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43 records – page 1 of 5.

17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 is an independent prognostic marker in breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17431
Source
Cancer Res. 2004 Oct 15;64(20):7604-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2004
Author
Olayiwola O Oduwole
Yan Li
Veli V Isomaa
Anne Mäntyniemi
Anitta E Pulkka
Ylermi Soini
Pirkko T Vihko
Author Affiliation
Biocenter Oulu and Research Center for Molecular Endocrinology, WHO Collaborating Centre for Research on Reproductive Health, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Cancer Res. 2004 Oct 15;64(20):7604-9
Date
Oct-15-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
17-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenases - biosynthesis - genetics
Breast Neoplasms - enzymology - genetics - metabolism - pathology
Estrogen Receptor alpha - biosynthesis - genetics
Estrogen Receptor beta - biosynthesis - genetics
Female
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
In Situ Hybridization
Isoenzymes
Ki-67 Antigen - biosynthesis - genetics
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Paraffin Embedding
Prognosis
RNA, Messenger - biosynthesis - genetics
Receptor, erbB-2 - biosynthesis - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tumor Markers, Biological - biosynthesis - genetics
Abstract
Estrogens have an important role in the development and progression of breast cancer. 17beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (17HSD1), type 2 (17HSD2), and type 5 (17HSD5) are associated with sex steroid metabolism in normal and cancerous breast tissue. The mRNA expressions of the 17HSD1, 17HSD2, and 17HSD5 enzymes were analyzed in 794 breast carcinoma specimens by using tissue microarrays and normal histologic sections. The results were correlated with the estrogen receptor alpha (ER-alpha) and beta (ER-beta), progesterone receptor, Ki67, and c-erbB-2 expressions analyzed by immunohistochemical techniques and with the Tumor-Node-Metastasis classification, tumor grade, disease-free interval, and survival of the patients. Signals for 17HSD1 mRNA were detected in 16%, 17HSD2 in 25%, and 17HSD5 in 65% of the breast cancer specimens. No association between the 17HSD1, 17HSD2, and 17HSD5 expressions was detected. A significant association was observed between ER-alpha and ER-beta (P = 0.02; odds ratio, 1.96) expressions. There was also a significant inverse association between ER-alpha and 17HSD1 (P = 0.04; odds ratio, 0.53), as well as ER-alpha and 17HSD5 (P = 0.001; odds ratio, 0.35). Patients with tumors expressing 17HSD1 mRNA or protein had significantly shorter overall and disease-free survival than the other patients (P = 0.0010 and 0.0134, log rank). The expression of 17HSD5 was significantly higher in breast tumor specimens than in normal tissue (P = 0.033; odds ratio, 5.56). The group with 17HSD5 overexpression had a worse prognosis than the other patients (P = 0.0146). ER-alpha also associated with survival (P = 0.045). Cox multivariate analyses showed that 17HSD1 mRNA, tumor size, and ER-alpha had independent prognostic significance.
PubMed ID
15492288 View in PubMed
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Academic and nonacademic laboratories perform equally on CIQC immunohistochemistry proficiency testing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113089
Source
Am J Clin Pathol. 2013 Jul;140(1):55-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Zhongchuan Will Chen
Heather Neufeld
Maria A Copete
John Garratt
C Blake Gilks
Emina E Torlakovic
Author Affiliation
Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Am J Clin Pathol. 2013 Jul;140(1):55-60
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis
Canada
Data Collection
Female
Hospitals, Rural
Hospitals, Urban
Humans
Immunohistochemistry - standards
Laboratories - standards
Laboratory Proficiency Testing - standards
Paraffin Embedding
Pathology - standards
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Reproducibility of Results
Tissue Array Analysis
Tumor Markers, Biological - analysis
Workload
Abstract
To test whether academic centers (ACs) are more successful than nonacademic centers (NACs) in immunohistochemistry (IHC) external quality assessment challenges in the Canadian Immunohistochemistry Quality Control (CIQC) program.
