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Parental rearing patterns and suicidal thoughts

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102043
Source
Acta psychiatrica Scandinavica. 1983 Jun;67(6):429-433
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1983
Author
Ross, MW
Clayer, JR
Campbell, RL
Source
Acta psychiatrica Scandinavica. 1983 Jun;67(6):429-433
Date
Jun-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Child rearing patterns
Parental rearing patterns
Parental separation
Parents
Suicidal ideation
Suicidal thoughts
Suicide
Abstract
In an attempt to investigate the parental rearing patterns associated with presence of suicidal thoughts, a measure of child rearing patterns (EMBU) and the EPQ measure of personality dimensions were administered to 85 university students, 72 medical and surgical patients, and 125 employees of a state department, along with two questions tapping suicidal thoughts. Results indicated that those with suicidal ideation had parents who had separated more often than controls, and that parental rearing of those with suicidal thoughts included parents who favoured siblings rather than subject, were unstimulating, guilt-engendering, rejecting and unaffectionate. Fathers were more abusive and punitive. These findings suggest that suicidal thoughts may be related to rejection and lack of self-esteem, and that therapy which focuses on resolving parental rejection may be of some use in patients with suicidal ideation.
Less detail

Psychological control in daily parent-child interactions increases children's negative emotions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113249
Source
J Fam Psychol. 2013 Jun;27(3):453-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Kaisa Aunola
Asko Tolvanen
Jaana Viljaranta
Jari-Erik Nurmi
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä, Finland. kaisa.aunola@jyu.fi
Source
J Fam Psychol. 2013 Jun;27(3):453-62
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Emotions - physiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting - psychology
Parents - psychology
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to investigate the temporal dynamics between parental behaviors in daily interactions with their offspring, that is, affection and psychological control, and children's negative emotions. The participants were 152 Finnish families with a 6- to 7-year-old child. Children's negative emotions and parental affection and psychological control in interactions with their child were measured daily using diary questionnaires filled in by the mothers and fathers over 7 successive days. The results of multilevel modeling showed that psychological control applied by mothers and fathers in daily interactions with their child leads to an increase in negative emotions in the child. Parental affection in daily interactions with their child was not associated with the child's negative emotions.
PubMed ID
23750527 View in PubMed
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The relationship between resiliency and parental alienation syndrome : a study of young adults from divorced versus non-divorced families

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293544
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2009
Author
Hutchinson, Elaine F
Date
2009
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Parental alienation syndrome -- Case studies -- Alaska
Parent and child
Parent and adult child -- Case studies -- Alaska
Notes
RJ 506.P27 H88 2009
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A Norwegian validity study of parenting stress measured by the Nijmegen Child-Rearing Situation Questionnaire section one.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149017
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2010 Mar;24(1):183-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
May-Britt Solem
Knut-Andreas Christophersen
Paul Wels
Author Affiliation
Oslo University College, Faculty of Social Science, Oslo, Norway. may-britt.solem@sam.hio.no
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2010 Mar;24(1):183-93
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting
Parents - psychology
Questionnaires
Stress, Psychological - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to explore the construct validity and reliability of the Nijmegen Child-Rearing Situation Questionnaire (NCSQ) section one entitled 'Subjective parenting stress'. This is composed of subscales measuring relational and situational stress. The possibility of using subscales with both dimensions in the same study gives the opportunity to explore parenting stress from both a relational and situational perspective. The NCSQ was administered to parents of two groups of boys, 6-12 years old. The clinical group consisted of 64 parents of children reporting behaviour problems who were recruited from seven child and adolescent clinical psychiatric units. A group of 128 parents of children reporting no specific behavioural problems were recruited from 12 schools. Six boys in each class grades 1-7 were randomly selected from the class rosters. Both samples were recruited from Oslo and surrounding eastern counties. The suggested factor structure of the construct parenting stress was tested with data from both groups. First, a separate confirmatory analysis of the items in each factor was tested. Then testing was carried out with one- and two-factor analysis using the sum scores from each subscale, to further explore whether parenting stress was a one-dimensional general or a two-dimensional construct. Results showed an unacceptable model fit of the pleasure subscale in the clinical group. The instrument is not relevant for normal populations due to the skewed responses found in the acceptance and pleasure subscales, the low internal reliability found in the acceptance and relation subscales, and the unacceptable factor loading and model fit found for the managing subscale in the comparison group. Further studies are needed to test the construct validity and reliability of the scale. Although the instrument is intended for clinical populations, hopefully with further revisions and research, it might be used as a clinical tool to define dimensions of parenting stress in everyday life.
PubMed ID
19694985 View in PubMed
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Families First: the development of a new mentalization-based group intervention for first-time parents to promote child development and family health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276686
Source
Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Jan;17(1):3-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Mirjam Kalland
Åse Fagerlund
Malin von Koskull
Marjaterttu Pajulo
Source
Prim Health Care Res Dev. 2016 Jan;17(1):3-17
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child Development
Family Health
Finland
Humans
Infant
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting - psychology
Parents - psychology
Program Evaluation
Theory of Mind
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to describe the development of Families First, a new mentalization-based group intervention model for supporting early parenthood. The general aim of the intervention was to support well-functioning models of parenting and prevent transmission of negative parenting models over generations, and thus promote child development and overall family health.
In the Finnish society, great concern has aroused during the last decade regarding the well-being and mental health of children and adolescents. Increased number of divorces, poverty, substance abuse, and mental health problems among parents enhance the risk for child neglect and abuse. New effective, preventive, and health-promoting intervention tools are greatly needed to support families with young children. At present, the Families First intervention is being implemented in primary social and healthcare units all over Finland.
This article will provide a theoretical understanding of the importance of parental mentalization for the development of the parent-child relationship and the development of the child as well as proposed mechanisms of actions in order to enhance mentalizing capacity. The cultural context will be described. The article will also provide a description of the scientific evaluation protocol of the intervention model. Finally, possible limitations and challenges of the intervention model are discussed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25827136 View in PubMed
Less detail

