Skip header and navigation

Refine By

1505 records – page 1 of 151.

The ability to taste PTC among Swedish men and women (nulliparae and others).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature66946
Source
Acta Genet Med Gemellol (Roma). 1965 Oct;14(4):417-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1965
Author
T. Romanus
Source
Acta Genet Med Gemellol (Roma). 1965 Oct;14(4):417-20
Date
Oct-1965
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Male
Parity
Phenylthiourea
Pregnancy
Sweden
Taste
PubMed ID
5882608 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abnormal bleeding associated with preeclampsia: a population study of 315,085 pregnancies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90728
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2009;88(2):154-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Eskild Anne
Vatten Lars J
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Akershus University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2009;88(2):154-8
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cesarean Section
Delivery, Obstetric
Female
Humans
Parity
Postpartum Hemorrhage - etiology
Pre-Eclampsia
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Uterine Hemorrhage - complications
Abstract
ObjeCTIVE: To study the association of preeclampsia with abnormal bleeding in the first trimester and after delivery. DESIGN: Register-based population study. Setting. The Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Population. A total of 315,085 women in Norway with singleton deliveries after 21 weeks of gestation (1999-2004). METHODS: We compared frequencies of vaginal bleeding in the first trimester between women who subsequently developed preeclampsia and women without preeclampsia development, and made similar comparisons for postpartum bleeding. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Proportion of women with bleeding. RESULTS: In the first trimester, vaginal bleeding occurred in 1.6% (215/13,166) of subsequent preeclampsia cases, compared to 2.0% (6,112/301,919) of normotensives (p1,500 mL) occurred in 3.0% (399/13,166) of preeclampsia cases and in 1.4% (4,223/301,919) of normotensives (p500 mL) was also more common in preeclampsia cases (22.9% versus 13.9%, p
PubMed ID
19093234 View in PubMed
Less detail

Absence of association between reproductive variables and the risk of breast cancer in young women in Sweden and Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25167
Source
Br J Cancer. 1990 Jul;62(1):122-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1990
Author
H O Adami
R. Bergström
E. Lund
O. Meirik
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Br J Cancer. 1990 Jul;62(1):122-6
Date
Jul-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous
Age Factors
Breast Feeding
Breast Neoplasms - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Menstrual Cycle
Multivariate Analysis
Norway
Parity
Pregnancy
Reproduction
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
A population-based case-control study was conducted in Sweden and Norway to analyse possible associations between breast cancer occurring before the age of 45 and several different characteristics of the women's reproductive life. A total of 422 (89.2%) of all eligible patients, and 527 (80.6%) of all eligible controls were interviewed. In univariate analyses, different characteristics of child-bearing (parity, age at first birth, years between last birth and diagnosis, duration of breast-feeding, and number of induced and spontaneous abortions), measures of the fertile or ovulating period (age at menarche, years between menarche and first pregnancy, and estimates of the menstruation span) and symptoms of anovulatory cycles or infertility were all seemingly unrelated to, or at most weakly associated with breast cancer. Adjustment for possible confounding factors in multivariate analyses resulted in largely unaltered risk estimates with odds ratios close to unity and without any significant trends when the exposure variables were studied in categorised or in continuous form. We conclude that reproductive factors did not explain the occurrence of breast cancer before the age of 45 in this population.
PubMed ID
2390471 View in PubMed
Less detail

