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Canadian oncogenic human papillomavirus cervical infection prevalence: systematic review and meta-analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131641
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2011;11:235
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Andrea C Tricco
Carmen H Ng
Vladimir Gilca
Andrea Anonychuk
Ba' Pham
Shirra Berliner
Author Affiliation
Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St Michael's Hospital, (38 Shuter Street), Toronto, Ontario, (M5B 1T8), Canada. triccoa@smh.ca
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2011;11:235
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
DNA, Viral - genetics
Female
Genotype
Humans
Middle Aged
Papillomaviridae - classification - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Papillomavirus Infections - epidemiology - virology
Papillomavirus Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Prevalence
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - prevention & control
Vaccination - utilization
Young Adult
Abstract
Oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) infection prevalence is required to determine optimal vaccination strategies. We systematically reviewed the prevalence of oncogenic cervical HPV infection among Canadian females prior to immunization.
We included studies reporting DNA-confirmed oncogenic HPV prevalence estimates among Canadian females identified through searching electronic databases (e.g., MEDLINE) and public health websites. Two independent reviewers screened literature results, abstracted data and appraised study quality. Prevalence estimates were meta-analyzed among routine screening populations, HPV-positive, and by cytology/histology results.
Thirty studies plus 21 companion reports were included after screening 837 citations and 120 full-text articles. Many of the studies did not address non-response bias (74%) or use a representative sampling strategy (53%). Age-specific prevalence was highest among females aged
Notes
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PubMed ID
21892939 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dose-Related Differences in Effectiveness of Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Against Genital Warts: A Nationwide Study of 550,000 Young Girls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269815
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2015 Sep 1;61(5):676-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-2015
Author
Maria Blomberg
Christian Dehlendorff
Carsten Sand
Susanne K Kjaer
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 2015 Sep 1;61(5):676-82
Date
Sep-1-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Condylomata Acuminata - epidemiology - prevention & control
Denmark - epidemiology
Dose-Response Relationship, Immunologic
Female
Humans
Mass Vaccination - statistics & numerical data
Papillomavirus Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Young Adult
Abstract
Reducing the number of doses in the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination regimen from 3 to 2 could increase coverage rates. In this cohort study, we assessed the risk of genital warts (GWs) according to timing and number of doses of quadrivalent HPV vaccine.
From population-based registries, we identified all girls in Denmark born during 1985-1999, for whom information on HPV vaccinations was retrieved. The cohort was followed for GW occurrence during 2006-2012. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were calculated by Poisson regression to determine differences in GW rates by number of vaccine doses.
Of the 550,690 girls in the cohort, 361 734 had been vaccinated. Of these, 25.9% had been vaccinated twice and 58.8% 3 times. The risk of GWs decreased significantly with each additional dose of vaccine. For girls who received 2 doses, extension of the interval between doses reduced the incidence of GWs. In comparison with a 2-month interval, the incidence of GWs was reduced by 45% (95% confidence interval [CI], 20%-62%), 55% (95% CI, 35%-69%), and 63% (95% CI, 44%-75%), with an interval of 4, 5, and 6 months, respectively. The IRR of 2 vs 3 doses was close to 1, with an interval of about 6 months between the first 2 doses.
With the original vaccine schedule, completion of 3 doses seems to be required to obtain full protection against GWs. A 2-dose regimen may be as effective if the dosing interval is extended to around 6 months, although the long-term effectiveness of this regimen is unknown.