Results of 9 CIQC challenges for breast cancer marker (BM) and various non-breast cancer marker (NBM) tests were examined. Success rates were compared between AC/NAC laboratories and those located in small or large cities. Performance was also correlated with annual IHC case volumes.
There was no statistically significant difference in performance in any of the comparisons. However, overall performance on BM was significantly better (P
PubMed ID
23765534 View in PubMed
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Aneuploidy in salivary gland adenomas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216258
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 1995;252(7):395-400
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
T. Atula
R. Grénman
P. Laippala
P J Klemi
Author Affiliation
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Turku University Central Hospital, Finland.
Source
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 1995;252(7):395-400
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - genetics - pathology
Adenoma - genetics - pathology - surgery
Adenoma, Pleomorphic - genetics - pathology
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aneuploidy
Biopsy, Needle
Carcinoma - genetics - pathology
Cell Division
DNA, Neoplasm - analysis - genetics
Diploidy
Female
Finland
Flow Cytometry
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - genetics - pathology
Paraffin Embedding
S Phase
Salivary Gland Neoplasms - genetics - pathology - surgery
Single-Blind Method
Abstract
The occurrence of abnormal nuclear DNA content in major salivary gland adenomas is not well known and its correlation with tumor recurrence has not been documented previously. From 1987 to 1991, 119 consecutive major salivary gland adenomas were operated on at Turku University Central Hospital. These tumors were analyzed by flow cytometry and 100 (84%) were found to be diploid, 12 (10%) near-diploid and 7 (6%) aneuploid with DNA indexes > 1.15. The mean proliferation rate measured as a percentage of cells in the S-phase fraction was 2.5 +/- 1.6%. The histological slides were then blindly reclassified according to current World Health Organization classification. As a result histological classification was changed in 3 tumors: malignant cells were found in 2 aneuploid tumors and 1 diploid neoplasm. Preoperative cytological fine-needle aspiration biopsy had been considered as possibly malignant in 2 of these cases. Among all case material 10 specimens were recurrent tumors; although the tendency to recur depended on the extent and adequacy of the surgery performed, multiple recurrences were associated with non-diploid tumors.
PubMed ID
8562033 View in PubMed
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An Integrative Genomic Analysis of Formalin Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Archived Serous Ovarian Carcinoma Comparing Long-term and Short-term Survivors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286940
Source
Int J Gynecol Cancer. 2016 Jul;26(6):1027-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
Karin Stålberg
Joakim Crona
Masoud Razmara
Diana Taslica
Britt Skogseid
Peter Stålberg
Source
Int J Gynecol Cancer. 2016 Jul;26(6):1027-32
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Cystadenocarcinoma, Serous - genetics - mortality - pathology
Female
Formaldehyde
High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing
Humans
Middle Aged
Ovarian Neoplasms - genetics - mortality - pathology
Paraffin Embedding
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Retrospective Studies
Survivors
Sweden - epidemiology
Tissue Fixation
Abstract
This study aimed to perform an integrative genetic analysis of patients with matched serous ovarian cancer having long-term or short-term survival using formalin fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples.
All patients with serous ovarian carcinoma who underwent surgery between 1998 and 2007 at the Department of Gynaecology, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden were considered. From this cohort, we selected biomaterial from 2 groups of patients with long-term and short-term survival matched for age, stage, histologic grade, and outcome of surgery. Genomic DNA from FFPE sample was analyzed with SNP array and targeted next-generation sequencing of 26 genes.
Forty-three samples (primary tumors and metastases) from 23 patients were selected for genomic profiling, the survival in the subgroups were 134 and 36 months, respectively. We observed a tendency toward increased genomic instability in those with long-term survival with higher proportion of somatic copy number alterations (P = 0.083) and higher average ploidy (P = 0.037). TP53 mutations were found in 50% of the patients. Frequency of TP53 mutations did not differ between the survival groups (P = 0.629).