Absence of the common Insulin-like growth factor-1 19-repeat allele is associated with early age at breast cancer diagnosis in multiparous women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78723
Source
Br J Cancer. 2007 Mar 12;96(5):712-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-12-2007
Author
Bågeman E.
Ingvar C.
Rose C.
Jernström H.
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, SE-221 85 Lund, Sweden.
Source
Br J Cancer. 2007 Mar 12;96(5):712-7
Date
Mar-12-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alleles
Breast Neoplasms - genetics
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Humans
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - genetics
Middle Aged
Parity
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Pregnancy
Abstract
Multiparity decreases the risk of breast cancer in white women, whereas it is a risk factor in black women
PubMed ID
17311016 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accidental out-of-hospital births in Finland: incidence and geographical distribution 1963-1995.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202145
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1999 May;78(5):372-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1999
Author
K. Viisainen
M. Gissler
A L Hartikainen
E. Hemminki
Author Affiliation
STAKES (National Research and Development Centre for Welfare and Health), University of Helsinki, Department of Public Health, Finland.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1999 May;78(5):372-8
Date
May-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth weight
Delivery Rooms - statistics & numerical data
Delivery, obstetric - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Gestational Age
Hospitals - standards
Hospitals, Maternity - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Infant, Newborn
Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Parity
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care
Rural Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Urban Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The study aims to describe the incidence and geographical distribution of accidental out-of-hospital births (accidental births) in Finland in relation to the changes in the hospital network, and to compare the perinatal outcomes of accidental births and all hospital births.
Data for the incidence and distribution analyses of accidental births were obtained from the official statistics between 1962 and 1973 and from the national Medical Birth Registry (MBR) in 1992-1993. The infant outcomes were analyzed for the MBR data in 1991-1995.
Between 1963 and 1975 the central hospital network expanded and by 1975 they covered 72% of births. The number of small maternity units has decreased since 1963. The incidence of accidental births decreased between 1963 and 1973, from 1.3 to 0.4 per 1000 births, and rose by the 1990s to 1/1000. In the 1990s the parity adjusted risk of an accidental birth was higher for residents of northern than of southern Finland, OR 2.51 (CI 1.75-3.60), and for residents of rural compared to urban municipalities, OR 3.26 (CI 2.48-4.27). The birthweight adjusted risk for a perinatal death was higher in accidental births than in hospital births, OR 3.11 (CI 1.42-6.84).
A temporal correlation between closing of small hospitals and an increase in accidental birth rates was detected. Due to the poor infant outcomes of accidental births, centralization policies should include measures to their prevention.
PubMed ID
10326879 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accounting for measurement error in human life history trade-offs using structural equation modeling.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302208
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2018 03; 30(2):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2018
Author
Samuli Helle
Author Affiliation
Section of Ecology, Department of Biology, University of Turku, 20014, Finland.
Source
Am J Hum Biol. 2018 03; 30(2):
Date
03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Female
Finland
Humans
Latent Class Analysis
Life History Traits
Models, Biological
Parity
Regression Analysis
Reproduction
Abstract
Revealing causal effects from correlative data is very challenging and a contemporary problem in human life history research owing to the lack of experimental approach. Problems with causal inference arising from measurement error in independent variables, whether related either to inaccurate measurement technique or validity of measurements, seem not well-known in this field. The aim of this study is to show how structural equation modeling (SEM) with latent variables can be applied to account for measurement error in independent variables when the researcher has recorded several indicators of a hypothesized latent construct.
As a simple example of this approach, measurement error in lifetime allocation of resources to reproduction in Finnish preindustrial women is modelled in the context of the survival cost of reproduction. In humans, lifetime energetic resources allocated in reproduction are almost impossible to quantify with precision and, thus, typically used measures of lifetime reproductive effort (e.g., lifetime reproductive success and parity) are likely to be plagued by measurement error. These results are contrasted with those obtained from a traditional regression approach where the single best proxy of lifetime reproductive effort available in the data is used for inference.
As expected, the inability to account for measurement error in women's lifetime reproductive effort resulted in the underestimation of its underlying effect size on post-reproductive survival.
This article emphasizes the advantages that the SEM framework can provide in handling measurement error via multiple-indicator latent variables in human life history studies.
PubMed ID
29130592 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adaption of pregnancy anxiety questionnaire-revised for all pregnant women regardless of parity: PRAQ-R2.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279025
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2016 Feb;19(1):125-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
A C Huizink
M J Delforterie
N M Scheinin
M. Tolvanen
L. Karlsson
H. Karlsson
Source
Arch Womens Ment Health. 2016 Feb;19(1):125-32
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety - diagnosis - psychology
Anxiety Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Delivery, Obstetric - methods
Female
Finland
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Parity
Parturition
Predictive value of tests
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women - psychology
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Reproducibility of Results
Surveys and Questionnaires - standards
Abstract
The 10-item Pregnancy-Related Anxiety Questionnaire-Revised (PRAQ-R) is a widely used instrument to assess and identify pregnancy-specific anxiety in nulliparous women. It has good psychometric values and predictive validity for birth and childhood outcomes. Nonetheless, the PRAQ-R is not designed for use in parous women, as particularly one item of the questionnaire is not relevant for women who gave birth before. We tested the factorial and scalar invariance of a modified PRAQ-R2 across nulliparous and parous women with an adapted item to fit both groups of pregnant women. A longitudinal study among 1144 pregnant women (n = 608 nulliparous and n = 536 parous) with two repeated measures of the PRAQ-R2 was used to test for measurement invariance of the instrument. Results show metric and scalar invariance, indicating that the PRAQ-R2 measures similar constructs on the same scale for all pregnant women at two different times during pregnancy. We conclude that the PRAQ-R2 can be used, compared, or combined in a sample of nulliparous and parous women.
Notes
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2002 Sep;41(9):1078-8512218429
Cites: J Sch Psychol. 2012 Apr;50(2):215-3422386121
Cites: Early Hum Dev. 2004 Sep;79(2):81-9115324989
Cites: J Psychosom Obstet Gynaecol. 1997 Dec;18(4):266-729443136
Cites: Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2005 Feb;14(1):41-5115756515
Cites: Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2005 Apr;29(2):259-6915811497
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2006 Apr;107(4):798-80616582115
Cites: Prenat Diagn. 2006 Apr;26(4):354-6116511902
Cites: Med Care. 2006 Nov;44(11 Suppl 3):S69-7717060838
Cites: Psychosom Med. 2006 Nov-Dec;68(6):938-4617079701
Cites: Curr Opin Psychiatry. 2012 Mar;25(2):141-822262028
Cites: Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2010 Jan;35(1):141-5319674845
Cites: BJOG. 2008 Apr;115(5):607-1518333942
Cites: Arch Womens Ment Health. 2013 Oct;16(5):363-923558948
Cites: Best Pract Res Clin Obstet Gynaecol. 2014 Jan;28(1):25-3524090740
Cites: Women Health. 2014;54(5):474-8524794917
Cites: J Psychosom Obstet Gynaecol. 2014 Sep;35(3):92-10025093467
Cites: J Health Psychol. 2015 Feb;20(2):164-7224058121
Cites: J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2003 Sep;44(6):810-812959490
PubMed ID
25971851 View in PubMed
Less detail

