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Airborne biogenic particles in the snow of the cities of the Russian Far East as potential allergic compounds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262711
Source
J Immunol Res. 2014;2014:141378
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Kirill S Golokhvast
Source
J Immunol Res. 2014;2014:141378
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Allergens - adverse effects - analysis
Animals
Cities
Environmental monitoring
Far East
Humans
Particulate Matter - adverse effects - analysis
Risk factors
Russia
Snow
Abstract
This paper presents an analysis of airborne biogenic particles (1 mkm-1 mm) found in the snow in several cities of the Russian Far East during 2010-2013. The most common was vegetational terraneous detritus (fragments of tree and grass leaves) followed by animal hair, small insects and their fragments, microorganisms of aeroplankton, and equivocal biological garbage. Specific components were found in samples from locations close to bodies of water such as fragments of algae and mollusc shells and, marine invertebrates (needles of sea urchins and shell debris of arthropods). In most locations across the Far East (Vladivostok, Khabarovsk, Blagoveshchensk, and Ussuriysk), the content of biogenic particles collected in the winter did not exceed 10% of the total particulate matter, with the exception of Birobidzhan and the nature reserve Bastak, where it made up to 20%. Most of all biogenic compounds should be allergic: hair, fragments of tree and grass leaves, insects, and microorganisms.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25140327 View in PubMed
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Airborne particulate matter from primarily geologic, non-industrial sources at levels below National Ambient Air Quality Standards is associated with outpatient visits for asthma and quick-relief medication prescriptions among children less than 20 years old enrolled in Medicaid in Anchorage, Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80178
Source
Environ Res. 2007 Mar;103(3):397-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Chimonas Marc-Andre R
Gessner Bradford D
Author Affiliation
Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA. mchimonas@msn.com
Source
Environ Res. 2007 Mar;103(3):397-404
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alaska - epidemiology
Ambulatory Care - statistics & numerical data
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - drug therapy - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Medicaid
Models, Statistical
Particle Size
Particulate Matter - adverse effects - analysis - standards
Abstract
In Anchorage, Alaska, particulates with aerodynamic diameter or = 34 micro g/m(3). A significant 18.1% increase (RR: 1.181, 95% CI: 1.010-1.381) in the rate of quick-relief medication prescriptions occurred during days with PM(10) of 34-60 micro g/m(3), and a 28.8% increase (RR: 1.288, 95% CI: 1.026-1.619) occurred during days with PM(10) > or = 61 micro g/m(3). Similar results for outpatient asthma visits and quick-relief medication occurred in weekly models. There were no significant associations with PM(2.5) in either daily or weekly models. These subtle but statistically significant associations suggest that non-industrial, geologic sources of PM(10) may have measurable health effects at levels below current national standards.
PubMed ID
17049511 View in PubMed
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Ambient air pollution and daily emergency department visits for headache in Ottawa, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159167
Source
Headache. 2008 Jul;48(7):1076-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2008
Author
Mieczyslaw Szyszkowicz
Author Affiliation
Air Health Effects Division, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
Source
Headache. 2008 Jul;48(7):1076-81
Date
Jul-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Emergency Service, Hospital - trends
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Headache - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Particulate Matter - adverse effects
Seasons
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
No extensive studies exist on the relation between ambient air pollution and health outcomes such as migraine or headache. From other side, existing publications indicated that air pollutants can trigger migraine or headache.
To examine associations between emergency department (ED) visits for headache and environmental conditions: ambient air pollution concentrations adjusted for weather factors (atmospheric pressure, temperature, and relative humidity).
This is a time-series study of 8012 ED visits for headache (International Classification for Diseases ninth revision: 784) recorded at an Ottawa hospital between 1992 and 2000. The generalized linear mixed models technique is used to model relation between daily counts of ED visits for headache and ambient air pollutants (gases: sulphur dioxide [SO(2)], nitrogen dioxide [NO(2)], carbon monoxide [CO]). The counts of visits for all patients, male and female patients, are analyzed separately.
The percentage increase in daily ED visits for headache was 4.2% (95% CI: 0.2, 6.4) and 4.9% (95% CI: 1.2, 8.8) for 1-day and 2-day lagged exposure to SO(2) for an increase in the interquartile range (IQR, IQR = 3.9 ppb). The positive statistically significant associations were also observed for exposure to NO(2) and CO for all and male ED visits for headache.
Presented findings provide support for the hypothesis that ED visits for headache are related to ambient air pollution.
