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137 records – page 1 of 14.

1st European Congress on Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, Stockholm, Sweden, September 2-5, 1979.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62432
Source
Acta Chir Scand Suppl. 1980;498:1-160
Publication Type
Article
Date
1980
Source
Acta Chir Scand Suppl. 1980;498:1-160
Date
1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Humans
Metabolism
Nutrition
Parenteral Nutrition
Parenteral Nutrition, Total
PubMed ID
6776724 View in PubMed
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1st European Congress on Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition. Stockholm, Sweden. September 2--5, 1979.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62440
Source
JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 1979 Jul-Aug;3(4):289-316
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Source
JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 1979 Jul-Aug;3(4):289-316
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Congresses
Enteral Nutrition
Europe
Humans
Metabolism
Nutrition
Parenteral Nutrition
Sweden
PubMed ID
39184 View in PubMed
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21st Congress of the European Society of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition. Stockholm, Sweden, September 5-8, 1999. Abstracts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61789
Source
Clin Nutr. 1999 Aug;18 Suppl 1:1-64
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Aug-1999
Source
Clin Nutr. 1999 Aug;18 Suppl 1:1-64
Date
Aug-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Animals
Enteral Nutrition
Humans
Metabolism
Parenteral Nutrition
PubMed ID
10906947 View in PubMed
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[Administration of glutamine and its dipeptides in parenteral nutrition. Which patients are candidates?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61898
Source
Nutr Hosp. 1998 Jan-Feb;13(1):8-20
Publication Type
Article
Author
D. Cardona Pera
Author Affiliation
Servicio de Farmacia, Hospital de la Sta. Creu i S. Pau, Barcelona, España.
Source
Nutr Hosp. 1998 Jan-Feb;13(1):8-20
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Comparative Study
Controlled Clinical Trials
Dipeptides - administration & dosage - pharmacokinetics
English Abstract
Glutamine - administration & dosage - metabolism
Humans
Parenteral Nutrition
Postoperative Care
Abstract
Despite the fact that glutamine is not considered to be an essential amino acid, it is the amino acid found in the greatest concentration both in plasma (26%) as in skeletal muscle (75%). These levels may decrease in post-operative, trauma, or critical patients. Glutamine performs many functions in which its demand may be increased, such as: it is a precursor of the synthesis of nucleotides; it is an activator of the protein synthesis and at the same time it inhibits the degradation; it is an activator of glycogen synthesis; it is a metabolic substrate for rapidly replicating cells; it is an energy source for the enterocyte which is so important for maintaining the integrity and the function of the intestinal barrier, and the consumption thereof may be increased under conditions of stress. The administration of glutamine intravenously leads to two physical-chemical problems; the first is its low solubility in water; at 20 degrees C this is only 36 g/l, and the second problem is its low chemical stability in an aqueous solution at 22-24 degrees C, this being 11 days. This problem has led the industry to research two dipeptides of glutamine; L-alanyl-glutamine, and L-glycyl L-glutamine, both of which are much more soluble and much more stable. At present there is still a controversy regarding the dosage of glutamine and its dipeptides, with the dose being 0.19-0.29 g/kg/day of L-glutamine or its dipeptide forms, in surgical post-operative periods or to prevent bacterial translocation, and in patients who are candidates for bone marrow transplants, the administered dose has been 0.37-0.57 g/kg/day. The purpose of this study is to review the existing bibliography regarding the efficacy of L-glutamine or its dipeptides in four possible indications for its application in the daily clinical practice, such as: a) In post-operative surgical patients of major or medium surgery, glutamine or its dipeptides reduces the losses of muscular glutamine and its catabolism, showing a less negative nitrogen balance. b) Whether it avoids bacterial translocation. c) Whether it favors the response of the immunological system. d) Whether in patients who are candidates for bone marrow transplants this decreases the side effects due to chemotherapy and radiotherapy such as mucositis, or whether it decreases the number of days of neutrophil recovery. At present, on the European market there are two commercially available brands of glutamine dipeptides: Dipeptiven, by Fresenius Laboratories, Germany. A 100 ml vial which corresponds to 20 g of L-alanyl L-glutamine (8.2 g of alanine + 13.46 g of L-glutamine). This is added to the standard amino acid solution. Glamin, Pharmacia and Upjohn Laboratory, Sweden. This is an amino acid solution with 13.4% essential and non-essential amino acids which are equivalent to 22.4 g of nitrogen/l, and which contain 30.27 g L-glycyl-L-glutamine (10.27 g of glycine + 20 g of L-glutamine).