PubMed ID
25944340 View in PubMed
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Effectiveness of the AS04-adjuvanted HPV-16/18 vaccine in reducing oropharyngeal HPV infections in young females-Results from a community-randomized trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311064
Source
Int J Cancer. 2020 07 01; 147(1):170-174
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-01-2020
Author
Matti Lehtinen
Dan Apter
Tiina Eriksson
Katja Harjula
Mari Hokkanen
Tuomas Lehtinen
Kari Natunen
Silvia Damaso
Maaria Soila
Dan Bi
Frank Struyf
Author Affiliation
Department of Infections and Cancer, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2020 07 01; 147(1):170-174
Date
07-01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aluminum Hydroxide - administration & dosage
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Human papillomavirus 16 - immunology
Human papillomavirus 18 - immunology
Humans
Lipid A - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives
Oropharyngeal Neoplasms - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control - virology
Oropharynx - immunology - virology
Papillomavirus Infections - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Papillomavirus Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Pharyngeal Diseases - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control - virology
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Young Adult
Abstract
We studied effectiveness of the AS04-adjuvanted HPV-16/18 (AS04-HPV-16/18) vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV) oropharyngeal infections associated with the increase of head/neck cancers in western countries. All 38,631 resident adolescents from 1994 to 1995 birth cohorts of 33 Finnish communities were invited in this community-randomized trial (NCT00534638). During 2008-2009, 11,275 girls and 6,129 boys were enrolled in three arms of 11 communities each. In Arm A, 90% of vaccinated girls/boys, and in Arm B, 90% of vaccinated girls received AS04-HPV-16/18 vaccine. Other Arm A/B and all Arm C vaccinated participants received control vaccine. All Arm A participants and Arm B female participants were blinded to vaccine allocation. Oropharyngeal samples were analyzed from 4,871 18.5-year-old females who attended follow-up visit 3-6?years postvaccination. HPV DNA prevalence was determined by SPF-10 LiPA and Multiplex type-specific PCR. Total vaccine effectiveness (VE) was defined as relative reduction of oropharyngeal HPV prevalence in pooled Arms A/B HPV-vaccinated females vs. all Arm C females. VE against oropharyngeal HPV-16/18, HPV-31/45 and HPV-31/33/45 infections were 82.4% (95% confidence intervals [CI]: 47.3-94.1), 75.3% (95%CI: 12.7-93.0) and 69.9% (95% CI: 29.6-87.1), respectively. In conclusion, the AS04-HPV-16/18 vaccine showed effectiveness against vaccine and nonvaccine HPV-types oropharyngeal infections in adolescent females up to 6?years postvaccination.
PubMed ID
31736068 View in PubMed
Less detail

Incidence of genital warts in Sweden before and after quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine availability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122449
Source
J Infect Dis. 2012 Sep 15;206(6):860-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2012
Author
Amy Leval
Eva Herweijer
Lisen Arnheim-Dahlström
Hasse Walum
Emma Frans
Pär Sparén
Julia F Simard
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Stockholm, Sweden. amy.leval@ki.se
Source
J Infect Dis. 2012 Sep 15;206(6):860-6
Date
Sep-15-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Child
Condylomata Acuminata - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Papillomavirus Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
More than 90% of genital warts (GW) cases are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) types 6 and 11. The introduction of HPV vaccines necessitates the estimation of the population-based incidence of GW immediately before and after vaccination uptake.
Incidence proportions were calculated using the entire population aged 10–44 years living in Sweden during 2006–2010. The Prescribed Drug Register and the National Patient Register were used to define GW episodes. Time trends were estimated using Poisson regression.
In 2010, age-stratified incidence proportions of GW were highest for 20-year-old women (956 cases/100 000), while the incidence proportion among males was greatest at the slightly older age of 24 years (1137 cases/100 000). Crude rates were marginally higher among males than among females during 2006–2007 and appeared to later diverge. Between 2008 and 2010, the overall incidence appeared to increase among males, and the incidence among females declined. Females aged 17 and 18 years had a >25% decline in GW rates between 2006 and 2010, with significant decreases through the age of 25 years.
This study provides a reasonable estimation of the incidence of GW in the Swedish population by use of register data, with results comparable to those from previous smaller studies. There was a downward trend of GW incidence among younger females between 2006 and 2010.
PubMed ID
22815381 View in PubMed
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Occurrence of human papillomavirus (HPV) type replacement by sexual risk-taking behaviour group: Post-hoc analysis of a community randomized clinical trial up to 9 years after vaccination (IV).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310691
Source
Int J Cancer. 2019 08 01; 145(3):785-796
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-01-2019
Author
Penelope Gray
Tapio Luostarinen
Simopekka Vänskä
Tiina Eriksson
Camilla Lagheden
Irene Man
Johanna Palmroth
Ville N Pimenoff
Anna Söderlund-Strand
Joakim Dillner
Matti Lehtinen
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Sciences, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2019 08 01; 145(3):785-796
Date
08-01-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Human papillomavirus 16 - immunology
Human papillomavirus 18 - immunology - isolation & purification
Humans
Male
Papillomavirus Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - virology