PubMed ID
18218009 View in PubMed
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Ambient air pollution and primary liver cancer incidence in four European cohorts within the ESCAPE project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282438
Source
Environ Res. 2017 Apr;154:226-233
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Marie Pedersen
Zorana J Andersen
Massimo Stafoggia
Gudrun Weinmayr
Claudia Galassi
Mette Sørensen
Kirsten T Eriksen
Anne Tjønneland
Steffen Loft
Andrea Jaensch
Gabriele Nagel
Hans Concin
Ming-Yi Tsai
Sara Grioni
Alessandro Marcon
Vittorio Krogh
Fulvio Ricceri
Carlotta Sacerdote
Andrea Ranzi
Ranjeet Sokhi
Roel Vermeulen
Kees de Hoogh
Meng Wang
Rob Beelen
Paolo Vineis
Bert Brunekreef
Gerard Hoek
Ole Raaschou-Nielsen
Source
Environ Res. 2017 Apr;154:226-233
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Austria - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Incidence
Italy - epidemiology
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Nitrogen Oxides - adverse effects - analysis
Particulate Matter - adverse effects - analysis
Vehicle Emissions - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
Tobacco smoke exposure increases the risk of cancer in the liver, but little is known about the possible risk associated with exposure to ambient air pollution.
We evaluated the association between residential exposure to air pollution and primary liver cancer incidence.
We obtained data from four cohorts with enrolment during 1985-2005 in Denmark, Austria and Italy. Exposure to nitrogen oxides (NO2 and NOX), particulate matter (PM) with diameter of less than 10µm (PM10), less than 2.5µm (PM2.5), between 2.5 and 10µm (PM2.5-10) and PM2.5 absorbance (soot) at baseline home addresses were estimated using land-use regression models from the ESCAPE project. We also investigated traffic density on the nearest road. We used Cox proportional-hazards models with adjustment for potential confounders for cohort-specific analyses and random-effects meta-analyses to estimate summary hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).
Out of 174,770 included participants, 279 liver cancer cases were diagnosed during a mean follow-up of 17 years. In each cohort, HRs above one were observed for all exposures with exception of PM2.5 absorbance and traffic density. In the meta-analysis, all exposures were associated with elevated HRs, but none of the associations reached statistical significance. The summary HR associated with a 10-µg/m(3) increase in NO2 was 1.10 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.93, 1.30) and 1.34 (95% CI: 0.76, 2.35) for a 5-µg/m(3) increase in PM2.5.
The results provide suggestive evidence that ambient air pollution may increase the risk of liver cancer. Confidence intervals for associations with NO2 and NOX were narrower than for the other exposures.
PubMed ID
28107740 View in PubMed
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[Assessment of Moscow population health risk from exposure to ambient air suspended matter].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145593
Source
Gig Sanit. 2009 Nov-Dec;(6):41-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
S M Novikov
A V Ivanenko
I F Volkova
A P Kornienko
N S Skvortsova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2009 Nov-Dec;(6):41-3
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Environmental health
Humans
Hygiene - standards
Moscow
Particulate Matter - adverse effects
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Abstract
Ambient air pollution by suspended matter is an environmental factor that has the greatest influence on the health status of the majority of the Russian Federation's population. There is extensive epidemiological and clinical evidence suggesting that ambient air pollution by suspended matter and its fine-dispersed fractions PM10 and PM2.5 in particular, poses a serious threat to human health. The existing Russian single and average daily maximum permissible concentrations of suspended matter are not a high risk from this type of ambient air pollution and fail to assess human health damage in full measure. To reduce the concentrations of suspended matter and their action on man is currently the worldwide priority task whose performance will save much money. There is a need to change an air pollution monitoring system (continuous monitoring of fine suspended matter of PM10 and PM2.5), as well as to substantiate and introduce Russian hygienic standards for fine suspended matter (PM10 and PM2.5).
PubMed ID
20135864 View in PubMed
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Assessment of the potential respiratory hazard of volcanic ash from future Icelandic eruptions: a study of archived basaltic to rhyolitic ash samples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287934
Source
Environ Health. 2017 Sep 11;16(1):98
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-11-2017
Author
David E Damby
Claire J Horwell
Gudrun Larsen
Thorvaldur Thordarson
Maura Tomatis
Bice Fubini
Ken Donaldson
Source
Environ Health. 2017 Sep 11;16(1):98
Date
Sep-11-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Humans
Iceland
Particle Size
Particulate Matter - adverse effects - analysis
Silicates - adverse effects - analysis
Volcanic Eruptions - adverse effects - analysis
Abstract
The eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull (2010) and Grímsvötn (2011), Iceland, triggered immediate, international consideration of the respiratory health hazard of inhaling volcanic ash, and prompted the need to estimate the potential hazard posed by future eruptions of Iceland's volcanoes to Icelandic and Northern European populations.