We validated both previous genomic findings in ovarian cancer and the proposed association between increased genomic instability and better survival. These results exemplify that analysis of genomic biomarkers is feasible on archived FFPE tissue.
PubMed ID
27177282 View in PubMed
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Chlorinated paraffin analysis by gas chromatography Orbitrap high-resolution mass spectrometry: Method performance, investigation of possible interferences and analysis of fish samples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290837
Source
J Chromatogr A. 2018 Mar 02; 1539:53-61
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-02-2018
Author
Kerstin Krätschmer
Cristian Cojocariu
Alexander Schächtele
Rainer Malisch
Walter Vetter
Author Affiliation
University of Hohenheim, Institute of Food Chemistry (170b), Garbenstraße 28, 70599 Stuttgart, Germany; European Union Reference Laboratory (EU-RL) for PCBs and Dioxins in Feed and Food, Bissierstraße 5, 79114 Freiburg, Germany.
Source
J Chromatogr A. 2018 Mar 02; 1539:53-61
Date
Mar-02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Fishes
Food Analysis - methods
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - analysis
Limit of Detection
Norway
Paraffin - analysis
Polychlorinated biphenyls - analysis
Abstract
For decades, high quantities of short-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCP) and medium-chain chlorinated paraffins (MCCP) have been widely used, for instance as plasticizers or flame retardants, leading to global pollution due to unintentional emissions from products or waste. Due to the high complexity of chlorinated paraffins with several thousand congeners there is no consensus on an analytical procedure for SCCPs and MCCPs in food samples. Amongst the multitude of methods currently in use, high-resolution mass spectrometry is particularly valuable for in-depth studies of homologue patterns. Here we analyse SCCPs and MCCPs with gas chromatography coupled to high-resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry (GC-Orbitrap-HRMS) operated in full-scan acquisition in electron capture negative ion (ECNI) mode at 60,000 and 120,000 resolution (FWHM, m/z 200, equals roughly 30,000 and 60,000 at 5% peak height). Linear dynamic range, selectivity and sensitivity tests confirmed an excellent linearity in a concentration range of 25-15,000?pg/µL with very low limits of detection (LODs) in the low pg/µL range. Spiking experiments with high levels of native mono- and di-ortho-polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and mixtures of MCCP and SCCP standards did not have a negative impact on isotope ratios of the examined homologues. Besides the [M-Cl]- fragment ions used for quantification, the mass spectra of homologues also featured [M-HCl]- ions whose abundance increased with decreasing chlorination degree. In addition, [M-HCl-Cl]- ions were detected with a relative abundance of 5-10%. Three salmon (Salmo salar) samples farmed in Norway showed a consistent CP homologue pattern which differed both from the CP pattern in a sample from Scottish aquaculture and a wild salmon sample. These measurements produce evidence that discretely different CP patterns may exist in different areas of origin. Our results demonstrate that GC/ECNI-Orbitrap-HRMS is well-suited for the analysis of CPs by overcoming a range of mass interference problems and due to its thus far unmatched sensitivity.
PubMed ID
29397983 View in PubMed
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Chlorinated Paraffins in Human Milk from Urban Sites in China, Sweden, and Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306802
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2020 04 07; 54(7):4356-4366
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-07-2020
Author
Yihui Zhou
Bo Yuan
Elisabeth Nyberg
Ge Yin
Anders Bignert
Anders Glynn
Jon Øyvind Odland
Yanling Qiu
Yajie Sun
Yongning Wu
Qianfen Xiao
Daqiang Yin
Zhiliang Zhu
Jianfu Zhao
Åke Bergman
Author Affiliation
State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092, China.