Improved parenting maintained four years following a brief parent training intervention in a non-clinical sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279595
Source
BMC Psychol. 2016 Aug 24;4(1):43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-24-2016
Author
Charlotte Reedtz
Sihu Klest
Source
BMC Psychol. 2016 Aug 24;4(1):43
Date
Aug-24-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Education, Nonprofessional
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Norway
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting
Parents - education
Program Evaluation
Abstract
The aim of the present study is to evaluate whether the effects of a short, six session version of an evidence-based parent training programme (The Incredible Years), delivered in a non-clinical community sample in the northern Norway, are maintained 4 years following the initial intervention.
Data were collected primarily from mothers in a randomized controlled trial (N?=?117). Children's mean age at 4 year follow-up was 7.5 years.
A mixed model analyses of linear change with a time by condition interaction revealed that statistically significant differences were maintained between the parent training and control groups for several outcomes. The parent training group showed a reduction in harsh disciple and an increase of both self-reported positive parenting and parental efficacy when compared to the control group who received services as usual. No significant differences between the two groups were found for child behaviour problems as measured by the ECBI Intensity scale. In addition, mixed model analyses of quadratic change were conducted to test the differences in the trajectory of change over four time points. There were significant differences in the trajectory of change for (1) the ECBI with the parent training group showing an immediate drop in the intensity of problem behaviour and (2) the positive parenting scale showing an immediate steep increase; no other significant differences in trajectory were detected.
Families from a non-clinical sample who participated in a brief version of the Incredible Years Basic parent training programme maintained changes in positive parenting, harsh discipline, and parental efficacy 4 years after completion of the intervention.
ClinicalTrials. gov NCT02850510 . Retrospectively registered 29 July 2016.
PubMed ID
27553950 View in PubMed
Less detail

Organizing allergy and being a 'good' parent: parents' narratives about their children's emerging problems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89954
Source
Health (London). 2009 Mar;13(2):157-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Gunnarsson Nina
Hydén Lars-Christer
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Sweden. nina.gunnarsson@ki.se
Source
Health (London). 2009 Mar;13(2):157-74
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Female
Food Hypersensitivity - diagnosis - physiopathology - prevention & control
Humans
Hypersensitivity - diagnosis
Male
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting - psychology
Parents - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The article focuses on the early and problem-solving phases of the child's illness trajectory and on how child allergies are constructed and organized by the parents in a moral everyday context. The parents' narratives were reconstructed as narratives, describing the pathways parents take before they decide to seek professional medical aid as well as showing how they construct themselves as responsible parents. Before consulting health professionals the parents have often tried a range of different ways to define, control and manage their children's various problems. Allergy problems were interpreted and responded to differently, depending on the way they emerged in everyday life. Acute reactions quickly led to an illness definition and a diagnosis. Gradual and diffuse problems were not so easily defined. They were at first interpreted and responded to as normal infant problems, but, through the parents' readiness and various situational and temporal clues, they were organized as symptoms of illness. Parents seek medical aid when their own strategies fail or do not fully work, but their decisions are also formed within a pre-problem context of their moral accountability as parents.
PubMed ID
19228826 View in PubMed
Less detail

Open your heart and your home - be a foster parent.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245509
Source
AARN News Lett. 1980 Sep;36(8):12-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1980
Source
AARN News Lett. 1980 Sep;36(8):12-3
Date
Sep-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Child
Foster Home Care
Humans
Parent-Child Relations
Parents - education
PubMed ID
6902628 View in PubMed
Less detail

Health care settings as resources for parenting information.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217077
Source
Pediatr Nurs. 1994 Nov-Dec;20(6):560-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
J E Koepke
Source
Pediatr Nurs. 1994 Nov-Dec;20(6):560-3
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Family Practice
Humans
Office Visits
Parenting
Parents - education
Questionnaires
Abstract
In research designed to investigate and develop health care settings as resources for parenting information, 82 physicians' waiting rooms were surveyed. Less than a third of the waiting rooms surveyed provided any parenting information, but a majority of physicians agreed to display parenting pamphlets for a trial period. All found them useful to their patients, wanted more, and are continuing to display them on an ongoing basis. Providing parenting information like this is a simple intervention in aid of families that nurses could initiate in a variety of health care settings.
PubMed ID
7708455 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Parents should have better everyday contact with children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40916
Source
Vardfacket. 1980 Oct 23;4(19):60-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-23-1980
Author
J. Thomasson
Source
Vardfacket. 1980 Oct 23;4(19):60-1
Date
Oct-23-1980
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Child
Female
Humans
Male
Parent-Child Relations
Parents - education
Sweden
PubMed ID
6905601 View in PubMed
Less detail

4061 records – page 1 of 407.