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Attitudes of program directors toward women in pediatric dentistry training programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224288
Source
Pediatr Dent. 1992 Mar-Apr;14(2):105-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
N S Seale
W F Waggoner
Author Affiliation
Baylor College of Dentistry, Dallas, TX.
Source
Pediatr Dent. 1992 Mar-Apr;14(2):105-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel - psychology
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Dentists, Women - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Education, Dental, Graduate - statistics & numerical data
Faculty, Dental
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency
Male
Parental Leave
Pediatric Dentistry - education - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
United States
Abstract
The number of women entering pediatric dentistry graduate programs is increasing. A formal survey was conducted in the fall of 1990 to determine what impact, if any, this increase is having on the programs. The survey sample consisted of the 57 pediatric dentistry graduate program directors from the United States and Canada. The survey form included program data about gender distribution in the current and previous classes, and female faculty distribution within the programs. The survey requested information about the attitudes of various groups of individuals who interacted with the residents relative to the gender of the resident and again, relative to whether the resident was pregnant. Inquiry was made concerning maternity leave policies and selected treatment scenarios involving pregnant residents. Finally, questions were asked about motivational factors, personal priorities, and policy change for female vs. male residents. Fifty forms were returned for a return rate of 88%. The 48 forms analyzed revealed that 52% of current classes are female and 51% of applicants for 1991 were female. Women comprise 23% of full-time and 26% of part-time faculty. There was no single issue perceived by program directors as a group to be a significant concern or problem relating to gender. Program directors would consider removing pregnant females from contact with combative patients (83%) and environmental hazards (85%), but fewer would consider removing them from contact with for HIV+ or Hb+ patients.
PubMed ID
1386924 View in PubMed
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[Backache during pregnancy can be relieved by exercise]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50246
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 May 20;89(21):1886-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-1992

[Beneficial effect of maternity leave on delivery].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190777
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Jan-Feb;93(1):72-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Qian Xu
Louise Séguin
Lise Goulet
Author Affiliation
Département de médecine sociale et préventive, Groupe de Recherche Interdisciplinaire en Santé, Faculté de Médecine, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, succ. Centre-ville, Montréal, Québec H3C 3J7. qian.xu@umontreal.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Jan-Feb;93(1):72-7
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Delivery, Obstetric
Female
Humans
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Parental Leave
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Prenatal Care
Quebec
Women, Working
Abstract
To identify the contribution of the duration of the prenatal maternity leave on term delivery.
Characteristics of the prenatal maternity leave and delivery among 363 working women who had delivered a full-term infant at 1 of 4 hospitals in Montreal during 1996 were studied.
The presence of an intervention or complication during delivery was observed in 68.9% of the participants. The average duration of the prenatal maternity leave was about 8 weeks (SD = 7). The adjusted risk of a difficult delivery decreased significantly with the duration of the prenatal maternity leave (OR = 0.96; 95% CI: 0.93-0.99).
The duration of the maternity leave before delivery is associated with an easier term delivery for working women.
PubMed ID
11925706 View in PubMed
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[Benefits when children are ill--more trouble than support?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121818
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2012 Aug 7;132(14):1633-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-7-2012
Author
Sissel Berg Haveraaen
Trond H Diseth
Author Affiliation
Seksjon for psykosomatikk og CL-barnepsykiatri, Barneavdeling for nevrofag, Kvinne- og barneklinikken, Oslo universitetssykehus, Rikshospitalet, Norway. sissel.berg.haveraaen@ous-hf.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2012 Aug 7;132(14):1633-6
Date
Aug-7-2012
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Care - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
Chronic Disease - economics
Disabled Children - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Insurance, Health - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
Norway
Parental Leave - economics - legislation & jurisprudence
PubMed ID
22875133 View in PubMed
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Breastfeeding and maternal employment: two rights don't make a wrong.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58934
Source
Lancet. 1998 Oct 3;352(9134):1083-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-3-1998
Author
E. Frank
Author Affiliation
Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30303, USA.