A physicochemical characterization and toxicological assessment was conducted on a suite of archived ash samples spanning the spectrum of past eruptions (basaltic to rhyolitic magmatic composition) of Icelandic volcanoes following a protocol specifically designed by the International Volcanic Health Hazard Network.
Icelandic ash can be of a respirable size (up to 11.3 vol.% 
Notes
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PubMed ID
28893249 View in PubMed
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Association between air pollution from residential wood burning and dementia incidence in a longitudinal study in Northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296869
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(6):e0198283
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Anna Oudin
David Segersson
Rolf Adolfsson
Bertil Forsberg
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(6):e0198283
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Dementia - chemically induced - epidemiology
Female
Fires
Housing
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Particulate Matter - adverse effects - analysis
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Vehicle Emissions - analysis
Wood - adverse effects - chemistry
Abstract
There is highly suggestive evidence for an effect of air pollution exposure on dementia-related outcomes, but evidence is not yet present to clearly pinpoint which pollutants are the probable causal agents. The aims of this study was to assess the longitudinal association between exposures of fine ambient particulate matter (PM2.5) from residential wood burning, and vehicle exhaust, with dementia.
We used data from the Betula study, a longitudinal study of dementia in Umeå, Northern Sweden. The study size was 1 806 and the participants were followed from study entry (1993-1995) to 2010. Modelled levels of source-specific fine particulate matter at the residential address were combined with information on wood stoves or wood boilers, and with validated data on dementia diagnosis and individual-level characteristics from the Betula study. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate Hazard Ratios (HRs) and their 95% CIs for dementia incidence (vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease), adjusted for individual-level characteristics.
The emission of PM2.5 from local residential wood burning was associated with dementia incidence with a hazard ratio of 1.55 for a 1 µg/m3 increase in PM2.5 (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.00-2.41, p-value 0.05). Study participants with an address in an area with the highest quartile of PM2.5 from residential wood burning and who also had a wood-burning stove were more likely to develop dementia than those in the lower three quartiles without a wood-burning stove with hazard ratios of 1.74 (CI: 1.10-2.75, p-value 0.018). Particulate matter from traffic exhaust seemed to be associated with dementia incidence with hazard ratios of 1.66, (CI: 1.16-2.39), p-value 0.006, and 1.41 (CI: 0.97-2.23), p-value 0.07, in the third and fourth quartiles, respectively.
If the associations we observed are causal, then air pollution from residential wood burning, and air pollution from traffic, might be independent important risk factors for dementia.
PubMed ID
29897947 View in PubMed
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Associations of ambient air pollution with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease hospitalization and mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116489
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2013 Apr 1;187(7):721-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2013
Author
Wen Qi Gan
J Mark FitzGerald
Chris Carlsten
Mohsen Sadatsafavi
Michael Brauer
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Health, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine, Great Neck, NY 11021, USA. wgan@nshs.edu
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2013 Apr 1;187(7):721-7
Date
Apr-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Particulate Matter - adverse effects
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - mortality
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Vehicle Emissions - toxicity
Abstract
Ambient air pollution has been suggested as a risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, there is a lack of longitudinal studies to support this assertion.
To investigate the associations of long-term exposure to elevated traffic-related air pollution and woodsmoke pollution with the risk of COPD hospitalization and mortality.
This population-based cohort study included a 5-year exposure period and a 4-year follow-up period. All residents aged 45-85 years who resided in Metropolitan Vancouver, Canada, during the exposure period and did not have known COPD at baseline were included in this study (n = 467,994). Residential exposures to traffic-related air pollutants (black carbon, particulate matter
PubMed ID
23392442 View in PubMed
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Associations of fine and ultrafine particulate air pollution with stroke mortality in an area of low air pollution levels.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165118
Source
Stroke. 2007 Mar;38(3):918-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Jaana Kettunen
Timo Lanki
Pekka Tiittanen
Pasi P Aalto
Tarja Koskentalo
Markku Kulmala
Veikko Salomaa
Juha Pekkanen
Author Affiliation
Environmental Epidemiology Unit , Kuopio, Finland. jaana.kettunen@ktl.fi
Source
Stroke. 2007 Mar;38(3):918-22
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Finland
Humans
Particle Size
Particulate Matter - adverse effects
Seasons
Stroke - etiology - mortality
Urban health
Abstract
Daily variation in outdoor concentrations of inhalable particles (PM(10)
PubMed ID
17303767 View in PubMed
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68 records – page 1 of 7.