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2020 04 07; 54(7):4356-4366
Date
04-07-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
China
Environmental monitoring
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated
Infant
Milk, Human
Norway
Paraffin
Sweden
Abstract
Short-, medium-, and long-chain chlorinated paraffins (SCCPs, MCCPs, and LCCPs) were analyzed in human milk from the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) and Scandinavia. Individual samples were collected from Shanghai, Jiaxing, and Shaoxing (China), Stockholm (Sweden), and Bodø (Norway) between 2010 and 2016. Mean concentrations (range) of SCCPs, MCCPs, and LCCPs in samples from the YRD were 124 [
PubMed ID
32101003 View in PubMed
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Chlorinated paraffins in indoor air and dust: concentrations, congener patterns, and human exposure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134188
Source
Environ Int. 2011 Oct;37(7):1169-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Ulrika E Fridén
Michael S McLachlan
Urs Berger
Author Affiliation
Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM), Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden. ulrika.friden@itm.su.se
Source
Environ Int. 2011 Oct;37(7):1169-74
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollution, Indoor - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Child, Preschool
Dust - analysis
Environmental monitoring
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - analysis
Infant
Inhalation Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Male
Paraffin - analysis
Sweden
Abstract
Chlorinated paraffins (CPs) are large production volume chemicals used in a wide variety of commercial applications. They are ubiquitous in the environment and humans. Human exposure via the indoor environment has, however, been barely investigated. In the present study 44 indoor air and six dust samples from apartments in Stockholm, Sweden, were analyzed for CPs, and indoor air concentrations are reported for the first time. The sumCP concentration (short chain CPs (SCCPs) and medium chain CPs (MCCPs)) in air ranged from
PubMed ID
21612825 View in PubMed
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Classification of breast cancer using genetic algorithms and tissue microarrays.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79962
Source
Clin Cancer Res. 2006 Nov 1;12(21):6459-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2006
Author
Dolled-Filhart Marisa
Rydén Lisa
Cregger Melissa
Jirström Karin
Harigopal Malini
Camp Robert L
Rimm David L
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8023, USA.
Source
Clin Cancer Res. 2006 Nov 1;12(21):6459-68
Date
Nov-1-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Breast Neoplasms - classification - metabolism - mortality
Female
Fluorescent Antibody Technique
Formaldehyde
Gene Expression
Humans
Paraffin Embedding
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Survival Analysis
Tissue Array Analysis
Tissue Fixation
Tumor Markers, Biological - analysis
Abstract
PURPOSE: A multitude of breast cancer mRNA profiling studies has stratified breast cancer and defined gene sets that correlate with outcome. However, the number of genes used to predict patient outcome or define tumor subtypes by RNA expression studies is variable, nonoverlapping, and generally requires specialized technologies that are beyond those used in the routine pathology laboratory. It would be ideal if the familiarity and streamlined nature of immunohistochemistry could be combined with the rigorously quantitative and highly specific properties of nucleic acid-based analysis to predict patient outcome. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We have used AQUA-based objective quantitative analysis of tissue microarrays toward the goal of discovery of a minimal number of markers with maximal prognostic or predictive value that can be applied to the conventional formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue section. RESULTS: The minimal discovered multiplexed set of tissue biomarkers was GATA3, NAT1, and estrogen receptor. Genetic algorithms were then applied after division of our cohort into a training set of 223 breast cancer patients to discover a prospectively applicable solution that can define a subset of patients with 5-year survival of 96%. This algorithm was then validated on an internal validation set (n=223, 5-year survival=95.8%) and further validated on an independent cohort from Sweden, which showed 5-year survival of 92.7% (n=149). CONCLUSIONS: With further validation, this test has both the familiarity and specificity for widespread use in management of breast cancer. More generally, this work illustrates the potential for multiplexed biomarker discovery on the tissue microarray platform.