Source
Lancet. 1998 Oct 3;352(9134):1083-4
Date
Oct-3-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Feeding - statistics & numerical data
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Infant
Norway
Parental Leave - economics - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
United States
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 1998 Nov 21;352(9141):17049853461
PubMed ID
9798580 View in PubMed
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A comparative analysis of early child health and development services and outcomes in countries with different redistributive policies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106312
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:1049
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Meta van den Heuvel
Jessica Hopkins
Anne Biscaro
Cinntha Srikanthan
Andrea Feller
Sven Bremberg
Nienke Verkuijl
Boudien Flapper
Elizabeth Lee Ford-Jones
Robin Williams
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Hospital for Sick Children and the University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. m.van.den.heuvel@umcg.nl.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:1049
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child care
Child Development
Child Health Services
Child Welfare
Cross-Sectional Studies
Cuba - epidemiology
Humans
Netherlands - epidemiology
Parental Leave
Prenatal Care
Public Policy
Social Determinants of Health - statistics & numerical data
Social Welfare
Sweden - epidemiology
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
The social environment is a fundamental determinant of early child development and, in turn, early child development is a determinant of health, well-being, and learning skills across the life course. Redistributive policies aimed at reducing social inequalities, such as a welfare state and labour market policies, have shown a positive association with selected health indicators. In this study, we investigated the influence of redistributive policies specifically on the social environment of early child development in five countries with different political traditions. The objective of this analysis was to highlight similarities and differences in social and health services between the countries and their associations with other health outcomes that can inform better global early child development policies and improve early child health and development.
Four social determinants of early child development were selected to provide a cross-section of key time periods in a child's life from prenatal to kindergarten. They included: 1) prenatal care, 2) maternal leave, 3) child health care, and 4) child care and early childhood education. We searched international databases and reports (e.g. Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, World Bank, and UNICEF) to obtain information about early child development policies, services and outcomes.
Although a comparative analysis cannot claim causation, our analysis suggests that redistributive policies aimed at reducing social inequalities are associated with a positive influence on the social determinants of early child development. Generous redistributive policies are associated with a higher maternal leave allowance and pay and more preventive child healthcare visits. A decreasing trend in infant mortality, low birth weight rate, and under five mortality rate were observed with an increase in redistributive policies. No clear influence of redistributive policies was observed on breastfeeding and immunization rates. In the analysis of child care and early education, the lack of uniform measures of early child development outcomes was apparent.
This paper provides further support for an association between redistributive policies and early child health and development outcomes, along with the organization of early child health and development services.
PubMed ID
24195544 View in PubMed
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Could gender equality in parental leave harm off-springs' mental health? A registry study of the Swedish parental/child cohort of 1988/89.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125658
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2012;11:19
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Lisa Norström
Lene Lindberg
Anna Månsdotter
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Int J Equity Health. 2012;11:19
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - complications - drug therapy
Child of Impaired Parents - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Cohort Studies
Depressive Disorder - complications - drug therapy
Family Characteristics
Fathers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology
Mothers - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Parent-Child Relations
Parental Leave - economics - standards - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Prejudice
Registries
Sex Factors
Social Class
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Mental ill-health among children and young adults is a growing public health problem and research into causes involves consideration of family life and gender practice. This study aimed at exploring the association between parents' degree of gender equality in childcare and children's mental ill-health.
The population consisted of Swedish parents and their firstborn child in 1988-1989 (N = 118 595 family units) and the statistical method was multiple logistic regression. Gender equality of childcare was indicated by the division of parental leave (1988-1990), and child mental ill-health was indicated by outpatient mental care (2001-2006) and drug prescription (2005-2008), for anxiety and depression.
The overall finding was that boys with gender traditional parents (mother dominance in childcare) have lower risk of depression measured by outpatient mental care than boys with gender-equal parents, while girls with gender traditional and gender untraditional parents (father dominance in childcare) have lower risk of anxiety measured by drug prescription than girls with gender-equal parents.
This study suggests that unequal parenting regarding early childcare, whether traditional or untraditional, is more beneficial for offspring's mental health than equal parenting. However, further research is required to confirm our findings and to explore the pathways through which increased gender equality may influence child health.