Papillomavirus Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Risk-Taking
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Sex Factors
Sexual Behavior - statistics & numerical data
Unsafe Sex
Young Adult
Abstract
Oncogenic non-vaccine human papillomavirus (HPV) types may conceivably fill the vacated ecological niche of the vaccine types. The likelihood of this may differ by the risk of acquiring HPV infections. We examined occurrence of HPV types among vaccinated and unvaccinated subgroups of 1992-1994 birth cohorts with differing acquisition risks up to 9 years post-implementation of HPV vaccination in 33 Finnish communities randomized to: Arm A (gender-neutral HPV16/18 vaccination), Arm B (girls-only HPV16/18 vaccination and hepatitis B-virus (HBV) vaccination of boys), and Arm C (gender-neutral HBV vaccination). Out of 1992-1994 born resident boys (31,117) and girls (30,139), 8,618 boys and 15,615 girls were vaccinated, respectively, with 20-30% and 50% coverage in 2007-2009. In 2010-2013, 8,868 HPV16/18 and non-HPV vaccinated females, and in 2014-2016, 5,574 originally or later (2010-2013) HPV16/18 vaccinated females attended two cervical sampling visits, aged 18.5 and 22-years. The samples were typed for HPV6/11/16/18/31/33/35/39/45/51/52/56/58/59/66/68 using PCR followed by MALDI-TOF MS. HPV prevalence ratios (PR) between Arms A/B vs. C were calculated for Chlamydia trachomatis positives (core-group), and negatives (general population minus core group). At both visits the vaccine-protected HPV type PRs did not significantly differ between the core-group and non-core group. Among the vaccinated 18-year-olds, HPV51 occurrence was overall somewhat increased (PRcore = 1.4, PRnon-core. = 1.4) whereas the HPV52 occurrence was increased in the core-group only (PRcore = 2.5, PRnon-core = 0.8). Among the non-HPV vaccinated 18-year-olds, the HPV51/52 PRs were higher in the core-group (PRcore = 3.8/1.8, PRnon-core = 1.2/1.1). The 22-year-olds yielded no corresponding observations. Monitoring of the sexual risk-taking core-group may detect early tendencies for HPV type replacement.
PubMed ID
30719706 View in PubMed
Less detail

Population-level impact of the bivalent, quadrivalent, and nonavalent human papillomavirus vaccines: a model-based analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119417
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2012 Nov 21;104(22):1712-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-21-2012
Author
Nicolas Van de Velde
Marie-Claude Boily
Mélanie Drolet
Eduardo L Franco
Marie-Hélène Mayrand
Erich V Kliewer
François Coutlée
Jean-François Laprise
Talía Malagón
Marc Brisson
Author Affiliation
Centre de recherche FRSQ du CHA universitaire de Québec, Québec, Canada.
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2012 Nov 21;104(22):1712-23
Date
Nov-21-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada - epidemiology
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - epidemiology - prevention & control - virology
Child
Condylomata Acuminata - epidemiology - prevention & control - virology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Papillomavirus Infections - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Papillomavirus Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Sexual Behavior
Uterine Cervical Dysplasia - epidemiology - prevention & control - virology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control - virology
Young Adult
Abstract
Bivalent and quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are now licensed in several countries. Furthermore, clinical trials examining the efficacy of a nonavalent vaccine are underway. We aimed to compare the potential population-level effectiveness of the bivalent, quadrivalent, and candidate nonavalent HPV vaccines.
We developed an individual-based, transmission-dynamic model of HPV infection and disease in a population stratified by age, gender, sexual activity, and screening behavior. The model was calibrated to highly stratified sexual behavior, HPV epidemiology, and cervical screening data from Canada.
Under base case assumptions, vaccinating 12-year-old girls (70% coverage) with the bivalent (quadrivalent) vaccine is predicted to reduce the cumulative incidence of anogenital warts (AGWs) by 0.0% (72.1%), diagnosed cervical intraepithelial neoplasia lesions 2 and 3 (CIN2 and -3) by 51.0% (46.1%), and cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) by 31.9% (30.5%), over 70 years. Changing from a bivalent (quadrivalent) to a nonavalent vaccine is predicted to reduce the cumulative number of AGW episodes by an additional 66.7% (0.0%), CIN2 and -3 episodes by an additional 9.3% (12.5%), and SCC cases by an additional 4.8% (6.6%) over 70 years. Differences in predicted population-level effectiveness between the vaccines were most sensitive to duration of protection and the time horizon of analysis. The vaccines produced similar effectiveness at preventing noncervical HPV-related cancers.
The bivalent vaccine is expected to be slightly more effective at preventing CIN2 and -3 and SCC in the longer term, whereas the quadrivalent vaccine is expected to substantially reduce AGW cases shortly after the start of vaccination programs. Switching to a nonavalent vaccine has the potential to further reduce precancerous lesions and cervical cancer.
Notes
Comment In: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2012 Nov 21;104(22):1698-70123104325
Comment In: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2013 May 1;105(9):664; discussion 665-623503601
Comment In: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2013 May 1;105(9):664-523767055
PubMed ID
23104323 View in PubMed
Less detail

Quantifying the impact of dissimilar HPV vaccination uptake among Manitoban school girls by ethnicity using a transmission dynamic model.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108122
Source
Vaccine. 2013 Oct 1;31(42):4848-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1-2013
Author
Leigh Anne Shafer
Ian Jeffrey
Brenda Elias
Brenna Shearer
Karen Canfell
Erich Kliewer
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. Electronic address: shafer@umanitoba.ca.
