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1027 records – page 1 of 103.

15-year-old tobacco and alcohol abstainers in a drier generation: Characteristics and lifestyle factors in a Norwegian cross-sectional sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300210
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2019 Jun; 47(4):439-445
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2019
Author
Ingeborg Lund
Janne Scheffels
Author Affiliation
Department of Alcohol, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Tobacco and Drugs, Norway.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2019 Jun; 47(4):439-445
Date
Jun-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Alcohol Abstinence - statistics & numerical data
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Leisure Activities
Life Style
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting - psychology
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Tobacco Use - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
Norwegian adolescents currently drink and smoke less on average than previous cohorts. Based on cross-sectional survey data, the individual and familial characteristics of 15-year-old non-users and users of alcohol and tobacco were compared to identify correlates to abstinence.
The survey was approved by the Norwegian Social Science Service. The sample consisted of 3107 adolescents from a 2011 school-based survey, of which 848 (27.3%) did not drink alcohol nor use tobacco. Associations with leisure time activities, risk perceptions, parenting style and social factors were analysed by logistic regression.
Most of the non-drinkers were also non-users of tobacco. Abstainers (neither alcohol nor tobacco use) tended to have less unorganized and more hobby-related leisure time activities, higher risk perceptions for smoking, and monitoring or emotionally supportive parents. They more rarely reported close relationships with their best friend and were more likely to report lower occurrences of drinking and smoking among friends or siblings.
Differences in perceived parenting styles and a lower degree of unorganized leisure in the abstainer group points to monitoring and closer emotional ties between parents and children as important factors in adolescent abstinence. An implication of these results is that promoting hobby-based activities might be a useful strategy for preventing alcohol and tobacco use in young people.
PubMed ID
29671371 View in PubMed
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Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 1986 Oct;24(10):28-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1986
Author
S P Hirst
J. Miller
Source
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv. 1986 Oct;24(10):28-34
Date
Oct-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Attitude
Canada
Counseling
Elder Abuse
Family
Female
Humans
Male
Nursing Assessment
Nursing Care
Parent-Child Relations
PubMed ID
3640822 View in PubMed
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Academic success across the transition from primary to secondary schooling among lower-income adolescents: understanding the effects of family resources and gender.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108330
Source
J Youth Adolesc. 2013 Sep;42(9):1331-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2013
Author
Lisa A Serbin
Dale M Stack
Danielle Kingdon
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Centre for Research in Human Development, Concordia University, 7141 Sherbrooke Street West PY-170, Montreal, QC, H4B 1R6, Canada. Lisa.Serbin@Concordia.CA
Source
J Youth Adolesc. 2013 Sep;42(9):1331-47
Date
Sep-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adolescent Psychology
Child
Educational Measurement
Family
Female
Humans
Income
Interviews as Topic
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Models, Psychological
Models, Statistical
Parent-Child Relations
Poverty
Prospective Studies
Psychological Theory
Quebec
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Schools
Sex Factors
Abstract
Successful academic performance during adolescence is a key predictor of lifetime achievement, including occupational and social success. The present study investigated the important transition from primary to secondary schooling during early adolescence, when academic performance among youth often declines. The goal of the study was to understand how risk factors, specifically lower family resources and male gender, threaten academic success following this "critical transition" in schooling. The study involved a longitudinal examination of the predictors of academic performance in grades 7-8 among 127 (56 % girls) French-speaking Quebec (Canada) adolescents from lower-income backgrounds. As hypothesized based on transition theory, hierarchical regression analyses showed that supportive parenting and specific academic, social and behavioral competencies (including spelling ability, social skills, and lower levels of attention problems) predicted success across this transition among at-risk youth. Multiple-mediation procedures demonstrated that the set of compensatory factors fully mediated the negative impact of lower family resources on academic success in grades 7-8. Unique mediators (social skills, spelling ability, supportive parenting) also were identified. In addition, the "gender gap" in performance across the transition could be attributed statistically to differences between boys and girls in specific competencies observed prior to the transition, as well as differential parenting (i.e., support from mother) towards girls and boys. The present results contribute to our understanding of the processes by which established risk factors, such as low family income and gender impact development and academic performance during early adolescence. These "transitional" processes and subsequent academic performance may have consequences across adolescence and beyond, with an impact on lifetime patterns of achievement and occupational success.
PubMed ID
23904002 View in PubMed
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Accepting parental responsibility: "future questioning" as a means to avoid foster home placement of children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224567
Source
Child Welfare. 1992 Jan-Feb;71(1):3-17
Publication Type
Article

Achenbach's Child Behavior Checklist and Teachers' Report Form in a normative sample of Greek children 6-12 years old.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200370
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1999 Sep;8(3):165-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1999
Author
A. Roussos
G. Karantanos
C. Richardson
C. Hartman
D. Karajiannis
S. Kyprianos
H. Lazaratou
O. Mahaira
M. Tassi
V. Zoubou
Author Affiliation
Attiki Child Psychiatry Hospital, 4 Garefi Street, 115 25 Athens, Greece. alrousou@ath.forthnet.gr
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 1999 Sep;8(3):165-72
Date
Sep-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis
Female
Greece
Humans
Male
Parent-Child Relations
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - standards
Reference Values
Schools
Sensitivity and specificity
Urban Population
Abstract
Achenbach's Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and Teachers' Report Form (TRF) were administered to 6-12 year old school children comprising a large random community sample (n = 1200) drawn from the whole of Greece. These are the first data on the TRF in Greece and the first nation-wide data on the CBCL. Appropriate cutoff points for the behavioral problems and competence scales of both questionnaires were obtained for boys and girls. These were considerably higher than USA cutoffs for the CBCL but not for the TRF. Analysis of scores in relation to degree of urbanization showed that it was not necessary to define different cutoffs in different strata. Parents' and teachers' ratings of the same child were most highly correlated for Externalizing and Aggressive behavior for boys and for Attention problems for both sexes.
