Skip header and navigation

Refine By

149 records – page 1 of 15.

Advice seeking and appropriate use of a pediatric emergency department.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220581
Source
Am J Dis Child. 1993 Aug;147(8):863-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1993
Author
T F Oberlander
I B Pless
G E Dougherty
Author Affiliation
Department of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, Children's Hospital, Boston, MA.
Source
Am J Dis Child. 1993 Aug;147(8):863-7
Date
Aug-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Algorithms
Birth Order
Child
Child, Preschool
Counseling - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Health Services Misuse - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Research
Hospitals, Pediatric - utilization
Hospitals, Teaching - utilization
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Parents - education - psychology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Quebec
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Abstract
To determine whether seeking advice prior to an unscheduled visit to a pediatric emergency department (PED) influences appropriate use of this setting for minor illnesses.
Cross-sectional questionnaire survey.
The medical emergency department of the Montreal (Quebec) Children's Hospital, a major referral and urban teaching hospital.
Four hundred eighty-nine of 562 consecutive parents visiting the PED over two periods, one in February and the other in July 1989.
None.
Parents of children between 0 and 18 years of age visiting the PED were asked whether they had previously sought advice from family, friends, or a physician. Other factors possibly related to the decision to seek care were also measured. Appropriateness was rated, blind to discharge diagnosis, by two pediatricians using a structured series of questions incorporating the child's age, time of the visit, clinical state, and problem at presentation. Thirty-four percent of visits among respondents were judged appropriate. In bivariate analysis, appropriate visits occurred significantly more often when a parent spoke to both a physician and a nonphysician (47%) prior to visiting the PED than when no advice was sought (29%; P
PubMed ID
8352220 View in PubMed
Less detail

An assessment of outcomes following parents' participation in a child abuse prevention program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189451
Source
Violence Vict. 2002 Jun;17(3):355-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Martine Hébert
Francine Lavoie
Nathalie Parent
Author Affiliation
Département de sexologie, Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada. hebert.m@uqam.ca
Source
Violence Vict. 2002 Jun;17(3):355-72
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Abuse - prevention & control - psychology
Child Abuse, Sexual - prevention & control - psychology
Education
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Incest - prevention & control - psychology
Male
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Parenting - psychology
Parents - education - psychology
Quebec
Self Disclosure
Self Efficacy
Sex Education
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes following participation in the ESPACE parents' workshop. A group of 55 parents who participated in the program, implemented in elementary schools in the Quebec city region, was compared to a group of 217 parents who did not attend the prevention workshop. The results revealed that attending parents suggested more adequate interventions to the vignette depicting a hypothetical situation of sexual abuse compared to nonattending parents. Attending parents are found to be more likely to suggest interventions sustaining the child in her own problem-solving process, seek help from specialized agencies, and attempt to offer emotional support to the victim. Data also reveal that the parents workshop has a positive outcome on knowledge. While the workshop is associated with beneficial outcomes, attendance rates are low. The findings are discussed in the context of identifying means to foster parent involvement in the prevention of child abuse.
PubMed ID
12102058 View in PubMed
Less detail

