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Comparison of health care in Alaska and Scandinavia

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94570
Source
Pages 564-567 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976
  1 document  
Author
Price, B
Author Affiliation
Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Section of Community Health
Source
Pages 564-567 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Date
1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Aleuts
Ambulatory Care
Eskimos
Indian Health Service
Indians
Lapps
Paraprofessionals
Scandinavia
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Mental health services for American Indians: Neither feast nor famine

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101997
Source
White Cloud Journal of American Indian/Alaska Native Mental Health. 1978;1(2):3-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Summer-1978
Author
Beiser, M
Attneave, CL
Source
White Cloud Journal of American Indian/Alaska Native Mental Health. 1978;1(2):3-10
Date
Summer-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska Natives
American Indians
Healers
Indian Health Service Mental Health Programs
Indian leadership
Inpatient programs
Mental health
Outpatient services
Paraprofessionals
Residential treatment center
Traditional medicine
Abstract
The Indian Health Service, a division of the United States Public Health Service, is responsible for providing mental health services to approximately 500,000 American Indian and Alaska Native people. During the past 13 years the service has built a mental health program with inpatient and outpatient services, innovative projects to alleviate special Indian mental health problems, and statistical reporting procedures, all under increasing Indian leadership. During 1974, the mental health outpatient services reached three percent of reservation Indians. Inpatient services were provided by two hospitals and contracts with state hospitals. Future plans provide for increased services for children, new inpatient facilities, and expanded support of innovative approaches in Bureau of Indian Affairs dormitory personnel training and traditional Native American healers.
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On being everything and nothing: The retention of Native health care workesr in northern communities

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102129
Source
Pages 92-97 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
the personal, social and professional barriers responsible for high attrition among non-Native personnel. However, the rates of staff tumo~er among Native health professionals and paraprofessionals are also very high. The present study. which explores the factors affecting the retention of
  1 document  
Author
Kinch, P
Katt, M
Boone, M
Minore, B
Author Affiliation
Nishnawbe-Aski Nation, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada
Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada
Source
Pages 92-97 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Aboriginal people
First Nations
Health care workers
Health professions
Native health workers
Paraprofessionals
Retention
Shortage
Abstract
Encouraging aboriginal people to enter the health professions is widely seen as a partial remedy to the chronic shortage of health care workers in Canada's northern Native communities. It is assumed that cultural familiarity and community membership will overcome the personal, social, and professional barriers responsible for high attrition among non-Native personnel. However, the rates of staff turnover among Native health professionals and paraprofessionals are also very high. The present study, which explores the factors affecting the retention of paraprofessionals, is based on interviews with 48 current and former Community Health Representatives, Mental Health Workers, and National Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program Worker in the Nishnawbe-Aski First Nations of Northern Ontario. It reports their experience of being "everything and nothing" in the health care system--facing a scope of practice that far exceeds their training; finding themselves caught between community expectations and their employer's management policies; and not being accepted within the community as fully competent individuals.
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Paraprofessional training of Indian and Alaska Native mental health workers

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102010
Source
White Cloud Journal of American Indian/Alaska Native Mental Health. 1982;2(4):3-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982
Author
Mason, JC
Hansen, TC
Putnam, J
Source
White Cloud Journal of American Indian/Alaska Native Mental Health. 1982;2(4):3-8
Date
1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska Natives
American Indians
Curriculum
Mental health
Paraprofessional training
Abstract
This paper is an interim report of a project funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, Paraprofessionals Branch, and administered by the Seattle Indian Health Board to develop a model Indian mental health training program for Indian and Alaska Native paraprofessionals. The paper addresses the need for such a program, its precursors, administrative and academic/training structure and development, and concludes with current concerns of the program.
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