PubMed ID
9578682 View in PubMed
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Adult patients receiving home parenteral nutrition in Denmark from 1991 to 1996: who will benefit from intestinal transplantation?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21447
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1998 Aug;33(8):839-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1998
Author
P B Jeppesen
M. Staun
P B Mortensen
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Medicine CA, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1998 Aug;33(8):839-46
Date
Aug-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Catheters, Indwelling - adverse effects
Cause of Death
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - mortality - therapy
Humans
Incidence
Intestine, Small - transplantation
Male
Middle Aged
Parenteral Nutrition, Home - mortality
Prevalence
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Small-bowel transplantation is an alternative to home parenteral nutrition (HPN) in patients with gut failure. Our aim was to report the indication, diagnosis, morbidity, mortality, and intestinal adaptation in the total cohort of Danish patients receiving HPN at any time during the 5 years between 1 January 1991 and 31 December 1995. The data were analysed against the option of transplantation. RESULTS: HPN was given to 129 patients; 59 (46%) had inflammatory bowel disease (15% died), 26 (20%) had cured cancers (42% died), and 44 (34%) had other diseases (dysmotility, surgical complications, infarcts, and so forth; 27% died). Of these, 60% were new in the HPN program, but only 19% received HPN all 5 years; 31 % had terminated HPN, 19% permanently, and 25% died. Only four deaths were HPN-related. In December 1995, 73 patients were receiving HPN in Denmark, for a prevalence of 13.9 per million, which is the highest in Europe but 10-fold lower than in the United States. CONCLUSIONS: Gut failure was the only indication for HPN in Denmark. Weight loss without gut failure, such as disseminated cancer and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, was not an indication for HPN. Survival after small-bowel transplantation should be assessed against a sizeable mortality among candidates receiving HPN, and this depends on diagnosis and age. In an HPN population comparable with the Danish, a quarter is likely to die within a period of 5 years, a quarter will terminate HPN, and the others survive with HPN. Small-bowel transplantation can be a lifesaving procedure in the small fraction of foreseeable HPN-related deaths, mainly caused by liver failure. Transplantation will not improve survival in most adult HPN patients, and only an improved quality of life after transplantation justifies this procedure in most HPN patients.
PubMed ID
9754732 View in PubMed
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Aluminum contamination of parenteral nutrition additives, amino acid solutions, and lipid emulsions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33185
Source
Nutrition. 1999 Sep;15(9):683-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
K. Popinska
J. Kierkus
M. Lyszkowska
J. Socha
E. Pietraszek
W. Kmiotek
J. Ksiazyk
Author Affiliation
Children's Memorial Health Institute, Department of Gastroenterology and Nutrition, Warsaw, Poland.
Source
Nutrition. 1999 Sep;15(9):683-6
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aluminum - analysis
Amino acids
Drug Contamination
Fat Emulsions, Intravenous - analysis
Humans
Parenteral Nutrition
Pediatrics
Solutions - analysis
Spectrophotometry, Atomic
Abstract
Contamination of parenteral nutrition solutions with aluminum may result in accumulation of this element in bones and, in premature infants, may inhibit bone calcium uptake and induce cholestasis. We measured the aluminum concentration of small-volume parenterals, amino acid solutions, lipid emulsions, and special solutions containing glucose, amino acids, electrolytes, and trace elements (standard I for children with a body weight of 3-5 kg, standard II for children with a body weight of 5-10 kg). The method used was graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry GTA-AAS (SpectrAA-400 Plus, Varian, PtY Ltd., Mulgrave, Australia). Quality control was run with the use of control serum (Seronorm, Nycomed, Oslo, Norway). The aluminum contents of parenterally administered solutions were: pediatric trace elements, 130 micrograms/L, and pediatric trace elements, 3000 micrograms/L; phosphorus salts: K-phosphates, 9800 micrograms/L, and Na/K phosphates, 13,000 micrograms/L; 10% calcium gluconate, 4400 micrograms/L; 6.5% amino acids, 30 micrograms/L; 10% amino acids, 120 micrograms/L; 12.5% amino acids, 121 micrograms/L; 20% lipid emulsion, 30 micrograms/L; 20% lipid emulsion, 180 micrograms/L; water-soluble vitamins, 12 micrograms/L; lipid soluble vitamins, 360 micrograms/L; standard I, 55 micrograms/L; standard II, 90 micrograms/L; The aluminum intake from parenteral nutrition was 6.6-10.8 micrograms.kg-1.d-1--a dose exceeding the safety limit of 2 micrograms.kg-1.d-1. The possible association of aluminum not only with metabolic bone disease, but also with encephalopathy, dictates caution when dealing with the pediatric population on long-term parenteral nutrition. In the absence of reliable label information, it seems proper to monitor the aluminum concentration in parenteral nutrition products and to report it in professional journals.