The adequacy of prenatal care and incidence of low birthweight among the poor in Washington State and British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218009
Source
Am J Public Health. 1994 Jun;84(6):986-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
S J Katz
R W Armstrong
J P LoGerfo
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.
Source
Am J Public Health. 1994 Jun;84(6):986-91
Date
Jun-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Maternal Age
Medicaid
National Health Programs
Odds Ratio
Parity
Poverty
Prenatal Care
Quality of Health Care
Risk factors
United States
Washington - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine differences in adequacy of prenatal care and incidence of low birthweight between low-income women with Medicaid in Washington State and low-income women with Canadian provincial health insurance in British Columbia.
A population-based cross-sectional study was done by using linked birth certificates and claims data.
Overall, the adjusted odds ratio for inadequate prenatal care in Washington (comparing women with Medicaid with those with private insurance) was 3.2. However, the risk varied by time of Medicaid enrollment relative to pregnancy (2.0, 1.0, 2.7, 6.3; for women who enrolled prior to pregnancy, during the first trimester, during the second trimester, or during the third trimester, respectively). In British Columbia, the adjusted odds ratio for inadequate care (comparing women receiving a health premium subsidy with those receiving no subsidy) was 1.5 for women receiving a 100% subsidy and 1.2 for women receiving a 95% subsidy. The risk for low birthweight followed a similar trend in both regions, but there was no association with enrollment period in Washington.
Overall, the risk for inadequate prenatal care among poor women was much greater in Washington than in British Columbia. Most of the difference was due to Washington women's delayed enrollment in Medicaid. In both regions, the poor were at similar risk for low birthweight relative to their more affluent counterparts.
Notes
Cites: Health Serv Res. 1988 Aug;23(3):359-803403275
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 1989 May-Jun;5(3):157-632663051
Cites: Health Care Financ Rev. 1989 Summer;10(4):1-1510313273
Cites: JAMA. 1990 Nov 7;264(17):2219-232214099
Cites: Public Health Rep. 1990 Sep-Oct;105(5):533-52120734
Cites: Health Aff (Millwood). 1990 Winter;9(4):91-1112289763
Cites: J Health Polit Policy Law. 1987 Summer;12(2):221-353302000
Cites: Fam Plann Perspect. 1991 May-Jun;23(3):123-81860478
Cites: JAMA. 1993 Jan 6;269(1):87-918416413
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1980 Sep;70(9):964-737406096
Cites: JAMA. 1986 Jan 3;255(1):48-523940304
Cites: J Chronic Dis. 1987;40(1):41-93805233
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1991 Aug;81(8):1013-61853992
PubMed ID
8203697 View in PubMed
Less detail

Advanced Maternal Age and Stillbirth Risk in Nulliparous and Parous Women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267363
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2015 Aug;126(2):355-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Ulla Waldenström
Sven Cnattingius
Mikael Norman
Erica Schytt
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2015 Aug;126(2):355-62
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body mass index
Female
Humans
Maternal Age
Middle Aged
Parity
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
Registries
Reproductive history
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Stillbirth - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To investigate the association between advanced maternal age and stillbirth risks in first, second, third, and fourth births or more.
A population-based registry study including all women aged 25 years and older with singleton pregnancies at 28 weeks of gestation and later gave birth in Sweden from 1990 to 2011; 1,804,442 pregnancies were analyzed. In each parity group, the risk of stillbirth at age 30-34 years, 35-39 years, and 40 years and older compared with age 25-29 years was investigated by logistic regression analyses adjusted for sociodemographic factors, smoking, body mass index, history of stillbirth, and interdelivery interval. Also, two low-risk groups were investigated: women with a high level of education and nonsmoking women of normal weight.
Stillbirth rates increased by maternal age: 25-29 years 0.27%; 30-34 years 0.31%; 35-39 years 0.40%; and 40 years or older 0.53%. Stillbirth risk increased by maternal age in first births. Compared with age 25-29 years, this increase was approximately 25% at 30-34 years and doubled at age 35 years. In second, third, and fourth birth or more, stillbirth risk increased with maternal age in women with a low and middle level of education, but not in women with high education. In nonsmokers of normal weight, the risk in second births increased from age 35 years or older and in third births or more from age 30 years or older.
Advanced maternal age is an independent risk factor for stillbirth in nulliparous women. This age-related risk is reduced or eliminated in parous women, possibly as a result of physiologic adaptations during the first pregnancy.
II.
PubMed ID
26241426 View in PubMed
Less detail

1505 records – page 1 of 151.