An evaluation of training in motivational interviewing for nurses in child health services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124046
Source
Behav Cogn Psychother. 2013 May;41(3):329-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Benjamin Bohman
Lars Forsberg
Ata Ghaderi
Finn Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Behav Cogn Psychother. 2013 May;41(3):329-43
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child Health Services
Child, Preschool
Clinical Competence
Cross-Sectional Studies
Curriculum
Education
Exercise
Female
Food Habits
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Motivational Interviewing
Obesity - epidemiology - nursing - prevention & control - psychology
Parents - education - psychology
Pediatric Nursing - education
Sweden
Abstract
Acquiring proficiency in motivational interviewing (MI) may be more difficult than generally believed, and training research suggests that the standard one-time workshop format may be insufficient. Although nurses represent one of the professions that have received most training in MI, training in this group has rarely been systematically evaluated using objective behavioral measures.
To evaluate an enhanced MI training program, comprising a 3.5-day workshop, systematic feedback on MI performance, and four sessions of supervision on practice samples.
Nurses (n = 36) in Swedish child health services were trained in MI. Skillfulness in MI was assessed using the Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity (MITI) Code. Effects of training were compared to beginning proficiency thresholds.
Participants did not reach beginning proficiency thresholds on any of the indicators of proficiency and effect sizes were small.
The present study adds to a growing body of literature suggesting that the current standard MI training format may not provide practitioners with enough skillfulness. Moreover, the results indicate that even enhanced training, including systematic feedback and supervision, may not be sufficient. Suggestions for improved MI training are made.
PubMed ID
22632171 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association of personality characteristics with parenting problems among alcoholic couples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206216
Source
Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 1998 Feb;24(1):119-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1998
Author
W A Gallant
K M Gorey
M D Gallant
J L Perry
P K Ryan
Author Affiliation
School of Social Work, University of Windsor, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 1998 Feb;24(1):119-29
Date
Feb-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aftercare - psychology
Alcoholism - psychology - rehabilitation
Child
Child Rearing - psychology
Comorbidity
Empathy
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Parenting - psychology
Parents - education - psychology
Personality Disorders - psychology - rehabilitation
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Abstract
This retrospective cross-sectional study explored the associations of personality characteristics with parenting problems among 25 couples, one or both members of which were identified as alcoholics by virtue of their voluntary past completion of a residential program for alcoholics. Most of them (90%) scored lower, indicating their more problematic parental attitudes and behaviors, on all four scales of the Adult-Adolescent Parenting Inventory (AAPI: inappropriate parental expectations of children, lack empathy for children's needs, value physical punishment, and parent-child role reversal) than average "normal" nonalcoholic, nonabusive adults. Such parenting problems were found to be very highly associated with clients' personality characteristics. For example, schizoid, schizotypal, histrionic, and passive aggressive characteristics (DSM-III-R-based) along with a few other personal characteristics of the couples, accounted for nearly all (90.2%, R2 = .902) of their propensity to reverse roles with their children. Findings also suggested that the identified parenting problems among alcoholic couples are amenable to programmatic intervention: the longer couples had participated in aftercare programs offered by the treatment facility the more appropriate and empathetic was their parenting.
PubMed ID
9513633 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations of physical activity and sedentary behavior with academic skills--a follow-up study among primary school children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271381
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(9):e107031
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Eero A Haapala
Anna-Maija Poikkeus
Katriina Kukkonen-Harjula
Tuomo Tompuri
Niina Lintu
Juuso Väistö
Paavo H T Leppänen
David E Laaksonen
Virpi Lindi
Timo A Lakka
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(9):e107031
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Cognition - physiology
Comprehension - physiology
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Mathematics - education
Motor Activity - physiology
Parents - education - psychology
Reading
Schools
Sedentary lifestyle
Students - psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
There are no prospective studies that would have compared the relationships of different types of physical activity (PA) and sedentary behavior (SB) with academic skills among children. We therefore investigated the associations of different types of PA and SB with reading and arithmetic skills in a follow-up study among children.
The participants were 186 children (107 boys, 79 girls, 6-8 yr) who were followed-up in Grades 1-3. PA and SB were assessed using a questionnaire in Grade 1. Reading fluency, reading comprehension and arithmetic skills were assessed using standardized tests at the end of Grades 1-3.
Among all children more recess PA and more time spent in SB related to academic skills were associated with a better reading fluency across Grades 1-3. In boys, higher levels of total PA, physically active school transportation and more time spent in SB related to academic skills were associated with a better reading fluency across the Grades 1-3. Among girls, higher levels of total PA were related to worse arithmetic skills across Grades 1-3. Moreover, total PA was directly associated with reading fluency and arithmetic skills in Grades 1-3 among girls whose parents had a university degree, whereas these relationships were inverse in girls of less educated parents.
Total PA, physically active school transportation and SB related to academic skills may be beneficial for the development of reading skills in boys, whereas factors that are independent of PA or SB may be more important for academic skills in girls.
ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01803776.
Notes
Cites: Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Dec;20(12):2406-1122546743
Cites: Dev Sci. 2011 Sep;14(5):1046-5821884320
Cites: Pediatrics. 2013 Jan;131(1):183-823277311
Cites: J Pediatr. 2013 Mar;162(3):543-5123084704
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2013;10:523320538
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2013 Nov;45(11):2098-10423591292
Cites: Br J Sports Med. 2014 Feb;48(3):265-7024149097
Cites: Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2014 Feb;24(1):1-1023600729
Cites: J Sports Sci. 2014;32(7):652-924279412
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2014;46(5):1016-2424126966
Cites: J Am Heart Assoc. 2014;3(2):e00059424755150
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2014;11:5524766669
Cites: Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2015 Jan;35(1):21-3324325400
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2011;8:9821936895
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012 Jan;166(1):49-5522213750
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2012;9:3422462550
Cites: J Dev Behav Pediatr. 2012 Jul;33(6):486-9422617499
Cites: Int J Obes (Lond). 2012 Jul;36(7):950-522665136
Cites: Prev Med. 2008 Jan;46(1):60-217628653
Cites: Neuroscience. 2009 Mar 31;159(3):1044-5419356688
Cites: Prev Med. 2009 Oct;49(4):336-4119665037
Cites: Behav Res Methods. 2009 Nov;41(4):1149-6019897823
Cites: J Pediatr. 2009 Dec;155(6):914-918.e119643438
Cites: J Sch Health. 2010 Jan;80(1):31-720051088
Cites: Health Educ Res. 2010 Apr;25(2):368-7919762353
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2010 Aug;42(8):1609-1620139790
Cites: Circulation. 2010 Oct 19;122(16):1604-1120921439
Cites: J Sports Sci. 2010 Dec;28(14):1605-1421104520
Cites: Health Psychol. 2011 Jan;30(1):91-821299297
Cites: Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2011 Mar;31(2):132-821054767
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011 Apr;165(4):300-521135316
Cites: Health Rep. 2011 Mar;22(1):15-2321510586
Cites: Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2011;8:3321492482
Cites: Prev Med. 2011 Jun;52 Suppl 1:S10-2021291905
Cites: Br J Sports Med. 2011 Sep;45(11):859-6521836170
Cites: Trends Neurosci. 2002 Jun;25(6):295-30112086747
Cites: Acta Psychol (Amst). 2003 Mar;112(3):297-32412595152
Cites: Pediatrics. 2004 Jun;113(6):1715-2215173496
Cites: Nutr Rev. 1996 Apr;54(4 Pt 2):S32-68700451
Cites: Res Q Exerc Sport. 1999 Jun;70(2):127-3410380244
Cites: Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2005 Jul;159(7):607-1315996991
Cites: Dev Psychol. 2006 Nov;42(6):1128-4217087547
Cites: Health Educ Res. 2007 Feb;22(1):70-8016766605
Cites: Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2007 Feb;39(2):371-617277603
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2007 Jun;32(6):509-1617533067
Cites: Behav Res Methods. 2007 May;39(2):175-9117695343
Cites: Trends Neurosci. 2007 Sep;30(9):464-7217765329
Cites: Nat Rev Neurosci. 2008 Jan;9(1):58-6518094706
Cites: Science. 2011 Aug 19;333(6045):968-7021852488
Cites: J Sch Psychol. 2012 Dec;50(6):799-82323245501
PubMed ID
25207813 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Attitudes and knowledge among parents who do not want their children to be vaccinated against measles, mumps and rubella (MFR-vaccination)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37217
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Mar 4;153(10):705-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-4-1991
Author
J. Haurum
M. Johansen
Author Affiliation
Aarhus Universitet, Socialmedicinsk Institut.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Mar 4;153(10):705-9
Date
Mar-4-1991
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
English Abstract
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Immunization Schedule
Infant
Male
Measles Vaccine - adverse effects
Mumps Vaccine - adverse effects
Parents - education - psychology
Questionnaires
Rubella Vaccine - adverse effects
Abstract
In a questionnaire investigation concerning attitudes to and knowledge about MFR vaccination among 81 parents who did not want their children to be vaccinated against measles, mumps and German measles, the parents could be divided into two main groups with reasons formulated in advance: 41% stated that "infectious diseases are beneficial for children" including here their somatic and mental development and the parent-child relationship. The remaining parents based their attitudes on defective knowledge about MFR vaccination, fear of side effects, erroneous contraindications and attitudes such as: the MFR diseases are not serious and vaccination may cause serious disease, does not protect effectively or lowers the resistance of the population and that economy is a poor argument in favour of vaccination. Parents who were critical about the total information concerning the MFR programme were also more critical about their general practitioner than the remaining parents. 80% stated that the MFR programme had been introduced because it involved social economy while 56% thought that health benefits were the reason. It is concluded that further well-directed information about the MFR programme is essential, if the necessary vaccine coverage is to be obtained.
PubMed ID
2008713 View in PubMed
Less detail

