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Associations between family history of Parkinson's disease and dementia and risk of dementia in Parkinson's disease: A community-based, longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80286
Source
Mov Disord. 2006 Dec;21(12):2170-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Kurz Martin Wilhelm
Larsen Jan Petter
Kvaloy Jan Terje
Aarsland Dag
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Heinrich-Heine-University, Düsseldorf, Germany.
Source
Mov Disord. 2006 Dec;21(12):2170-4
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Dementia - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Family Health
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Neurologic Examination
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Parkinson Disease - complications - epidemiology - genetics
Proportional Hazards Models
Residence Characteristics
Risk
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
Dementia is common in patients with Parkinson's disease (PDD). The etiology of PDD is still unclear, but exciting advances have been made in discovering pathogenetic components in Parkinson's disease (PD), implicating the role of genetic factors. It is, however, still controversial whether genetic factors also contribute to the development of dementia in PD. Thus, we investigated the association between development of dementia and a positive family history of PD or dementia in a community-based study of PD in Rogaland County, Norway (n = 219). The patients were followed prospectively with neurological and neuropsychological assessments. Dementia was more common in patients with a strong family association of PD (first-degree relatives > second-degree relatives > no family history; P
PubMed ID
17029273 View in PubMed
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Carnitine levels and mutations in the SLC22A5 gene in Faroes patients with Parkinson's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298366
Source
Neurosci Lett. 2018 05 14; 675:116-119
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-14-2018
Author
Súsanna A Crooks
Sára Bech
Jónrit Halling
Debes H Christiansen
Beate Ritz
Maria Skaalum Petersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine and Public Health, The Faroese Hospital System, Tórshavn, Faroe Islands.
Source
Neurosci Lett. 2018 05 14; 675:116-119
Date
05-14-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiomyopathies - complications
Carnitine - deficiency - metabolism
Case-Control Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hyperammonemia - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Muscular Diseases - complications
Mutation
Parkinson Disease - complications - epidemiology - genetics - metabolism
Solute Carrier Family 22 Member 5 - genetics
Abstract
Mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and energy production have been implicated in the etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). Several agents are under investigation for potential neuroprotective effects including acetyl-l-carnitine (ALC).
To investigate whether low carnitine levels and mutations in the SLC22A5 gene encoding the carnitine transporter are associates with PD risk in the Faroe Islands where the prevalence of both PD and carnitine transporter deficiency (CTD) is high.
We conducted a case-control study with 121 cases and 235 randomly selected controls, matched by gender and age. Blood spots were analyzed for free and total carnitine levels by QUATTRO LC triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and sequencing performed for five genetic mutations in the SLC22A5 gene with ABI PRISM 3130.
PD cases had significantly lower levels of free and total carnitine levels compared with controls (P??G mutation frequency in the SLC22A5 gene among cases and controls (p?=?.70).
Low carnitine levels seem to be associated with PD, but only in individuals without the c.95A?>?G mutation rendering the carnitine transporter less efficient. Thus, the difference in carnitine levels is not caused by a higher frequency of c.95A?>?G mutation carriers in cases. The cause may be dietary or due to different gut microbiota among cases.
PubMed ID
29614331 View in PubMed
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Clinical problems in non-fluctuating patients with Parkinson's disease: a community-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46159
Source
Mov Disord. 2000 Sep;15(5):826-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2000
