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Adapting an attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder parent training intervention to different cultural contexts: The experience of implementing the New Forest Parenting Programme in China, Denmark, Hong Kong, Japan, and the United Kingdom.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283652
Source
Psych J. 2017 Mar;6(1):83-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Margaret J J Thompson
Alma Au
Cathy Laver-Bradbury
Anne-Mette Lange
Gail Tripp
Shizuka Shimabukuro
Jin S Zhang
Lan Shuai
Catherine E Thompson
David Daley
Edmund J Sonuga-Barke
Source
Psych J. 2017 Mar;6(1):83-97
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - nursing
Child
China
Denmark
Education, Nonprofessional - methods
Hong Kong
Humans
Japan
Parents - education
Program Development
Program Evaluation
United Kingdom
Abstract
The New Forest Parenting Programme (NFPP) is a parenting program developed for parents who have a child with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It is a manualized program that is delivered in a parent's home over 8 weeks, or in a group format, or through a self-help manual. Three randomized controlled trials have been carried out in the United Kingdom. The NFPP group has adapted the program according to feedback from parents and therapists, and for use with different populations, both within the United Kingdom and internationally. The first international trial took place in New York, United States. Trials in Denmark, Hong Kong, and Japan followed. More recently, a trial of the self-help manual has been carried out in mainland China. This paper will outline the adaptions that were needed in order to be able to deliver the program in different countries with their own expectations of parenting, culture, and language. Training had to be differently focused; manuals and handouts had to be revised, translated and back-translated; and supervision had to be delivered at a distance to maintain the fidelity of the program. The international group will outline their experience of running trials in their own countries with the NFPP in a face-to-face format (Denmark), a group format (Hong Kong and Japan), and a self-help format (mainland China).
PubMed ID
28371554 View in PubMed
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Admission criteria and diversity in medical school.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113996
Source
Med Educ. 2013 Jun;47(6):557-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Lotte O'Neill
Maria C Vonsild
Birgitta Wallstedt
Tim Dornan
Author Affiliation
Centre of Medical Education, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. lotte@medu.au.dk
Source
Med Educ. 2013 Jun;47(6):557-61
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Career Choice
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cultural Diversity
Denmark
Education, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Educational Measurement
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Male
Parents - education
Prospective Studies
School Admission Criteria
Schools, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Students, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Underachievement
Young Adult
Abstract
The under-representation in medical education of students from lower socio-economic backgrounds is an important social issue. There is currently little evidence about whether changes in admission strategies might increase the diversity of the medical student population. Denmark introduced an 'attribute-based' admission track to make it easier for students who may not be eligible for admission on the 'grade-based' track to be admitted on the basis of attributes other than academic performance. The aim of this research was to examine whether there were significant differences in the social composition of student cohorts admitted via each of the two tracks during the years 2002-2007.
This prospective cohort study included 1074 medical students admitted during 2002-2007 to the University of Southern Denmark medical school. Of these, 454 were admitted by grade-based selection and 620 were selected on attributes other than grades. To explore the social mix of candidates admitted on each of the two tracks, respectively, we obtained information on social indices associated with educational attainment in Denmark (ethnic origin, father's education, mother's education, parenthood, parents living together, parent in receipt of social benefits).
Selection strategy (grade-based or attribute-based) had no statistically significant effect on the social diversity of the medical student population.
The choice of admission criteria may not be very important to widening access and increasing social diversity in medical schools. Attracting a sufficiently diverse applicant pool may represent a better strategy for increasing diversity in the student population.
Notes
Comment In: Med Educ. 2013 Jun;47(6):542-423662869
PubMed ID
23662872 View in PubMed
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Adolescent health behavior, contentment in school, and academic achievement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91704
Source
Am J Health Behav. 2009 Jan-Feb;33(1):69-79
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kristjánsson Alfgeir Logi
Sigfúsdóttir Inga Dóra
Allegrante John P
Helgason Asgeir R
Author Affiliation
Reykjavik University, Centre for Social Research and Analysis, School of Health and Education, Reykjavik, Iceland. alfgeir@ru.is
Source
Am J Health Behav. 2009 Jan-Feb;33(1):69-79
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Anthropometry
Body mass index
Educational Status
Female
Health Behavior
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Iceland
Life Style
Male
Motor Activity
Parents - education
Personal Satisfaction
Psychometrics - methods
Questionnaires
School Health Services
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To examine the association between health behavior indicators, school contentment, and academic achievement. METHODS: Structural equation modeling with 5810 adolescents. RESULTS: Our model explained 36% of the variance in academic achievement and 24% in school contentment. BMI and sedentary lifestyle were negatively related to school contentment and academic achievement, but physical activity was positively related to school contentment and academic achievement (P
PubMed ID
18844522 View in PubMed
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Advice seeking and appropriate use of a pediatric emergency department.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220581
Source
Am J Dis Child. 1993 Aug;147(8):863-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1993
Author
T F Oberlander
I B Pless
G E Dougherty
Author Affiliation
Department of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, Children's Hospital, Boston, MA.
Source
Am J Dis Child. 1993 Aug;147(8):863-7
Date
Aug-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Algorithms
Birth Order
Child
Child, Preschool
Counseling - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Health Services Misuse - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Research
Hospitals, Pediatric - utilization
Hospitals, Teaching - utilization
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Parents - education - psychology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Quebec
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Factors
Abstract
To determine whether seeking advice prior to an unscheduled visit to a pediatric emergency department (PED) influences appropriate use of this setting for minor illnesses.
Cross-sectional questionnaire survey.
The medical emergency department of the Montreal (Quebec) Children's Hospital, a major referral and urban teaching hospital.
Four hundred eighty-nine of 562 consecutive parents visiting the PED over two periods, one in February and the other in July 1989.
