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Burden of parkinsonism: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186373
Source
Mov Disord. 2003 Mar;18(3):313-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Mark Guttman
Pamela M Slaughter
Marc-Erick Theriault
Donald P DeBoer
C David Naylor
Author Affiliation
Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. mguttman@idirect.com
Source
Mov Disord. 2003 Mar;18(3):313-9
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Costs and Cost Analysis
Female
Health Services Research
Hospitalization - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Office Visits - economics - statistics & numerical data
Parkinson Disease - economics - epidemiology - therapy
Parkinsonian Disorders - economics - epidemiology - therapy
Prevalence
Abstract
Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with a significant burden of illness and cost to society, which has been difficult to quantify. Our objective was to use linked administrative databases from the population of Ontario, Canada, to assess the prevalence of parkinsonism, physician- and drug-related costs, and hospital utilization for parkinsonian patients compared with age/sex matched controls. An inception cohort of parkinsonian cases from 1993/1994 was age and sex matched (1:2) to controls and followed for 6 years. Patients were identified by the diagnostic code for PD, the use of specific PD drugs, or a combination. The parkinsonian case cohort (15,304) was matched to (30,608) controls that did not have parkinsonism. The age-adjusted prevalence rates were 3.63 for men and for 3.24 women per 1,000 (increased by 5.4% for men and 9.8% for women). Physician costs were 1.4 times more, there were 1.44 times more hospital admissions, admissions were on average 1.19 times longer, and drug costs were 3.0 times more for parkinsonian cases. We conclude that the substantially higher physician and drug costs as well as hospitalization rates compared with controls clearly suggest that parkinsonism is associated with large direct costs to society.
PubMed ID
12621635 View in PubMed
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Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2008 Mar;117(3):167-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
M. Sillanpää
P. Andlin-Sobocki
J. Lönnqvist
Author Affiliation
Departments of Public Health and Child Neurology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. matti.sillanpaa@utu.fi
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2008 Mar;117(3):167-72
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Brain Diseases - economics - epidemiology
Dementia - economics - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Care Costs
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Parkinson Disease - economics - epidemiology
Prevalence
Stroke - economics - epidemiology
Abstract
To calculate the costs of brain disorders on the national level.
Electronic data bases, national registers and internet data.
Any brain disorder was estimated to affect a fifth of the Finnish population. The three most common disorders were migraine, anxiety disorder and affective disorder. The total costs of brain disorders constituted 3% of the national gross product, or 45% of all the health-care costs. However, this is likely a conservative estimate, because not all chronic brain disorders and not all costs were included. Of the total costs of brain disorders, 32% were for direct health care, 23% for indirect medical care and 45% for indirect costs. Dementia was the most costly individual brain disorder followed by addiction and affective disorders. Most costly per case were brain tumours and multiple sclerosis.
Brain disorders constitute a costly part of the population's health costs. Directed preventive measures are needed to counteract the population morbidity and to control the increasing cost pressure in health care.
PubMed ID
18081913 View in PubMed
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Dependency and transfer incomes in idiopathic Parkinson's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263808
Source
Dan Med J. 2014 Oct;61(10):A4915
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2014
Author
Charlotte Starhof
Niels Anker
Tove Henriksen
Christina Funch Lassen
Source
Dan Med J. 2014 Oct;61(10):A4915
Date
Oct-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark - epidemiology
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Parkinson Disease - economics - epidemiology
Registries
Young Adult
Abstract
Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder affecting approximately 1% of the population above 65 years of age. The aim of this study was to define the estimated Danish IPD population and to elucidate source of income and labour market affiliation for working-age IPD patients.
IPD cases were included through the Danish Register of Medicinal Product Statistics. The participants had to be alive by the end of 2010 and at least twice have cashed in prescriptions on IPD medication in the 2009-2010 period. Information on employment status and transfer income was retrieved through the DREAM database under the Danish Ministry of Employment.
A total of 7,033 estimated IPD patients were identified. The mean age at time of registration (2010, week 50) was 72 years. Overall, 7% of the IPD patients were employed and 5% were self-supportive. In the working age range (18-64 years), 25% were employed and 10% enrolled in supported employment. Compared with the age-adjusted general population, twice as many IPD patients were outside the ordinary labour market and, furthermore, the proportion receiving anticipatory pension was increased threefold. The majority (89%) of the patients were living at home with a spouse (59%). 11% were nursing home residents.
The working age IPD population was more prone to be outside employment and to receive public transfer income than an age-adjusted population sample.
The study was funded by the Danish Parkinson Association.
not relevant.