Author
J P Larsen
K. Karlsen
E. Tandberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Central Hospital of Rogaland, Stavanger, Norway.
Source
Mov Disord. 2000 Sep;15(5):826-9
Date
Sep-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Aged
Antiparkinson Agents - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Dementia - epidemiology - etiology
Depression - epidemiology - etiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Drug Tolerance
Fatigue - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Levodopa - adverse effects
Male
Movement Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Neurologic Examination
Norway - epidemiology
Outpatients
Parkinson Disease - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Prevalence
Psychomotor Performance
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Sleep Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the frequency of nonfluctuators in a community-based prevalence study of Parkinson's disease (PD) and to describe disability, non-motor problems, and health-related quality of life in patients with PD with and without motor fluctuations, and compare the findings to those of two control groups. METHODS: The study involved 245 patients with PD who were participating in a prevalence study and two control groups (100 healthy elderly individuals and 100 patients with diabetes mellitus [DM]). Data were obtained through neurologic examination and a semistructured interview, and by the use of several questionnaires. RESULTS: In this group of unselected patients with PD, 78% did not experience motor fluctuations. Mean duration of treatment with levodopa was 6.3 years. Patients with motor fluctuations had a lower age at onset of disease, longer duration of disease, and a higher daily levodopa dose than patients without fluctuations. Among the non-fluctuating patients, we found more dementia and a higher age at prevalence day. Disability (assessed by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale subscales for activities of daily living and motor function and the Hoehn and Yahr stage) was similar in fluctuators and nonfluctuators. Depression, sleep disturbances, and fatigue were equally frequent in both patient groups. The occurrence of these difficulties was clearly more frequent among non-fluctuating patients with PD than among the control subjects. CONCLUSION: Most patients in the general population who have PD do not experience dose-dependent motor fluctuations. Severity of motor disability and neuropsychiatric manifestations are as important in non-fluctuators as in fluctuators. Patients without motor fluctuations have more depression, sleep disturbances, fatigue, and a poorer health-related quality of life than patients with DM and healthy elderly individuals. This also underlines the importance of developing better management and treatment strategies for this group of patients with PD.
PubMed ID
11009186 View in PubMed
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Cognitive impairment in incident, untreated Parkinson disease: the Norwegian ParkWest study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91193
Source
Neurology. 2009 Mar 31;72(13):1121-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-31-2009
Author
Aarsland D.
Brønnick K.
Larsen J P
Tysnes O B
Alves G.
Author Affiliation
The Norwegian Centre for Movement Disorders, Stavanger University Hospital, PO 8100, N-4068 Stavanger, Norway. daa@sus.no
Source
Neurology. 2009 Mar 31;72(13):1121-6
Date
Mar-31-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cognition Disorders - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests
Norway - epidemiology
Parkinson Disease - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Prospective Studies
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Little is known regarding the cognitive impairment in subjects with early, drug-naïve Parkinson disease (PD). The aim of this study was to explore the proportion with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and subtypes in an incidence cohort of untreated PD in Southern and Western Norway. METHODS: A total of 196 non-demented, drug-naive patients who were recruited after an extensive search of all new cases of PD in the area and 201 healthy control subjects completed a battery of neuropsychological tests of verbal memory, visuospatial, and attentional-executive functioning. Subjects were classified as MCI if the age- and education-corrected z-score was falling 1.5 standard deviations below the mean for at least one of the cognitive domains. RESULTS: The PD group was more impaired on all neuropsychological tests than controls, but the effect sizes were small. The largest effect size was found for verbal memory. A total of 18.9% of the patients with PD were classified as MCI, with a relative risk of 2.1 (1.2-3.6) in PD compared to the control group. Patients with PD with and without MCI did not differ significantly regarding demographic and motor features. Among PD-MCI patients, nearly two-thirds had a non-amnestic MCI subtype, and one third had an amnestic MCI subtype. CONCLUSIONS: The findings demonstrate a twofold increase in the proportion with cognitive impairment in subjects with early, untreated Parkinson disease (PD) compared to controls. This has implications for diagnosis and management of PD. AD = Alzheimer disease; aMCI-MD = amnestic multiple-domain MCI; aMCI-SD = amnestic single-domain MCI; CVLT-2 = California Verbal Learning Test II; IQCode = Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive decline in the elderly; MADRS = Montgomery and Aasberg Depression Rating Scale; MCI = mild cognitive impairment; MMSE = Mini-Mental State Examination; naMCI-MD = non-amnestic multiple-domain MCI; naMCI-SD = non-amnestic single-domain MCI; PD = Parkinson disease; RR = relative risks; UPDRS = Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale; VOSP = Visual Object and Space Perception Battery.