The baby was the focus of attention - first-time parents' experiences of their intimate relationship.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58452
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2001;15(4):318-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
T. Ahlborg
M. Strandmark
Author Affiliation
Master of Nursing, Post-Graduate Student at the Nordic School of Public Health (NHV), Göteborg, Sweden. tone.ahlborg@nhv
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2001;15(4):318-25
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Attention
Attitude to Health
Communication
Conflict (Psychology)
Female
Humans
Infant
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental health
Models, Psychological
Nursing Methodology Research
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting - psychology
Parents - education - psychology
Parity
Qualitative Research
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - prevention & control - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The baby was the focus of attention - first-time parents' experience of their intimate relationship. The purpose of this study was to describe the phenomenon of 'first-time parents' intimate relationship', to focus on their mental health, and the ability to support them professionally. Ten Swedish parents (five couples) were interviewed on two occasions, when the first baby was 6 and 18 months old, respectively. A descriptive phenomenological method was used. The findings show that the essence of the phenomenon is 'The baby was the focus of attention'. This had different meanings for the couples, putting them in two categories. For the first category, the essence was that the baby was the focus of mutual concern, which implied a fostered relationship. The strain of parenthood in this category was mild. In the second category, the baby was focused on at the expense of the father, who felt rejected emotionally. This impaired the relationship and parenthood involved a severe strain. The way the spouses communicated differed between the two categories. This study shows that mental health can be affected, especially among first-time fathers, and this could jeopardize the relationship and family health. An awareness of this fact is needed among the health professionals giving care to first-time parents.
PubMed ID
12453173 View in PubMed
Less detail