None.
Parents of children between 0 and 18 years of age visiting the PED were asked whether they had previously sought advice from family, friends, or a physician. Other factors possibly related to the decision to seek care were also measured. Appropriateness was rated, blind to discharge diagnosis, by two pediatricians using a structured series of questions incorporating the child's age, time of the visit, clinical state, and problem at presentation. Thirty-four percent of visits among respondents were judged appropriate. In bivariate analysis, appropriate visits occurred significantly more often when a parent spoke to both a physician and a nonphysician (47%) prior to visiting the PED than when no advice was sought (29%; P
PubMed ID
8352220 View in PubMed
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An assessment of outcomes following parents' participation in a child abuse prevention program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature189451
Source
Violence Vict. 2002 Jun;17(3):355-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
Martine Hébert
Francine Lavoie
Nathalie Parent
Author Affiliation
Département de sexologie, Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada. hebert.m@uqam.ca
Source
Violence Vict. 2002 Jun;17(3):355-72
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Abuse - prevention & control - psychology
Child Abuse, Sexual - prevention & control - psychology
Education
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Incest - prevention & control - psychology
Male
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Parenting - psychology
Parents - education - psychology
Quebec
Self Disclosure
Self Efficacy
Sex Education
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes following participation in the ESPACE parents' workshop. A group of 55 parents who participated in the program, implemented in elementary schools in the Quebec city region, was compared to a group of 217 parents who did not attend the prevention workshop. The results revealed that attending parents suggested more adequate interventions to the vignette depicting a hypothetical situation of sexual abuse compared to nonattending parents. Attending parents are found to be more likely to suggest interventions sustaining the child in her own problem-solving process, seek help from specialized agencies, and attempt to offer emotional support to the victim. Data also reveal that the parents workshop has a positive outcome on knowledge. While the workshop is associated with beneficial outcomes, attendance rates are low. The findings are discussed in the context of identifying means to foster parent involvement in the prevention of child abuse.
PubMed ID
12102058 View in PubMed
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An efficacy study of a combined parent and teacher management training programme for children with ADHD.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129013
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2012 Apr;66(2):123-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Monica Ostberg
Ann-Margret Rydell
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Specialist Child Health Clinic, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. monica.ostberg@telia.com
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2012 Apr;66(2):123-30
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - psychology - therapy
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Behavior Therapy
Child
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Faculty
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Intervention Studies
Mental disorders
Parents - education
Psychotherapy, Group
Schools
Sweden
Abstract
Several parent training programmes and behavioural teacher training programmes built on learning theory have been developed for problem prevention and treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and/or oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) during the last few decades. Group format has often been used for parent training but single-subject designs are more common in teacher training. More studies have focussed on pre-school children than on older children, and a minority have been conducted in public mental health settings.
This study aimed to evaluate a combined parent and teacher manual-based group training programme for children with ADHD conducted by the staff at a child and adolescent psychiatric clinic in Sweden.
The intervention was a modified version of Barkley's programme. Children were randomized to an Intervention or a Control group. Sixty-one parents and 68 teachers answered questions about ADHD and ODD symptoms, and about behavioural problems when the study started and at a 3-month follow-up.
RESULTS showed that the intervention resulted in a reduction of the number of children who met DSM-IV criteria for ADHD and/or ODD. Effects were more pronounced in the home setting than in the school setting, and were further accentuated when both parents and teachers of the same child took part in the intervention. Teachers with more problematic classroom situations benefited most from the intervention.
The programme, "Strategies in Everyday Life", has, in a regular clinical setting, demonstrated promising effects on children's disruptive behaviour, and a clinical implication was to recommend involving both parents and teachers in the programme.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22150634 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of training in motivational interviewing for nurses in child health services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124046
Source
Behav Cogn Psychother. 2013 May;41(3):329-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Benjamin Bohman
Lars Forsberg
Ata Ghaderi
Finn Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Behav Cogn Psychother. 2013 May;41(3):329-43
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child Health Services
Child, Preschool
Clinical Competence
Cross-Sectional Studies
Curriculum
Education
Exercise
Female
Food Habits
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Motivational Interviewing
Obesity - epidemiology - nursing - prevention & control - psychology
Parents - education - psychology
Pediatric Nursing - education
Sweden
Abstract
Acquiring proficiency in motivational interviewing (MI) may be more difficult than generally believed, and training research suggests that the standard one-time workshop format may be insufficient. Although nurses represent one of the professions that have received most training in MI, training in this group has rarely been systematically evaluated using objective behavioral measures.
To evaluate an enhanced MI training program, comprising a 3.5-day workshop, systematic feedback on MI performance, and four sessions of supervision on practice samples.
Nurses (n = 36) in Swedish child health services were trained in MI. Skillfulness in MI was assessed using the Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity (MITI) Code. Effects of training were compared to beginning proficiency thresholds.
Participants did not reach beginning proficiency thresholds on any of the indicators of proficiency and effect sizes were small.
The present study adds to a growing body of literature suggesting that the current standard MI training format may not provide practitioners with enough skillfulness. Moreover, the results indicate that even enhanced training, including systematic feedback and supervision, may not be sufficient. Suggestions for improved MI training are made.
PubMed ID
22632171 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Arch Pediatr. 1999;6 Suppl 2:267s-268s
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
D. Mai
K. Borch
G. Greisen
Author Affiliation
Unité de néonatologie, Rigshospitalet, Copenhague, Danemark.
Source
Arch Pediatr. 1999;6 Suppl 2:267s-268s
Date
1999
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Denmark
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Parents - education
Patient Discharge
PubMed ID
10370503 View in PubMed
Less detail

364 records – page 1 of 37.