Notes
Comment In: Neurology. 2009 Mar 31;72(13):1116-719332688
PubMed ID
19020293 View in PubMed
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The effect of age of onset of PD on risk of dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77679
Source
J Neurol. 2007 Jan;254(1):38-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Aarsland D.
Kvaløy J T
Andersen K.
Larsen J P
Tang M X
Lolk A.
Kragh-Sørensen P.
Marder K.
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Centre for Movement Disorders, Stavanger University Hospital, Arm Hansen v 20, N-4005, Stavanger, Norway. daa@sir.no
Source
J Neurol. 2007 Jan;254(1):38-45
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Dementia - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Neuropsychological Tests
Parkinson Disease - complications - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk
Survival Analysis
Time Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Dementia occurs in the majority of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Late onset of PD has been reported to be associated with a higher risk for dementia. However, age at onset (AAO) and age at baseline assessment are often correlated. The aim of this study was to explore whether AAO of PD symptoms is a risk factor for dementia independent of the general effect of age. METHODS: Two community-based studies of PD in New York (n=281) and Rogaland county, Norway (n=227) and two population-based groups of healthy elderly from New York (n=180) and Odense, Denmark (n=2414) were followed prospectively for 3-4 years and assessed for dementia according to DSM-IIIR. All PD and control cases underwent neurological examination and were followed with neurological and neuropsychological assessments. We used Cox proportional hazards regression based on three different time scales to explore the effect of AAO of PD on risk of dementia, adjusting for age at baseline and other demographic and clinical variables. FINDINGS: In both PD groups and in the pooled analyses, there was a significant effect of age at baseline assessment on the time to develop dementia, but there was no effect of AAO independent of age itself. Consistent with these results, there was no increased relative effect of age on the time to develop dementia in PD cases compared with controls. INTERPRETATION: This study shows that it is the general effect of age, rather than AAO that is associated with incident dementia in subjects with PD.
PubMed ID
17508138 View in PubMed
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Exploring the Association Between Rosacea and Parkinson Disease: A Danish Nationwide Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282846
Source
JAMA Neurol. 2016 May 01;73(5):529-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-01-2016
Author
Alexander Egeberg
Peter Riis Hansen
Gunnar H Gislason
Jacob P Thyssen
Source
JAMA Neurol. 2016 May 01;73(5):529-34
Date
May-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Community Health Planning
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Parkinson Disease - complications - epidemiology
Rosacea - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Tetracycline - therapeutic use
Young Adult
Abstract
The pathogenesis of rosacea is unclear, but increased matrix metalloproteinase target tissue activity appears to play an important role. Parkinson disease and other neurodegenerative disorders also display increased matrix metalloproteinase activity that contribute to neuronal loss.
To investigate the risk of incident (new-onset) Parkinson disease in patients with rosacea.
A nationwide cohort study of the Danish population was conducted using individual-level linkage of administrative registers. All Danish citizens 18 years or older from January 1, 1997, to December 31, 2011 (N?=?5?472?745), were included. Data analysis was conducted from June 26 to July 27, 2015.
The main outcome was a diagnosis of Parkinson disease. Incidence rates (IRs) per 10?000 person-years were calculated, and incidence rate ratios (IRRs) adjusted for age, sex, socioeconomic status, smoking, alcohol abuse, medication, and comorbidity were estimated by Poisson regression models.