Being invigorated in parenthood: parents' experiences of being supported by professionals when having a disabled child.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29590
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2005 Aug;20(4):288-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Britt-Marie Lindblad
Birgit H Rasmussen
Per-Olov Sandman
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, University of Borås, Sweden. Britt-Marie.Lindblad@hb.se
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2005 Aug;20(4):288-97
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Child
Child, Preschool
Cooperative Behavior
Disabled Children - psychology
Empathy
Female
Health services needs and demand
Holistic Health
Humans
Male
Narration
Nursing Methodology Research
Parents - education - psychology
Power (Psychology)
Professional-Family Relations
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self Efficacy
Social Support
Sweden
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to know the meaning of parents' experiences of being supported by professionals when having a child with disability. Data were obtained through unstructured interviews with 16 parents within 10 families and analyzed by a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach. Parents narrated experiences of being supported and not being supported, and the findings are presented as contrasting meanings. Being supported by professionals means gaining confidence as a parent and having the child seen as valuable. This is interpreted as being invigorated in parenthood, where sharing the mutual task and goal, which is the child's best, with professionals is a crucial aspect. The meaning of experiences of lack of support illuminates the consequences for the entire family's well-being and the struggle parents experience to gain confidence as parents and recognition of the child as valuable.
PubMed ID
16030510 View in PubMed
Less detail

Beliefs and expectations of Canadian parents who bring febrile children for medical care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120827
Source
Pediatrics. 2012 Oct;130(4):e905-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Mark C Enarson
Samina Ali
Ben Vandermeer
Robert B Wright
Terry P Klassen
Judith A Spiers
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. menarson@ualberta.ca
Source
Pediatrics. 2012 Oct;130(4):e905-12
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Attitude to Health
Child
Emergency Service, Hospital
Fear
Female
Fever - etiology - psychology - therapy
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Parents - education - psychology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Patient Satisfaction - statistics & numerical data
Professional-Family Relations
Questionnaires
Stress, Psychological
Abstract
The purpose of this survey was to study the beliefs, expectations, and satisfaction of Canadian parents regarding fever and the treatment of their febrile children.
A survey was developed exploring caregiver beliefs and treatment strategies, as well as expectations and satisfaction with medical care. Some items were modeled after previous studies to allow comparison. Caregivers with febrile children were recruited from 2005 to 2007 at 3 urgent care centers and emergency departments in Edmonton, Canada: a pediatric emergency department (n = 376), an urban urgent care center (n = 227), and a suburban urgent care clinic (n = 173).
High and rapidly rising temperature, as well as physical symptoms associated with fever, caused concern in most parents surveyed. Seventy-four percent of parents felt that the elevated temperature from fever was dangerous and 90.3% always try to treat it. Forty degrees Celsius was the most commonly sited threshold for danger. Identifying the cause (80.6%) and seriousness (87.4%) of fever were the most com-mon stressors identified. Caregivers expected to receive information about the child's illness and appropriate treatment. The parents most often wanted information about febrile seizures and the potential dangers of febrile illness. Only 16.7% of caregivers expected anti-biotics. Nearly 92% of subjects were usually satisfied with medical care.
Fever phobia continues to be a significant issue for Canadian parents. As a result, they treat fever aggressively and often seek medical attention. Good communication is important for medical staff caring for febrile children and typically leads to satisfied parents.
PubMed ID
22966028 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Better support to first-time parents of children with life-long functional disabilities. Proposal to new guidelines]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96290
Source
Lakartidningen. 2010 Jun 2-8;107(22):1477-9
Publication Type
Article

149 records – page 1 of 15.