PubMed ID
10550697 View in PubMed
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Adapting the concept of explanatory models of illness to the study of youth violence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162952
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2007 Jul;22(7):791-811
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
Páll Biering
Author Affiliation
University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. pb@hi.is
Source
J Interpers Violence. 2007 Jul;22(7):791-811
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adult
Caregivers - psychology
Feasibility Studies
Female
Humans
Iceland
Juvenile Delinquency - psychology
Male
Models, Psychological
Nursing Methodology Research
Parent-Child Relations
Parents - psychology
Questionnaires
Violence - psychology
Abstract
This study explores the feasibility of adapting Kleinman's concept of explanatory models of illness to the study of youth violence and is conducted within the hermeneutic tradition. Data were collected by interviewing 11 violent adolescents, their parents, and their caregivers. Four types of explanatory models representing the adolescent girls', the adolescent boys', the caregivers', and the parents' understanding of youth violence are found; they correspond sufficiently to Kleinman's concept and establish the feasibility of adapting it to the study of youth violence. The developmental nature of the parents' and adolescents' models makes it feasible to study them by means of hermeneutic methodology. There are some clinically significant discrepancies between the caregivers' and the clients' explanatory models; identifying such discrepancies is an essential step in the process of breaking down barriers to therapeutic communications. Violent adolescents should be encouraged to define their own explanatory models of violence through dialogue with their caregivers.
PubMed ID
17575063 View in PubMed
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Addictions and their familiality in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97821
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2010 Feb;1187:208-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Thorarinn Tyrfingsson
Thorgeir E Thorgeirsson
Frank Geller
Valgerdur Runarsdóttir
Ingunn Hansdóttir
Gyda Bjornsdottir
Anna K Wiste
Gudrun A Jonsdottir
Hreinn Stefansson
Jeffrey R Gulcher
Hogni Oskarsson
Daniel Gudbjartsson
Kari Stefansson
Author Affiliation
SAA Treatment Center, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2010 Feb;1187:208-17
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - genetics
Amphetamine-Related Disorders - genetics
Cocaine-Related Disorders - genetics
Cohort Studies
Databases, Factual
Female
Genealogy and Heraldry
Humans
Hypnotics and Sedatives
Iceland - epidemiology
Male
Marijuana Abuse - genetics
Marriage
Opioid-Related Disorders - genetics
Parent-Child Relations
Risk factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - genetics - therapy
Abstract
Here, we provide an overview of previous family studies of addiction and present a new family study based on clinical data for more than 19,000 individuals who have been treated for addiction in Iceland over the last three decades. Coupled with the extensive Icelandic genealogy information, this population-based sample provides a unique opportunity for family studies. The relative risk (RR) was determined for up to fifth-degree relatives of probands diagnosed with alcohol, cannabis, sedative, and amphetamine dependence. We observe highly significant RR values for all substances ranging from 2.27 for alcohol to 7.3 for amphetamine, for first-degree relatives, and RRs significantly above 1 for distant relations, where the effect of shared environmental factors is minimized. The magnitude of risk in psychostimulant dependence is particularly striking. These findings emphasize the role of genetics in the etiology of addiction and highlight the importance of substance-specific effects.
PubMed ID
20201855 View in PubMed
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Adding "Circle of Security - Parenting" to treatment as usual in three Swedish infant mental health clinics. Effects on parents' internal representations and quality of parent-infant interaction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295022
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2018 Jun; 59(3):262-272
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2018
Author
Pia Risholm Mothander
Catarina Furmark
Kerstin Neander
Author Affiliation
Department of psychology, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2018 Jun; 59(3):262-272
Date
Jun-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Caregivers - psychology
Child, Preschool
Emotions
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mental health
Object Attachment
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting
Parents - psychology
Psychology, Child
Sweden
Abstract
This study presents effects of adding Circle of Security-Parenting (COS-P) to an already established comprehensive therapeutic model for early parent-child intervention in three Swedish infant mental health (IMH) clinics. Parents' internal representations and quality of parent-infant interaction were studied in a clinical sample comprised of 52 parent-infant dyads randomly allocated to two comparable groups. One group consisted of 28 dyads receiving treatment as usual (TAU) supplemented with COS-P in a small group format, and another group of 24 dyads receiving TAU only. Assessments were made at baseline (T1), 6 months after inclusion (T2) and 12 months after inclusion (T3). Changes over time were explored in 42 dyads. In the COS-P group, the proportion of balanced representations, as assessed with Working Model of the Child Interview (WMCI), significantly increased between T1 and T3. Further, the proportion of emotionally available interactions, as assessed with Emotional Availability scales (EA), significantly increased over time in the COS-P group. Improvements in the TAU-group were close to significant. Limitations of the study are mainly related to the small sample size. Strength is the real world character of the study, where COS-P was implemented in a clinical context not otherwise adapted to research. We conclude by discussing the value of supplementing TAU with COS-P in IMH treatment.
PubMed ID
29244205 View in PubMed
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1027 records – page 1 of 103.