A total of 5 404 692 individuals were included in the reference population; of these, 22?387 individuals (9812 [43.8%] women; mean [SD] age at diagnosis, 75.9 [10.2] years) received a diagnosis of Parkinson disease during the study period and 68?053 individuals (45 712 [67.2%] women; mean age, 42.2 [16.5] years) were registered as having rosacea. The IRs of Parkinson disease per 10?000 person-years were 3.54 (95% CI, 3.49-3.59) in the reference population and 7.62 (95% CI, 6.78-8.57) in patients with rosacea. The adjusted IRR of Parkinson disease was 1.71 (95%, CI 1.52-1.92) in patients with rosacea compared with the reference population. There was a 2-fold increased risk of Parkinson disease in patients classified as having ocular rosacea (adjusted IRR, 2.03 [95% CI, 1.67-2.48]), and tetracycline therapy appeared to reduce the risk of Parkinson disease (adjusted IRR, 0.98 [95% CI, 0.97-0.99]).
Rosacea constitutes an independent risk factor for Parkinson disease. This association could be due to shared pathogenic mechanisms involving elevated matrix metalloproteinase activity. The clinical consequences of this association require further study.
Notes
Comment In: BMJ. 2016;352:i166027025776
PubMed ID
26999031 View in PubMed
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Familial aggregation of Parkinson's disease may affect progression of motor symptoms and dementia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287959
Source
Mov Disord. 2017 Feb;32(2):241-245
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Johannes Jernqvist Gaare
Geir Olve Skeie
Charalampos Tzoulis
Jan Petter Larsen
Ole-Bjørn Tysnes
Source
Mov Disord. 2017 Feb;32(2):241-245
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Aged
Dementia - epidemiology - etiology
Disease Progression
Endophenotypes
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Status and Dementia Tests
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Parkinson Disease - complications - epidemiology
Pedigree
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Familial aggregation has been described in PD of both early and late onset, but has not been studied in a true population-based sample. Moreover, little is known about its association with disease progression and endophenotypes.
The objectives of this work were to determine familial aggregation of idiopathic PD in a population-based cohort and study the association with clinical endophenotypes and disease progression.
We examined family history data from the Norwegian ParkWest study, a well-characterized, population-based cohort of incident PD patients and age-matched healthy controls. Family data were collected at baseline with a simplified questionnaire (192 cases and 193 controls) and after 3 years of longitudinal follow-up using an extended questionnaire (172 cases and 171 controls).
Compared to the controls, the PD patients had an increased relative risk of having a first-degree relative with PD when using the extended questionnaire (relative risk = 1.988; P = 0.036), but not when using the simplified questionnaire (relative risk = 1.453; P = 0.224). There was no significant difference in age of onset or motor subtype (P = 0.801). However, cases with a family history of PD had reduced progression over 7 years as measured by UPDRS II (P = 0.008) and smaller rate of decrease of MMSE (P = 0.046).
Our findings confirm familial aggregation in a population-based cohort of idiopathic PD. Moreover, we show that positive family history of PD in patients is associated with a slower progression of PD symptoms and cognitive decline. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.
PubMed ID
27862270 View in PubMed
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Fatigue in Parkinson's disease: prevalence and associated factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139811
Source
Mov Disord. 2010 Oct 30;25(14):2456-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-30-2010
Author
Antoine G Beiske
Jon Håvard Loge
Marianne J Hjermstad
Elisabeth Svensson
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Akershus University Hospital, Norway. abeiske@online.no
Source
Mov Disord. 2010 Oct 30;25(14):2456-60
Date
Oct-30-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Fatigue - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Parkinson Disease - complications - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the prevalence of fatigue in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and compare this to the general population. Factors associated with fatigue were investigated by linear regression. Fatigue was assessed by the fatigue questionnaire. The mean age of the 176 PD patients (41% women) was 69 years (range 35-90), and the mean UPDRSIII was 22.3 (SD 11.7). Fatigue levels (means) were significantly higher in PD patients compared with the general population; however, effect sizes were moderate for women for physical and total fatigue indicating clinically significant differences here only. Only female PD patients had more chronic fatigue than the general population. Fatigue was related to characteristics of PD but also to sleep disturbance, depression, and gender. This population-based study demonstrates that fatigue is a common symptom in PD patients, but compared with the general population, clinically significant differences were only found for female PD patients.
