hardeng@veths.no
Source
J Dairy Sci. 2001 Dec;84(12):2673-9
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Husbandry - methods
Animals
Cattle - physiology
Cattle Diseases - epidemiology
Cell Count
Female
Incidence
Ketosis - epidemiology - veterinary
Lactation
Mastitis, Bovine - epidemiology
Milk - cytology - secretion
Norway
Odds Ratio
Parturient Paresis - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Seasons
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate differences in disease incidence between organic and conventional herds. The study was based on data from the Norwegian Dairy Herd Recording, which includes the Norwegian Cattle Health Recording System. All herds certified for organic farming in 1994 with a herd size of more than five cow-years were included. Conventional herds were matched on size and region, and from these, three herds were randomly selected for each organic herd. This resulted in a study group of 31 organic and 93 conventional herds with data from 1994 through 1997. The study unit was the cow within a lactation. Factors influencing disease incidence were studied by means of a generalized linear model approach. Management system had a highly significant effect on disease incidence. Odds ratios for organic compared with conventional herds were as follows: mastitis, 0.38; ketosis, 0.33; and milk fever, 0.60. Other significant factors that emerged in modeling the three diseases were year and lactation category for mastitis; lactation category, maximum milk yield, and season for ketosis; and lactation category and milk yield for milk fever. There was no marked difference in milk somatic cell count (SCC) between organic and conventional herds. However, cows in organic herds had lower SCC in lactation two and greater counts in lactations six and higher.
PubMed ID
11814023 View in PubMed
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