Notes
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Cites: Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1995 May;52(5):374-837726718
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Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2006 Jul;60(7):616-2016790834
Cites: J Pers Assess. 2006 Aug;87(1):95-10116856790
Cites: Br J Sociol. 2006 Dec;57(4):597-61717168940
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Cites: Pediatrics. 2011 Jun;127(6):e1414-2721624878
Cites: J Public Health Policy. 2012 Feb;33(1):105-1821918577
Cites: Br J Psychiatry. 2000 Dec;177:486-9211102321
Cites: Gend Dev. 1997 Jun;5(2):31-4012292613
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 2002 Jul;159(7):1133-4512091191
Cites: J Adolesc. 2003 Feb;26(1):63-7812550822
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Cites: Am Sociol Rev. 1983 Apr;48(2):174-876859677
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2004;32(6):450-515762030
PubMed ID
22463683 View in PubMed
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[Daily number of births in Norway 1989-93. Variations across months, day of week, phase of the moon and changes in leave entitlements]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34322
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Mar 20;117(8):1098-101
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-1997
Author
E. Ytterstad
T. Brenn
Author Affiliation
Institutt for matematiske realfag.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Mar 20;117(8):1098-101
Date
Mar-20-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth rate
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Parental Leave
Seasons
Abstract
The variation in the daily numbers of births across month, day of week, phase of the moon and maternity leave entitlements have been studied for all births in Norway between 1989 and 1993, a total of 302,209 newborn children. The number of births was highest in the spring and lowest in November and December. A secondary birth maximum was observed in September, possibly related to activities during Christmas and New Year celebrations nine months before. Furthermore, births were least numerous at weekends and were concentrated in the middle of the week. This pattern probably reflects less active obstetric intervention at weekends. The number of births does not seem to vary with phase of the moon. At the time of the latest, and largest increase in national birth maternity leave entitlements, fewer births occurred in the days before and correspondingly more births in the days immediately after the date when the change came into force.
PubMed ID
9148477 View in PubMed
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Dangerous dads? Ecological and longitudinal analyses of paternity leave and risk for child injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127989
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2012 Nov;66(11):1001-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Lucie Laflamme
Anna Månsdotter
Michael Lundberg
Cecilia Magnusson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Global Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. lucie.laflamme@ki.se
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2012 Nov;66(11):1001-4
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child care
Child, Preschool
Fathers
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mothers
Parental Leave
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
In 1974, Sweden became the first country to permit fathers to take paid parental leave. Other countries are currently following suit issuing similar laws. While this reform supports the principles of the United Nations convention of the right for children to be with both parents and enshrines the ethos of gender equality, there has been little systematic examination of its potential impact on child health. Instead, there is uninformed debate that fathers may expose their children to greater risks of injury than mothers. In this Swedish national study, the authors therefore assess whether fathers' parental leave can be regarded as a more serious risk factor for child injuries than that of mothers.
Nationwide register-based ecological and longitudinal studies of hospitalisation due to injury (and intoxication) in early childhood, involving the Swedish population in 1973-2009 (ecological design), and children born in 1988 and 1989 (n=118?278) (longitudinal design).
An increase in fathers' share of parental leave over time was parallelled by a downward trend in child injury rates (age 0-4 years). At the individual level, the crude incidence of child injury (age 0-2 years) was lower during paternity as compared with maternity leave. This association was, however, explained by parental socio-demographic characteristics (multivariate HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.74 to 1.2).
There is no support for the notion that paternity leave increases the risk of child injury.
PubMed ID
22245721 View in PubMed
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[Danish nurses in line for permission]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59381
Source
J Sykepleien. 1994 Jul 5;82(12):14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-5-1994
Author
O M Larsen
Source
J Sykepleien. 1994 Jul 5;82(12):14
Date
Jul-5-1994
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Nurses - supply & distribution
Parental Leave
PubMed ID
7826759 View in PubMed
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78 records – page 1 of 8.