PubMed ID
20976741 View in PubMed
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Heritability of Parkinson disease in Swedish twins: a longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135390
Source
Neurobiol Aging. 2011 Oct;32(10):1923.e1-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Karin Wirdefeldt
Margaret Gatz
Chandra A Reynolds
Carol A Prescott
Nancy L Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. karin.wirdefeldt@ki.se
Source
Neurobiol Aging. 2011 Oct;32(10):1923.e1-8
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology - genetics - mortality
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Mood Disorders - etiology - genetics
Parkinson Disease - complications - epidemiology - genetics - mortality
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Survival Analysis
Sweden
Abstract
Previous twin studies report no heritability of Parkinson's disease (PD) based on cross sectional information. Here, we apply a longitudinal design and re-evaluate cross sectional data in the population-based Swedish Twin Registry (STR) using clinical as well as hospital discharge and cause of death diagnoses. In the longitudinal analyses (based on 46,436 individuals), we identified 542 twins with PD and 65 twins with Parkinsonism. Concordance rates for PD were 11% for monozygotic and 4% for same-sexed dizygotic twin pairs, with a heritability estimate of 34%. Concordance rates for PD or parkinsonism were 13% for monozygotic and 5% for same-sexed dizygotic twin pairs, with a heritability estimate of 40%. In the cross sectional analyses (based on 49,814 individuals), we identified 287 twins with PD and 79 twins with parkinsonism. Concordance rates for PD were 4% for monozygotic and same-sexed dizygotic twin pairs and 0 for opposite-sexed twin pairs. Concordance rates for PD or parkinsonism were somewhat higher but the heritability estimate was nonsignificant. Our longitudinal analyses demonstrate that PD and parkinsonism are modestly heritable.
PubMed ID
21482443 View in PubMed
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Is fatigue an independent and persistent symptom in patients with Parkinson disease?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45751
Source
Neurology. 2004 Nov 23;63(10):1908-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-23-2004
Author
G. Alves
T. Wentzel-Larsen
J P Larsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Rogaland Central Hospital, Stavanger, Norway.
Source
Neurology. 2004 Nov 23;63(10):1908-11
Date
Nov-23-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Chronic Disease
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Depression - epidemiology
Disease Progression
Fatigue - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mental Fatigue - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Parkinson Disease - complications - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate if mental fatigue is a symptom that appears independently from other clinical features in patients with Parkinson disease (PD), and to study if fatigue is persistent over time in these patients. METHODS: In 1993, 233 patients with PD were included in a community-based study of fatigue and followed prospectively over 8 years. Fatigue was measured by a combination of a seven-point scale and parts of the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) at baseline and after 4 and 8 years. In addition, the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) was used to evaluate fatigue in 2001. Population-averaged logistic regression models for correlated data were performed to study the relationship between fatigue and various demographic and clinical variables. RESULTS: In patients who were followed throughout the 8-year study period, fatigue increased from 35.7% in 1993 to 42.9% in 1997 and 55.7% in 2001. Fatigue was related to disease progression, depression, and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). However, the prevalence of fatigue in patients without depression and EDS remained high and increased from 32.1% to 38.9% during the study period. For about 44% of the patients with fatigue the presence of this symptom varied during the study period, as it was persistent in 56% of the patients with fatigue. CONCLUSIONS: The authors confirmed the high prevalence of mental fatigue in patients with Parkinson disease (PD). Fatigue is related to other non-motor features such as depression and excessive daytime sleepiness, but cannot be explained by this comorbidity alone. In more than half of the patients mental fatigue is persistent and seems to be an independent symptom that develops parallel to the progressive neurodegenerative disorder of PD.
PubMed ID
15557510 View in PubMed
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24 records – page 1 of 3.