Source
Vaccine. 2013 Oct 1;31(42):4848-55
Date
Oct-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Ethnic Groups
Female
Humans
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Papillomavirus Infections - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Papillomavirus Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Schools
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Vaccination - utilization
Abstract
Gardasil, a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, began among grade 6 girls in Manitoba, Canada in 2008. In Manitoba, there is evidence that First Nations, Métis, and Inuit women (FNMI) have higher HPV prevalence, lower invasive cervical cancer (ICC) screening, and higher ICC incidence than all other Manitoban (AOM) women. We developed a mathematical model to assess the plausible impact of unequal vaccination coverage among school girls on future cervical cancer incidence.
We fit model estimated HPV prevalence and ICC incidence to corresponding empirical estimates. We used the fitted model to evaluate the impact of varying levels of vaccination uptake by FNMI status on future ICC incidence, assuming cervical screening uptake among FNMI and AOM women remained unchanged.
Depending on vaccination coverage, estimated ICC incidence by 2059 ranged from 15% to 68% lower than if there were no vaccination. The level of cross-ethnic sexual mixing influenced the impact that vaccination rates among FNMI has on ICC incidence among AOM, and vice versa. The same level of AOM vaccination could result in ICC incidence that differs by up to 10%, depending on the level of FNMI vaccination. Similarly, the same level of FNMI vaccination could result in ICC incidence that differs by almost 40%, depending on the level of AOM vaccination.
If we are unable to equalize vaccination uptake among all school girls, policy makers should prepare for higher levels of cervical cancer than would occur under equal vaccination uptake.
PubMed ID
23933332 View in PubMed
Less detail

Seroepidemiology as basis for design of a human papillomavirus vaccination program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92562
Source
Vaccine. 2008 Sep 26;26(41):5263-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-26-2008
Author
Ryding J.
French K M
Naucler P.
Barnabas R V
Garnett G P
Dillner J.
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Microbiology, Lund University. Malmö University Hospital, 205 02 Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Vaccine. 2008 Sep 26;26(41):5263-8
Date
Sep-26-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Child
Female
Human papillomavirus 16 - immunology
Humans
Immunization Programs
Male
Models, Theoretical
Papillomavirus Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Papillomavirus Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology - standards
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Sexual Behavior
Sweden
Vaccination
Young Adult
Abstract
We have performed a serological survey of HPV type 16-antibody prevalence by age and sex in Sweden and used it as a basis for modelling the optimal vaccination strategies in this population. Samples of 3,317 subjects were tested for HPV16-specific antibodies. The observed age-specific seroprevalences along with sexual behaviour data were used to infer parameter values for a mathematical model representing Sweden and the preventive effect of possible strategies estimated. By the year 2055, vaccination of females starting at age 12 in 2008 was most efficient, estimated to prevent 5.8 million cumulative HPV16 infections. Catch-up programs had a strong additional preventive effect. Vaccination also targeting males increased protective effect by about 4%, but had lower preventive effect per vaccination given. Addition of an HPV serosurvey to existing models and data has enabled us to estimate effect of different vaccination strategies, optimized to the HPV epidemiology in our population.
PubMed ID
18692109 View in PubMed
Less detail

Substantially reduced incidence of genital warts in women and men six years after HPV vaccine availability in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294901
Source
Vaccine. 2018 04 05; 36(15):1917-1920
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
04-05-2018
Author
Eva Herweijer
Alexander Ploner
Pär Sparén
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: eva.herweijer@ki.se.
Source
Vaccine. 2018 04 05; 36(15):1917-1920
Date
04-05-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Condylomata Acuminata - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Papillomavirus Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Papillomavirus Vaccines - administration & dosage - immunology
Population Surveillance
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Vaccination
Vaccination Coverage
Young Adult
Abstract
Between 2007 and 2011, opportunistic HPV-vaccination was available in Sweden and partially subsidized to girls aged 13-17, reaching a ~30% overall coverage.
All Swedish women/men aged 15-44 were followed between 2006 and 2012 for condyloma. Average annual percent changes (AAPCs) in incidence were estimated.
Substantial decreases were seen in women aged 15-24 from 2008-onwards (AACP-range: -8.5% to -18.5%); similar effects were seen for men aged 15-29 (AACP-range: -7.0% to -16.6%) from 2010-onwards.
Despite low population vaccination coverage in women and no coverage in men, similar condyloma incidence reductions were observed among men and women, with delays of >1?years in men.
PubMed ID
29523448 View in PubMed
Less detail

9 records – page 1 of 1.