PubMed ID
17085660 View in PubMed
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Claudins 1, 4, 5, 7 and occludin in ameloblastomas and developing human teeth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79356
Source
J Oral Pathol Med. 2007 Jan;36(1):48-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Bello Ibrahim O
Soini Ylermi
Slootweg Pieter J
Salo Tuula
Author Affiliation
Department of Diagnostics and Oral Medicine, Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Oral Pathol Med. 2007 Jan;36(1):48-54
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ameloblastoma - pathology
Ameloblasts - pathology
Amelogenesis - physiology
Cell Differentiation
Dental Enamel - pathology
Enamel Organ - pathology
Epithelium - pathology
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Membrane Proteins - analysis
Odontogenesis - physiology
Paraffin Embedding
Tight Junctions - pathology
Tooth Germ - pathology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To analyze the distribution pattern of claudins 1, 4, 5, 7 and occludin in benign and malignant ameloblastomas and developing human teeth. METHODS: Paraffin-embedded tissue specimens of 25 benign and four malignant ameloblastomas and two developing human teeth were examined immunohistochemically using antibodies against claudins 1, 4, 5, 7 and occludin. RESULTS: In ameloblastomas strongest expression was seen for claudins 1 and 7 while claudin 4 was expressed less frequently. Claudin 5 and occludin were seen only in a minority of cases. There were no evident differences in the expression of claudins or occludin neither between different histologic subtypes of ameloblastomas nor between benign or malignant cases. The strongest expression for claudins was present in the central stellatum reticulum-like cells surrounding the microcysts and in the areas with squamous differentiation of the ameloblastomas. In developing teeth both claudin 1 and 7 stained strongly in the enamel epithelium, ameloblasts, and enamel matrix, but staining for claudin 4 was relatively weak. Claudin 5 was preferentially expressed only in vessels, and occludin staining ranged from negative to weak in ameloblastomas and teeth germs. CONCLUSION: There were no clear differences in the expression levels between benign and malignant ameloblastic tumors. The overexpression of claudins in the areas with microcyst formation may indicate their attempt to maintain the interepithelial cohesion of the cells. The strong immunoreactivity of ameloblasts and newly synthesized enamel matrix for claudins 1 and 7 indicates that they may be involved in cell signaling influencing enamel formation.
PubMed ID
17181742 View in PubMed
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Comparison of archival plasma and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue for genotyping in hepatocellular carcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17244
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2005 Jan;14(1):251-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2005
Author
Malin I L Sjöholm
Gunilla Hoffmann
Stefan Lindgren
Joakim Dillner
Joyce Carlson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Chemistry, University Hospital MAS, Entrance 71, 205-02 Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2005 Jan;14(1):251-5
Date
Jan-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carcinoma, Hepatocellular - genetics - pathology
Comparative Study
Formaldehyde
Genotype
Humans
Liver Neoplasms - genetics - pathology
Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques
Paraffin Embedding
Plasma
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Time Factors
Tissue Fixation - methods
Abstract
Biobanks containing formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue, as well as frozen serum or plasma, are important resources for molecular epidemiologic studies. However, few studies have compared the reliability of formalin-fixed tissue samples and archival plasma samples for genotyping. We determined the genotype of four proposed genetic risk factors for hepatocellular carcinoma [hereditary hemochromatosis (HFE 63 and 282), alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency (AAT 342) and cystic fibrosis (CFTR 508)] on formalin-fixed tissue samples, stored for up to 25 years, from 318 patients diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma and on plasma or serum samples from 31 of these patients. The genotypes were analyzed by RFLP or allele-specific amplification as well as by TaqMan assays. In addition, genotyping was attempted after whole genome amplification by multiple displacement amplification (MDA). Genotyping was successful in 94% of the tissue samples and successful and identical to the tissue samples from the same subjects in 98% of the plasma/serum samples. DNA from plasma samples could be amplified >5,000-fold by MDA and genotyping after MDA gave identical results to the genotyping of the same subjects before whole genome amplification. MDA amplification of the tissue samples was not successful. In summary, archival plasma was found to be an adequate source of efficiently amplifiable DNA. MDA on plasma samples allows analysis of multiple genotypes in epidemiologic studies.
PubMed ID
15668502 View in PubMed
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43 records – page 1 of 5.