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Alcohol and drug screening of newborns: would women consent?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150543
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2009 Apr;31(4):331-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Matthew Hicks
Suzanne C Tough
Shahirose Premji
Karen Benzies
Andrew W Lyon
Ian Mitchell
Reg Sauve
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary and Calgary Health Region, Calgary AB, Canada.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2009 Apr;31(4):331-9
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Maternal-Fetal Exchange
Neonatal Screening
Parental Consent
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Substance Abuse Detection
Abstract
To examine the conditions under which mothers would consent to alcohol and drug screening of their infants, and to identify predictors of screening consent.
A cross-sectional survey was administered in person by trained research assistants on the postpartum units of three hospitals in a large Canadian urban centre over four months. The survey was administered to 1509 mothers (78.4% of those eligible) who were fluent in English and had given birth within the preceding 48 hours.
Mothers indicated that they would consent to screening of their newborn (1369/1460, 93.8%), and thought all mothers should consent if infants at risk would be more likely to receive effective treatment (1440/1476, 97.6%). Respondents believed that they would consent to screening if they were provided the following information: what would happen if the infant sample was positive for prenatal exposure (1431/1476, 97%); who would have access to the information (1377/1476, 93.4%); how effective medical care would be for the child (1435/1476, 97.4%); and the likelihood that a baby with a positive screen would have a problem (1444/1476, 98.1%). Self-reported alcohol use did not decrease willingness to consent. In a multivariate model, belief that universal screening would not make women feel discriminated against was a significant predictor of consent (adjusted OR 5.9; 95% CI 3.3-10.6).
Mothers would support a universal newborn alcohol and drug screening program if there was evidence that screening could lead to effective treatment for the mother and baby, and if appropriate resources were available.
PubMed ID
19497152 View in PubMed
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Anticipated acceptance of HPV vaccination at the baseline of implementation: a survey of parental and adolescent knowledge and attitudes in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164024
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2007 May;40(5):466-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
Sarah C Woodhall
Matti Lehtinen
Tiina Verho
Heini Huhtala
Mari Hokkanen
Elise Kosunen
Author Affiliation
University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2007 May;40(5):466-9
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Female
Finland
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Papillomavirus Infections - prevention & control
Papillomavirus Vaccines - administration & dosage
Parental Consent - statistics & numerical data
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Probability
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Vaccination - standards - trends
Abstract
We evaluated acceptance of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination by adolescents and their parents, 83% and 86% of whom accepted vaccination. Improving knowledge and awareness of HPV, and addressing parental concerns about vaccinating adolescents, most notably on vaccinating against a sexually transmitted disease, should help tackle factors associated with being resistant to accepting HPV vaccination.
PubMed ID
17448408 View in PubMed
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Atopic dermatitis among 2-year olds; high prevalence, but predominantly mild disease--the PACT study, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87233
Source
Pediatr Dermatol. 2008 Jan-Feb;25(1):13-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Smidesang Ingeborg
Saunes Marit
Storrø Ola
Øien Torbjørn
Holmen Turid Lingaas
Johnsen Roar
Henriksen Anne Hildur
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. ingeborg.smidesang@ntnu.no
Source
Pediatr Dermatol. 2008 Jan-Feb;25(1):13-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Chi-Square Distribution
Child, Preschool
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dermatitis, Atopic - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Parental Consent
Prevalence
Probability
Prognosis
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Atopic dermatitis is often the first and most prevalent manifestation of atopic disease in preschool children. The objectives of the present study were to determine the prevalence and severity of atopic dermatitis in 2-year-old children. Questionnaire data from a total population of 4784 two-year olds and data from a clinical investigation of a sub-sample of 390 children were obtained from a comprehensive prospective study (Prevention of Atopy among Children in Trondheim). The severity of the atopic dermatitis was scored both according to the Nottingham Eczema Severity Score and the Severity Scoring of Atopic Dermatitis. In the total population the prevalence of this disease, defined as any eczema and itchy rash was 16.5% (95% CI: 15.5-17.6). In the subsample, the corresponding prevalence was 20.6% (95% CI: 16.6-24.6) and 15.9% (95% CI: 12.3-19.5) when diagnosed by the UK Working Party's Criteria. More than 70% of the children with UK-diagnosed atopic dermatitis had mild disease according to both the Nottingham Eczema Severity Score and the Severity Scoring of Atopic Dermatitis. The prevalence of atopic dermatitis among 2-year olds was high. However, more than two-thirds of the children had mild disease, which may imply that the impact of atopic dermatitis as a risk factor for future atopic disease is limited.
PubMed ID
18304146 View in PubMed
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Barriers to consent to treatment: the rights of minors in the provision of mental health services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247022
Source
Can J Fam Law. 1979 Jul;2(3):245-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1979

Beyond Roe, after Casey: the present and future of a "fundamental" right.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4581
Source
Womens Health Issues. 1993;3(3):162-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
J. Benshoof
Author Affiliation
Center for Reproductive Law & Policy, New York, NY.
Source
Womens Health Issues. 1993;3(3):162-70
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Legal
Federal Government
Female
Forecasting
Government Regulation
Humans
Judicial Role
Minors
Parental Consent
Parental Notification
Personal Autonomy
Pregnancy
Pregnant Women
Supreme Court Decisions
United States
Vulnerable Populations
Women's Rights - legislation & jurisprudence - trends
Abstract
Although the US Supreme Court recently reaffirmed a woman's right to end a pregnancy before viability, many women remain unable to exercise that right because their access to abortion is limited. 83% of the counties in the nation have no abortion providers, and many women must travel hundreds of miles to obtain an abortion. In its Planned Parenthood of Southeastern Pennsylvania vs. Casey decision, the Supreme Court upheld what it felt were the central tenets of Roe vs. Wade but appointed an "undue burden" standard instead of a "strict scrutiny" standard for the courts to use when determining whether or not a state restriction is to be allowed. This means that women must prove "undue" harm from a restriction. 2 other new concepts contained in Casey are that the state has an interest in fetal life throughout a pregnancy and that the government does not have to remain neutral in an abortion case even if it did not involve the issue of funding. This means that states can try to discourage a woman's choice to have an abortion. Since Casey, the Supreme Court has refused to review several abortion cases and federal courts have taken action allowing abortion restrictions to go into effect in Pennsylvania, Utah, South Dakota, North Dakota, and Mississippi. State courts in Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Alaska, New York, and West Virginia have also heard abortion restriction cases in the past year. These restrictions involved a waiting period, criminalization, a residency requirement, a community hospital's ban on abortions, and state funding for abortion. Following the Casey decision, efforts were made to codify Roe by reintroducing the Freedom of Choice Act in Congress. During the committee process, however, the bill was amended in such a way as to make pro-choice advocates doubt that the amended version will be able to accomplish the aims of the original Act. Because the High Court ruled in Bray vs. Alexandria Women's Health Clinic that the ability of abortion clinics to prevent antichoice blockades is limited since the blockades do not violate civil rights laws, Congress is advancing a measure called "The Freedom of Access to Clinic Entrances Act" to counteract the harassment which occurs outside of the clinics. State legislatures have taken action to impose mandatory delays and biased counseling on abortion-seekers, restrict the access of young women to abortion, prohibit Medicaid funding for abortion, require unnecessary reporting regulations on the part of abortion services, and institute protective measures for reproductive rights. Although the right acknowledged in the Roe vs. Wade decision continues to exist, the struggle for women's reproductive autonomy must go forward to assure constitutional protection for the right to choose and guaranteed access to that right for all women.
PubMed ID
8274872 View in PubMed
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98 records – page 1 of 10.