PubMed ID
25283617 View in PubMed
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Distribution of multiple sclerosis in Sweden based on mortality and disability compensation statistics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189767
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2002 Jul-Aug;21(4):167-79
Publication Type
Article
Author
Anne-Marie Landtblom
Trond Riise
Alexei Boiko
Birgitta Söderfeldt
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Division of Neurology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Linköping, Sweden. Anne-Marie.Landtblom@lio.se
Source
Neuroepidemiology. 2002 Jul-Aug;21(4):167-79
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis - mortality
Female
Humans
Male
Multiple Sclerosis - economics - mortality
Parkinson Disease - economics - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Time
Workers' Compensation - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Previous studies have shown the Fennoscandian region to be a high-risk area for multiple sclerosis (MS). In order to investigate the distribution of MS in Sweden, mortality (1952-1992) and disability pensioning statistics (1971-1994) were studied. A total of 11,414 cases with a disability pension and 5,421 cases with MS on their death certificate were analysed according to county and time period and the results were compared with the mortality figures for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and disability pensioning statistics for Parkinson's disease. We found increasing rates of both MS mortality and disability pensioning. Disability pensioning correlated well with mortality 10 years later (r = 0.42, p = 0.04). We also found a marked geographical variation. Värmland county had the highest mortality, with 14 out of its 16 municipalities having higher rates than the national mean. Unexpectedly, we found a high correlation between mortality due to MS and ALS (r = 0.60, p = 0.002).
PubMed ID
12065879 View in PubMed
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[Increasing societal costs of Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease. Aging population and medical progress yield more and more expensive care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125609
Source
Lakartidningen. 2011 Nov 23-29;108(47):2422-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
Johan Lökk
Author Affiliation
Geriatriska kliniken, Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset, Huddinge. johan.lokk@karolinska.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2011 Nov 23-29;108(47):2422-3
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alzheimer Disease - economics - epidemiology - therapy
Cost of Illness
Health Care Costs
Humans
Parkinson Disease - economics - epidemiology - therapy
Sweden - epidemiology
PubMed ID
22468382 View in PubMed
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Parkinson's disease and working capacity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165983
Source
Mov Disord. 2006 Dec;21(12):2187-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Kirsti K Martikainen
Tiina H Luukkaala
Reijo J Marttila
Author Affiliation
The Finnish Parkinson Association and Foundation, Turku, Finland. kirsti.martikainen@parkinson.fi
Source
Mov Disord. 2006 Dec;21(12):2187-91
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Disability Evaluation
Employment
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Parkinson Disease - economics - epidemiology - physiopathology
Questionnaires
Retirement
Work - physiology
Abstract
The purpose of the present study was to establish how Parkinson's disease (PD) affects working capacity. Altogether, 937 (70%) of 1,343 working-aged members of the Finnish Parkinson Association participated in a questionnaire study. The ages of the subjects were between 29 and 65 years, median 59.0 years; 508 (54%) were men. The median (quartile range) duration of PD symptoms was 7.3 (4.3-11.3) years, and the median self-estimated severity of the disease on the Hoehn & Yahr scale was 2. Only 150 of 937 subjects (16%) were still working: 112 (12%) full-time and 38 (4%) part-time. Among those 343 (37%) who had retired purely because of PD at a median age of 53.4 years, the median working time was 1.7 years after established diagnosis. In part-time work, PD patients had been able to continue for a median of 4.3 years. PD often leads to early retirement; compared with the general Finnish population of similar age, PD patients had retired on the average 6 years earlier. Young age, mild symptoms, and short duration of the disease as well as adjustments enabling easier employment were associated with the possibility to continue longer in the work force.
PubMed ID
17183549 View in PubMed
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Resource use and costs in a Swedish cohort of patients with Parkinson's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71485
Source
Mov Disord. 2002 Nov;17(6):1213-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2002
Author
Peter Hagell
Sara Nordling
Jan Reimer
Martin Grabowski
Ulf Persson
Author Affiliation
Section of Restorative Neurology, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. peter.hagell@neurol.lu.se
Source
Mov Disord. 2002 Nov;17(6):1213-20
Date
Nov-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Costs and Cost Analysis
Female
Health Care Costs - statistics & numerical data
Health Resources - economics - utilization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
National Health Programs - economics - utilization
Parkinson Disease - economics - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Utilization Review
Abstract
We estimated resource use and costs in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), thereby providing baseline data for future economic evaluations of therapeutic interventions. Data were collected from medical records of a South Swedish cohort of 127 PD patients during 1 year (1996) and a mailed questionnaire inquiring about cost-related consequences and resource use in 1996 and in 2000. Annual costs were calculated based on prevalence and expressed in SEK (monetary value of the year 2000). Direct health care costs averaged approximately SEK 29,000 ( approximately USD 2,900; EUR 3,200) per patient per year, of which drugs were the most costly component. Nonmedical direct costs were higher than direct health care costs, averaging approximately SEK 43,000 ( approximately USD 4,300; EUR 4,800) per patient per year, and costs due to lost production were approximately SEK 52,000 ( approximately USD 5,200; EUR 5,800) per patient per year. The mean total annual cost for PD in our sample approximated SEK 124,000 ( approximately USD 12,400; EUR 13,800) per patient. These findings are roughly within the same range as estimates from other countries and show that PD causes a considerable societal burden. In addition to other outcomes, evaluations of the economic implications of new therapeutic interventions are highly warranted. In this perspective, the present study provides valuable baseline data.
PubMed ID
12465059 View in PubMed
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7 records – page 1 of 1.