Notes
Comment In: Nutrition. 1999 Sep;15(9):71510467617
PubMed ID
10467613 View in PubMed
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Anaerobic infections in children with neurological impairments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215267
Source
Am J Ment Retard. 1995 May;99(6):579-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1995
Author
I. Brook
Author Affiliation
Georgetown University School of Medicine, USA.
Source
Am J Ment Retard. 1995 May;99(6):579-94
Date
May-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacteria, Anaerobic - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Brain Diseases - complications - etiology
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Gastrointestinal Diseases - etiology - microbiology - surgery
Gastrostomy
Humans
Immune System - physiology
Infant
Lung Diseases - microbiology
Osteomyelitis - etiology
Otitis Media with Effusion - diagnosis - microbiology
Parenteral Nutrition
Pressure Ulcer - complications - diagnosis - microbiology
Abstract
Children with neurological impairments are prone to develop serious infection due to anaerobic bacteria. They often are predisposed to develop infections caused by their own indigenous bacterial flora caused by impairments of their mechanical and immunological defenses, the change in their oral flora due to poor hygiene, and the delay in recognition of acute infection. The most common anaerobic infections are decubitus ulcers, gastrectomy site wound infections, pulmonary infections (aspiration pneumonia, lung abscesses, and tracheitis), and chronic suppurative otitis media. The unique microbiology of each of the infections and their medical and surgical management were discussed in this review.
PubMed ID
7632426 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of diarrhea-associated childhood hemolytic uremic syndrome: the Walkerton epidemic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152887
Source
Kidney Int Suppl. 2009 Feb;(112):S35-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Douglas G Matsell
Colin T White
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology, British Columbia Children's Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. dmastsell@cw.bc.ca
Source
Kidney Int Suppl. 2009 Feb;(112):S35-7
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Combined Modality Therapy
Diarrhea - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology - therapy
Disease Outbreaks
Erythrocyte Transfusion
Escherichia coli Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology - therapy
Escherichia coli O157 - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Female
Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology - therapy
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Manure - microbiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Parenteral Nutrition, Total
Peritoneal dialysis
Platelet Transfusion
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Water Microbiology
Water Purification
Water supply
Abstract
In Canada, the majority of cases of childhood hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) are associated with a diarrheal illness (D+) due to verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli (VTEC). Although the ingestion of undercooked beef is an important cause, we report on the largest outbreak of E. coli illness due to a contaminated supply of municipal water. We describe the clinical features and short-term outcomes of 22 children who simultaneously developed D+HUS.
PubMed ID
19180130 View in PubMed
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[A parametric description of the parenteral nutrition protocols of 19 American hospitals].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231983
Source
Nutr Hosp. 1989 Jan-Mar;4(1):23-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
E. Martí-Bonmatí
P. Cervera
A. Mínguez
M D Pérez-Serrano
Source
Nutr Hosp. 1989 Jan-Mar;4(1):23-30
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Protocols
Humans
Medical Records
Parenteral Nutrition - methods - statistics & numerical data
United States
Abstract
In the preparation of a centralized parenteral nutrition unit project in our hospital, following the creation of a multi-disciplinary commission entrusted with the study of this project, we proceeded to evaluate parenteral nutrition protocols of national and foreign hospitals, as a first approach to the subject. This study evaluates and extracts the data we consider most relevant in a sample of 19 American hospitals. With regard to the types of parenteral diet, we observed that most of them (63%) had "standard diets", mainly formulated with 25% glucose and 4.25% crystalline amino acids. None of the protocols studied contained alternatives to glucose as a calorie-contributor, nor were there special formulae for amino acids, although many of them included it in their therapies for use if considered necessary. In all protocols, the contribution of fats was reduced to concrete situations and administered in a different way to the rest of the food in 73% of cases. With regard to additives, despite the existence of standard formulations of electrolytes and vitamins and oligoelements, in 100% of the hospitals studied, there was the possibility of formulating each element separately. Administration was done in several doses per day in 42% of cases and in 100%, using perfusion pumps. The data obtained from this review was of great value in preparing our own parenteral nutrition protocols.
PubMed ID
2485337 View in PubMed
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[A report from the National Board of Health and Welfare: nutrition therapy must be in the same category as medical treatment]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61720
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Oct 24;98(43):4724-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-24-2001
Author
T. Mossberg
Author Affiliation
torsten.mossberg@sos.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Oct 24;98(43):4724-5
Date
Oct-24-2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Nutrition Disorders - diagnosis - prevention & control - therapy
Parenteral Nutrition - standards
Practice Guidelines
Sweden
PubMed ID
11715250 View in PubMed
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137 records – page 1 of 14.